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Publication numberUS1636806 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 26, 1927
Filing dateDec 7, 1922
Priority dateDec 7, 1922
Publication numberUS 1636806 A, US 1636806A, US-A-1636806, US1636806 A, US1636806A
InventorsHarry E Campbell
Original AssigneeCampbell Metal Window Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Window frame and sash construction
US 1636806 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 26 1927.

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, wvemto'c Herr 4 E Camp 08/! Patented July 26, 1927.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HARRY E. CAMPBELL, OF BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, ASSIGNOR TO CAMPBELL METAL WINDOW CORPORATION, OF BALTIMORE, MARYLAND, A CORPORATION OF MARY- LAND.

WINDOW FRAME AND SASH CONSTRUCTION.

Application filed December 7, 1922. Serial No. 605,359.

This invention relates to windows, and particularlyto a form of window which has sashes adapted to slide in different planes, but in which the sashes are adapted to take position in a common plane to close the window opening. The illustrative example givavoid confusion I call the face of the sash or frame which is on the exterior of the building the front face, and the opposite or interior face the rear face. The four walls which bound the exterior periphery of the frame I term outer walls. and those which bound the window opening in the frame I term 'inner walls.

In the accompanying drawings Fig. I is a vertical section of my window frame and sashes showing the sashes in the closed position; Fig. II is a similar section showing the sashes partly opened and in position for raising and lowering; Fig. III is a cross section on line 33 of Fig. I; Fig. IV is a cross section on line H of Fig. II; Fig. V is a sectional detail of the lower left hand corner of the window looking at the same from the inside and with the parts in the position shown in Fig. II; Fig. V1 is a sectional detail of the arrangement of parts at one end of the meeting rail looking at the same from the inside of the window with the parts in the position shown in Fig. I; Fig. VII is a sectional view of a locking and opening mechanism that can advantageously be used with my window, and Fig. VIII is a plan view thereof.

In Figs. I and II, transverse breaks are shown by dot and dash lines to bring-the height of the frame, on the scale indicated, within the compass of the sheet. In Figs. I and II the middle vertical section is shown as broken away.

In the example shown, the metal frame is composed of the hollow lintel A, the sill B and two hollow jambs as C, which rest upon the sill and in turn support the lintel. There are two sashes E and F here one above the other. The side rail of the sash E is composed of a main portion 6 having "an L- shaped cross section, as shown in Figs. III and IV, and a glass holding strip 7 likewise having an L-shaped cross section. The lass holding strip 7 is made with a bulge 8 w ich I provide in order to reduce friction between the side rails of sashes E and F as the window is opened and closed. Lower sash F has its side rails made up with the main portion 9 of the same shape as the portion 6 of the sash E, and has a glass strip 10 which is the same shape as the glass strip 7, except that it is not provided with a bulge corresponding to the bulge 8. The top rail of sash E is similarly formed with a main portion 11, of a shape similar to portion 6, and a glass holding strip 12, of a shape similar to the corresponding strip 10. The bottom rail of lower sash F is made up of a T-shaped portion 13 of which one arm 14 extends downwardly to meet the sill. The lower glass holding strip 15 has an inwardly extending portion 16 and a downwardly and outwardly extending portion 17 which is adapted to meet the sill. As shown in Fig. V the outer ends of the vertical portion of the glass holding strip 15 are extended beyond the side rail portions 9 and 10, therey providing guides 18. The meeting rails (20 of sash E and 21 of sash F) are channeled and beveled in the same way as the aneeting rails described in my earlier application hereinafter' referred to. The marginal portions of the sashes are connected together at the corners in the manner described in the said application.

In the bottom wall of the lintel A is formed, preferably by opening the metal of which the lintel is formed a channel or groove 22, in which may be positioned one or more screws 23 which will limit the upward movement of sash E. These screws may pass through packing material as 24 in order to keep them from working loose.

