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Publication numberUS1637897 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 2, 1927
Filing dateMar 24, 1924
Priority dateMar 24, 1924
Publication numberUS 1637897 A, US 1637897A, US-A-1637897, US1637897 A, US1637897A
InventorsEddins Sextus A
Original AssigneeCordo Hyde Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe and process of making the same
US 1637897 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1 e37 897 s. A. EDDINS SHOE AND PROCESS OF MAKING THE SAME Filed March 24. 1924 Patented Aug. 2, 1927.

UNITED STATES "PATENT ()FF I'CEQfp SEXTUS A. EDDINS, OF QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO CORDC-HYDE (10., CO PARTNERSHIP CONSISTING OF FRANCIS HANNIGAN, OE BRAINTREE, MASSA- CHUSETTS, AND SEXTUS A. EDDINS, F QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS.

' SHOE AND PROCESS OFTJIAKING THE SAME.

Application filed March 24, 1924. Serial-No. 701,285.

This invention relates to shoes and to processes of manufacturing shoes.

In a copending application filed of even date herewith, Serial No. 701,284, I have described and claimed a novel device for supporting theupper of a shoe at opposite sides thereof for the purpose of reducing the tendency of the upper to sag or become misshapen, and to enable it to retain its smooth fit and stylish appearance for a much longer period than otherwise would be possible. This device is intended especially for use in womens low cut shoes such as Oxfords, pumps, strap pumps, and similar styles. In all of these shoes the portions of the upper adjacent to the top of the shoe tend to stretch and sag after a relatively short period of wear, thus giving the shoe an un- The device above.

attractive appearance.

mentioned is designed to support these parts of the upper and it tends to preserve the neat and dressy appearance which the shoe originally presents.

The present invention deals with the problem of building this supporting, device into the shoe, more particularly a welt shoe, and it aims to improve both the shoe constructions and also the processes of manufacturing shoes with a View to incorporating such n a support in a shoe in an economical and entirely satisfactorymanner. w

The nature of the invention willlbe readily understood from the following'description -when read in connection wtih the accom will be particularly pointed out in the ap pended claims. I

Referring now to the drawings,

Figure 1 is a perspective View of a shoe in the process of manufacture showing certain of the steps in the method devised by this invention Fig.2 is a transverse, cross-sectional view ofthe shoe shown in Fig. 1 {and Fig. 3 is a perspectiveview of the shoe supporting device.

For a complete descriptionof the construction and functions of the supporting device shown in the drawings, reference should be made to my copending application above designated. For the purposes ofthe present invention it may be stated that this .tween the upper and the end of theshoe. panying drawings, and the novel features device is made of some thin, stiff, resilient sheet material, such as sheet celluloid having a thickness of,,say, twenty thousandths of an; inch, or thereabouts. The device compr ses two wings 2 and 3 connected byv a bridge 4:, the wings being of such shape and extent as to reinforce and support the upper of the shoe throughout the greater part of the region between the shank and forepart at opposite sides of the shoe. The bridge connects the lower edges of the'wings and preferably is formed integral with them.

lreferably, also, the bridge is shouldered tacked on the bottom of a last 6, and the other parts of the shoe are assembled on thelast in the usual manner. .These parts Wlll include an upper 7 and a lining therefor. In the shoe shown the lining is made double through the forepart and includes cloth pieces 8 and 9,.and the innermost of these cloth sections is stitched to a leather lining 10 for the heel portion of the shoe. The usual counter stiffener 12 is located belining at the heel After these parts have been assembled the fore-part of: the shoe is lasted, as shown in Fig. 1. Next the lower section Z) of the insole is turned up and the lining in the shank portion. of the shoe is pulled over the upper section a of the insole and secured in sub-' stantially its final position. This securing operation'may be performed simply by pasting or cementing the lining to the insole, or the opposite edges of the lining may be sewed or whipped together. Next the wings 2 and 3 of the supporting device are slipped into theshoe between the lining and the upper and the bridges is pressed down on the'outer surface of-the insole section a, or, more correctly, on the surface of the linging 8 which has been pulled over and secured to the portion a of the insole. The bridge is V the lining projecting upwardly around the' edge of the insole section Z). If desired, this cutting operatlonmay be performed before the lining is cemented to the insole, as above described, or before the assembling opera tion. After the outer section Z) ofthe insole has been turned down it should be tacked or cemented to the heel seat portion of the innersection a, and the lasting operation may then be completed. The lasting of the heel seat will result insecuring the two sections of the insole firmly together. The shoe may then beflwelted and'the other making operations performed in accordance with the usual practice.

Assoon as the outer section of the insole has been turned back into its final position, the fact that the insole is split, or that there is a supporting or reinforcing device in the shoe, need-be nolonger considered, and the remaining manufacturing operations on the shoe can be carried OILjUSt as thoughno supporting device were used in the shoe. The insole need only be splitfar enough for-- ward toallow the placing of the supporting device in the proper position.

The wings 2 and 3 of the device are molded to theshape of the last on which the shoe is made, so that the outline ofthese wings will not be seen in the finished shoe. The wings will, however, perform the function of supporting the. upper in its original position and thus preservethe smooth fit and stylish appearance of the shoe much longer thjanotherwise. would be the case.