The sill B has an upper flat surface 25, a portion 26 which is substantially vertical and an outwardly extending portion 27. The portion 26 is preferably so placed that when the lower sash is swung in far enough to permit the upper sash to be lowered, the face of the arm 14 will lie against the portion 26 so that the window can remain substantially closed at the bottom while being open at the top. The sill B is also provided with an adjustable stop 28 which is adapted to co-operate With the portion 17 of the lower sash F. The jambs C may be-connected with the lintel A and the sill B in the manner shown in my earlier application hereinafter referred to.

The jambs C, which, of course, are alike on opposite sides of the frame, have the front wall 29, the outer wall 30 and the rear wall 31 made of a single piece of metal. The rear wall 31 is bent and continues on to form a portion 32 of the inner wall. The front wall 29 is similarly bent to form a portion 33 of the inner wall and is again bent to form the outwardly projecting flange 34. The main portion of the jamb C is divided into two compartments for receiving the window weights G, by a partition wall 35, which is bent to form, at 36, a portion which lies in a plane parallel to the portion 32. The end of the portion 36 may be bent into a hook to engage the end of the portion 32. The partition 35 can easily be removed to insert the weights G.

Inside the member 36 I provide the plate 37 which is adapted to be attached to' the sill and lintel by the use of flanges, such as are indicated at 38, which may be connected with the sill and lintel in any desired manner. The plate 37 is bent inwardly at 39 and is then bent again to the front to form the portion 40 which lies in the same plane as portion 33 but is of such a length as to leave a gap or opening between the portion 40 and the portion 33. Thip gap is wide enough to receive sashes E and F as is shown in Fig. IV. In order to permit of changing the size of the ga between the portions 33 and 40, so that w en the window is closed this gap will be of a width equal to the thickness of one sash, I screw to the wall 39 blocks 41, and to these blocks pivot links 42. Pivoted to the free ends of the links 42 is a plate 43 which lies in a plane parallel to the portion 40 and may be provided with a stiifening flange 44 which lies in a plane parallel to the plane of portion 39. Obviously the weight of the plate 43 will tend to pull the links 42 down, which in turn will tend to throw the plate 43 against the sashes. As the plate 43 will fall away from the lintel A when the window is closed, I provide the portion 40 at its top with an extension 45, as is shown in Fig. I. This extension 45 serves to close the gap that would be left when plate 43 drops and also serves as a stop to limit upward movement of sash F. It is to be noted that the links 42 are of such length that when the Window is closed and plate 43 has dropped, the angle between the links and the vertical portion 39 is less than 45, so that as the window is opened and the plate 43 is moved up and back, the links approach more nearly toward a dead center and thus less pressure is exerted on the sashes during the time that they are being slid past each other than is exerted when the window is closed.

Near the upper edge of sash E. I attach a plate 46 which is bent first toward the plate 37, then toward the front wall 29 to form the portion 47, and'then inwardly toward the inner wall 33 to form the portion 48. (See Fig. III.) The portion 48 is provided with an appropriate opening to receive a suspension chain H. The portion 47 of plate 46 willserve to limit transverse movement of the upper portion of sash E. Transverse movement of the lower portion of the sash E may be limited by screws 49 which are placed in the ends of'the meeting rail 20. (See Figs. I and II.

Near the upper e ge of sash F I attach aplate 50, the free end of which is provided in its upper portion with an appropriate aperture to receive a suspension chain H. The lower portion of the free edge of the plate 50 is bent toward the plate 37 to form a flange 51, which limits transverse movement of the upper portion of sash F. Transverse movement of the lower edge of sash F is limited by the guides 18, which have already been described. The limitation of transverse movement should be most carefully adjusted near the meeting rails and the adjustment of the upper sash E at this.

point can be taken care of by screw 49 and the adjustment of the lower sash F at this point can be taken care of by bending the flange 51 of plate 50.

It is obvious that when the window is closed the sashes will be held against in and out movement by the weight of plates 43. However, when the window is partly opened, as shown in Fig. II, the plate 43 is pushed up and back, and so if the upper sash is brought down until it clears channel 22 in lintel A, the upper portion of sash E might tend to rattle. This is taken care of by the fact that portion 48 of plate 46 overlaps flange 34 so that when the suspension chain H is attached to the portion 48 there will be relatively little in and out movement possible between these parts. Obviously there can be no undue in and out movement of the upper edge of the lower sash F and the lower edge of the upper sash E when the window is partly open, as these two portions hold each other in place. To guide the lower edge of lower sash F I attach to plate 37 guide strips as 52 with which the guides 18 co-operate. It is to be noted that guide strips 52 do'not run all the way to the sill but are cut off short enough to allow guides 18 to pass under them when the window is closed.

When the window is in closed position the weight of plates 43 ordinarily will be sulficient to prevent in and out movement of the sashes at the meeting rail? However, if sufficient wind pressure were developed it might be possible for the meeting rails "to be forced back into the building with the result that plates 43 would be pushed back and up. This would leave openings between the front faces of the sashes and the portions 33 of the inner wall, so that cold air could easily pass around the vertical edges of the sashes. .Clearly the plates 43 cannot move back unless they also move upwardly. I therefore so arrange the parts that the plates 43 cannot move upwardly unless lower sash F is moved in a like direction. This I accomplish by attaching to the rear faces of plates 43 blocks 53, which may be screwed to plates 43 through slots, to permit of adjustment. Extending from the blocks *53 are pins as '54. The blocks 53 are so positioned that when the window is closed the lower edge of plates will contact with the pins 54. This is clearly shown in Fig. VI.

If we consider the window to be in closed position, as shown in Fig. I, and if the lower edge of the sash F were pushed directly up, it is clear that the meeting rail 21 would be pushed back due to the angle at which it meets meeting rail 20. The upward movement of sash F would raise plate 50 thereby permitting pin 54 and plate 43 to move upward. If, however, the lower portion of sash F were lifted up directly, guides 18 would stay in front of guide strips 52 and the window would quickly jamb. Accordingly I find it advisable to provide mechanism whereby, when the window is beingopened, the lower portion of sash F will be brought back on an angle of approximately 45 at the same time that the upper portion is moved back due to the beveled faces of meeting rails 20 and 21. This mechanism is provided in the form of a booster handle which is attached to the lower portion of sash F, as is shown in Fig. VII. The attachment is provided through a block 56 which is screwed through the glass holding strip 15 into the T-shaped member 13. The booster handle 55 is pivoted to block 56 by a pin 57, and is extended beyond the pin 57 to form the lever arm 58. Pivoted to the end of the lever arm 58 is a link 59, the

is exerted due to the fact that the other end of which is pivoted to a second link 60, which in turn is pivoted to the block 56. The portions 16 and 17 of'the glass holding strips 15 are slotted to provideroom for links 59 and 60 and the bottom of the link 59 is adapted to contact with portion 25 of sill B. The length of lever arm 58 and links 59 and 60 are so proportioned that when the booster handle 55 is lifted the lower portion of sash F will be mowed about the bottom end of link" 59 as a pivot, and will be swung backwardly and upwardly at an angle of approximately 45; at the same time considerable leverage lever arm 58 is shorter than the distance from pin 57 to the back edge of booster handle 55. No other lifting handle is provided on the window so that when it is desired to open the window the operator naturally lifts it by booster handle 55. The result is that sash F is kept practically vertical and guides 18 are thrown back of guide strips 52.

If it is desired to lock my window I can readily incorporate an automatic lock with the booster handle. This is done by providing a member 61 which has a lower hook portion 62 adapted to engage in a recess out in stop 28 and has alever arm 63 which is so positioned in relation to booster handle 55 that when one takes hold of booster handle 55 hook 62 is thrown out of engagement with the recess in stop 28. The weight of the lever arm 63 is suificient to cause the hook 62 to engage when the window is closed.