It will be evident from the foregoing description that the present invention provides a shoe construction and a process of manufacturing shoes which permits the incorporation of a supporting device in the shoe at only a trifling increase in the expense of manufacture and with a minimum of change in the ordinary commercial manufacturing processes. No change in the machinery ordinarily employed in the manufacturing processes is required by this invention. 1

Having thus described my invention, what I desire to claim as new is: a

1. A; shoe including an insole, an upper securedto said insole, a lining for said up- )er and a sun aort for said no 381' com aris- 7. i l v v ing two. wings ofthin, stiff, resilient sheet material fitting between the lining and up pen of thesshoe and supporting the upper in the region between. the heel and forepart at opposite sides of the shoe, said support in- 1 per, and a supportfor the uppercomprising two wings of thin, stiff, resilient sheet material, saidiwings fitting between the lining and upper of the shoe in the region between the heeland forepart at opposite sides of the shoe and tending to hold the upper in its original shape, and. a bridge connecting the lower, edges of said wings and extending under the portion of the insole on which the foot bears in the shank of the shoe, said bridge being shouldered at its opposite sides to fit snugly over the corresponding edges ofthe insole.

8. A shoe including an insole, an upper securedto said insole, a lining for said up per, and a support for the upper of said shoe, saidsupport comprising two wingsof thin, stiff, resilient sheet material fittingbetween the lining and upper of the shoe at opposite sides thereof and tending to hold the upper in its original shape, each of said wings extending from a point in the wide portion of the heel forward to a pointnear' the junction of the shank and forepart, and extending from adjacent to the edge of the insole up to a point opposite the upper part of the shoe, and a bridge connecting the lower edges of said wings and integral with them, said bridge extending under the part of theinsole on which thefoot-bears in the shank ofthe shoe, each of said wings extending forward for a substantial distance beyond 2 their point! of connection with the bridge.

l. Ina an upper secured to said insole, a lining for said upper, the shank portion of: said'insole being divided into upper a'ndlowersections, an'd a support for the upperiofzthe shoe comprising two wings located between theilining and upper at opposite sidesoftheshoe, andafibridge connecting the lower edges of said wings and located between the sections of said insole. i i y 5. In aushoe, the combination ofan insole, an uppersecured-to. said insole, a lining for saidupper, the shank portion of said insolebeing divided into upperandlower sections, and supportwfor the upper of the shoe comprising two wings of thin, stifit', TGSlllBnl), sheet material fitting between the lining and upper of the shoe'and supporting theiupper iinthe region, between the heel and forepart atvoppositesides of the shoe, said support including a bridge connecting the loweredgesofsaidwings and holding; them intheir operativepositions, said bridge being located between thesections of {said insole.

shoe, the combination of an insole,

6. In a shoe, the combination of an insole, 1 an upper secured to said insole, a lining for said upper, the shank portion of said insole being divided into upper and lower sections, the lining in the shank portion of the shoe being secured between said upper and lower sections of the insole, and a support for the upper of the shoe comprising two wings of thin, stiff, resilient sheet material fitting between the lining and upper of the shoe and supporting the upper in the region between the heel and forepart at opposite sides of the shoe, said support including a bridge connecting the lower edges of said wings and located between the sections of said insole.

7. That improvement in the process of manufacturing shoes, which consists in providing an insole having the shank portion thereof divided into upper and lower sections; assembling the parts of a shoe, including said insole and the upper and lining, on a last; providing a support for the upper of a shoe having wings and a bridge connecting said wings; inserting the wings of said support between said upper and lining at opposite sides of the last with the bridge overlying the upper section of said insole; fastening the lower section of said insole in place; and then completing the manufacture of the shoe in any suitable manner.

8. That improvement in the process of manufacturing shoes, which consists in providing an insole which is split from its heel end substantially through the shank portion thereof to provide upper and lower insole sections; assembling said insole with p p the upper and lining of a shoe on a last;

providing an upper supporting device including two wings and a bridge connecting them; turning up the lower section of said insole; inserting the wings of said supporting device between said upper and lining at opposite sides of the last with said bridge lying on the upper section of the insole; turning the lower section of said insole down into its normal position and fasteningit in said position; and then completing the manufacture of the shoe in any suitable manner.

9. That improvement in the process of manufacturing shoes, which consists in providing an insole which is split from its heel end substantially through the shank portion thereof to provide upper and lower insole sections; assembling said insole with the upper and linging of a shoe on a last; roviding an upper supporting device inclu two wings and abridge connecting them; turning up the lower section of said insole;

securing the lining on the shank portion of the inner section of the insole in substantially its final position; inserting the wings of said supporting device between said upper and lining at opposite sides of the lastwith the bridge lying across the upper section of said insole; securing said bridge in said position, turning the lower section of the insole down into its normal position-and fastening it there; and then completing the manufacture of the shoe in any suitable manner.

SEXTUS A. 'EDDINS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2456102 *Mar 29, 1946Dec 14, 1948Joseph AgostinelliHeel counter reinforcement
US4947560 *Feb 9, 1989Aug 14, 1990Kaepa, Inc.Split vamp shoe with lateral stabilizer system
US5438769 *Mar 17, 1993Aug 8, 1995Alpine Stars S.P.A.Ankle supporting device, particularly for motorcycling boots
US5896608 *Mar 7, 1997Apr 27, 1999Whatley; Ian H.Footwear lasting component
US6041525 *Aug 12, 1998Mar 28, 2000Artemis Innovations Inc.Footwear grinding apparatus with flanking bearing surfaces
US6154983 *Dec 30, 1998Dec 5, 2000Basketball Marketing Company, Inc.Lottery shoe and method of making same
US6256824 *Sep 27, 2000Jul 10, 2001Basketball Marketing Company, Inc.Method of making a lottery shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/91, 12/142.00N, 36/69, 36/166
International ClassificationA43B23/02, A43B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/18, A43B23/02
European ClassificationA43B13/18, A43B23/02