The assembly of my window is very simple. The main portions of the jambs C are attached to the lintel A and the sill B. The weights G are then inserted and thepartition 35 is put in place with its end hooked over plate 32. The sashes are then inserted against member 33 and the suspension chains are connected. Plate 37 is then put in and if the lateral adjustment of the' sashes is not satisfactory, this can be corrected by adjusting screw 49 and adjusting the degree to which flange 51 is bent. As soon as these adjustments are correctly made plate 37 is screwed to the flanges38 which are attached to the sill and lintel respectively. The window is then closed and adjusted by turning screws 23 in or out so that the beveled portions bf meeting rails 20 and 21 will exactly contact. Finally stop 28 is moved up against the inclined portion 17 which lies at the bottom of the lower sash.

It is to be understood that the example given is by way of illustration only and that many modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of my invention. This application is in part a continuation of my earlier application Serial No. 576,228, filed July 20, 1922.

What I claimis:

1. A window-frame and sash construction comprising jambs, sashes having'frames adapted to slide in the jambs in different planes, the frame of the lower sash being adapted to move into the plane of the upper sash to close the window while remaining parallel to the upper sash, and means movement of the lower sash for automatically causing the frame of the lower sash to move into the lane of the up er sash and close the joint between the sas es.

2. A. device as defined in claim 1, which comprises means brought into operation by a closing movement of the lower sash for "brought into operation by a downward holding the lower sash with its frame in the plane of the upper sash and for holding the joint between the sashes closed until the lower sash is given an upward movement.

3. A device as defined in claim 1 which comprises means brought into operation by a closing movement of the lower sash for holding the lower sash with its frame in the plane of the upper sash, and for holding the joint between the sashes closed until the lower sash is iven an upward movement, and further characterized by includ ing means brought into operation by an upward movement of the lower sash for causing the lower sash frame automatically to move out of the plane of the upper sash.

4. A window-frame and sash construction comprising jambs, upper and lower sashes the frames of which are of such height as to permit such frames to lie in the same plane when the window is closed, gaps in the jambs. adapted to receive portions of the sash frames, such gaps being so arranged as to permit the sash frames to occupy the same or different planes, and means for causing such sash frames to move into a. common plane when the window is closed by force exerted in a vertical direction, and for causing such sashes to take position in different planes when the window is opened by a force exerted in a vertical direction.

5. A window-frame and sash construction, comprising jambs each of which has a gap in its inner face, upper and lower sashes the frames of which extend into said gaps, a movable plate forming one edge of each such gap, means for holding such plates in operative relation to the lower sash, and means for moving the lower sash in and out of the plane of the upper sash as the window is closed and opened, so that when the window is closed, said movable plates will contact with both sashes to seal the joints between the sashes and the jambs, and will'automatically move back as the window is opened to permit the lower sash to slide alongside of the upper sash while remaining parallel therewith.

6. The combination of a window-frame comprising jambs and a sill, sashes adapted to slide in said jambs in different planes, the lower sash being adapted to move into the plane of the upper sash to close the window while remaining parallel with the upper sash, meeting rails on the sashes adapted-to contact in two planes when the window is closed and adapted to permit the lower sash to move in a generally diagonal direction during its closing movement, and a rail at the bottom of the lower sash adapted to move from the plane in which it slides, into the plane of the upper sash in a generally diagonal direction and into a closed position, and when in such closed position to contact with the sill in two planes,

the joints between the two meeting rails and between the sill and the lower sash rail being so correlated that, when the upper sash is closed, the lower sash can be moved in and out of the plane of the upper sash while remaining substantially parallel to such plane.

7. A device as specified in claim 6 further characterized by including cam surfaces so arranged that when the lower sash is given an upward movement from its closed position, it will be moved out of the plane of the upper sash.

8. A device as specified in claim 6, further characterized by including cam surfaces forming part of the meeting rails which are so arranged that when the lower sash is given an upward movement from its closed position, it will be moved out of the plane of the upper sash.

9..A device as specified in claim 6, in which the lower sash rail is adapted to be brought into contact with the sill while the lower sash is in the plane in which it slides.

10. A window-frame and sash construction comprising jambs, each having a vertical gap in its inner face, sashes having members adapted to slide in said gaps in different planes, such sashes being adapted to take position in a common plane to close the window opening, and a member mounted on each jamb adjacent to the inner face thereof, adapted to move by the force of gravity to reduce the size of such gap and assist in causing said sashes to take position in a common plane. I

11. A window-frame and sash construction in which the sashes are adapted to slide in substantially parallel planes and are adapted to move into substantially the same plane to close the window, comprising sashes having meeting rails with cooperating faces so inclined that when the window is closed and one sash is moved vertically in relation to the other sash, such inclined faces will cause the sashes to take positions in different-planes to permit them to slide alongside of each other.

12. A window frame and sash cons-true tio-n comprising jambs having vertical gaps in their inner faces, sashes adapted to slide in such gaps, members mounted adjacent the inner faces of such jambs adapted to be moved in a direction diagonal to the gaps to vary the width of the gaps, and connections between a sash and such members adapted to prevent movement of such members while such sash remains in a closed position.

13. A window frame and sash construction comprising jambs, vertical openings in the inner faces of the jambs, a pair of sashes adapted to slide in different planes in such openings and to move into a common plane to close the window, members adapted to reduce the size of the openings when the window is closed mounted adjacent the inner faces of the jambs in such a manner that their movement is in a direction diagonal to the openings, and abutments on such members adapted, when such sash is closed, to contact with a portion of one of the sashes to prevent vertical movement of such mem bers independent of such sash, whereby horizontal movement of such members independent of vertical movement of such sash is prevented.

14. A window frame and sash construction comprising jambs, vertical openings in the inner faces of the jambs, sashes adapted to slide in such openings, members mounted adjacent the inner faces of the jambs adapted to vary the size of such. openings, and means for controlling the movement of such members so that when the window is closed, movement of such members in a horizontal direction can take place only if the sash is moved to open the window.

15. A window frame and sash construction comprising jambs, openings in the jambs, sashes adapted to slide in the openings in difierent planes and adapted to move into one plane to close the window, and members exerting yielding pressure against one sash when the sashes are in diflferent planes and adapted to move against both sashes to close the unoccupied portions of the openings when the window is closed, so that the vertical joints of the window will be automatically sealed when the window is closed.

16. The elements defined in claim in combination with lever mechanism adapted to raise the lower sash and at the same time to move it inward against such yielding pressure.

17. The elements defined in claim 15 in combination with lever mechanism adapted .to start the sliding movement of the lower sash and locking mechanism adapted to hold the lower sash a ainst movement, so arranged that the wlndow will be unlocked as an incident to the operation of such lever mechanism.

18. A structure as characterized in claim 15 in which one of the sashes is provided with vertical ridges to reduce 'friction between the sashes when the window is belower sash ada ted to contact with such,

upwardly exten g portion when the lower 838%: is moved out of the plane of the upper sas HARRY E. CAMPBELL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4949504 *May 3, 1989Aug 21, 1990Molteni & C. S.P.A.Guiding device for sliding doors which are reciprocally coplanar at the closed position thereof
US6088963 *Aug 26, 1997Jul 18, 2000Cawthon; Mark C.Automotive bay pit cover with panels having tapered ends for vertical stacking
US8113607May 8, 2009Feb 14, 2012Steelcase Inc.Storage assembly
US8245445 *Jul 17, 2008Aug 21, 2012Enrique Lago PalaciosSash window
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/128, 49/303, 49/276
International ClassificationE06B3/44
Cooperative ClassificationE06B2003/4453, E06B3/44
European ClassificationE06B3/44