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Publication numberUS1639115 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1927
Filing dateJul 10, 1924
Priority dateJul 10, 1924
Publication numberUS 1639115 A, US 1639115A, US-A-1639115, US1639115 A, US1639115A
InventorsHarry F Smith
Original AssigneeGas Res Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stove
US 1639115 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. F. SMITH STOVE Aug. 16, 1927. 1,639,115

Filed July 10, 1924 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 llll 52M; WLM www il l) Patented Aug'. `16, 1927.

unirsesrArs-sqs-ATENT OFFICE.

HARRY F. SMITH, OF DAYTON, OHIO; ASSIGNOR TO THEv GAS RESEARCH C(ltill-HWY,y OF DAYTON, OHG', A CORPORATION O-F OHIO.

STOVE.

Application filed July 10.

The presentinvention relates to gas stoves.

One of the principal object-s of the invention is to provide a stove'for burning gaseous fuels, having valve and burner elements permitting the utilization ofy fuels of Widely varying characteristics. Another object of the present invention is to provide such a stove with a combined gas valve and manifold for use With either natural gas or producer gas.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection With the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig, 1 is a plan view of a stove, and source of fuel supply therefrom, constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the gas man1- fold and associated valves, forming part of the stove shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a plan View of the manifold and valves, portions thereof being broken'ayvay on the irregular section indicated by the line 3-3 of Fig. 2; Y

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal vertical section on the line 4 4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged vertical cross section on the line 5 5 of Fig. 2; and

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 5, showing a modified forni of manifold and valve.

Gras stoves, asy heretofore Widely in use, have used either natural gas or city gas as l fuel. In recent years the use of natural gas as a domestic fuel has increased in tremendous proportions, and many sections of the county,-such for instance as the Middle lVest and SoutliWest,-rely almost entirely upon natural gas as a. domestic fuel for cooking. But as is Well known the supply of natural gas, With reference to thel demand, is constantly decreasing. This has caused considerable inconvenience, and even suffering in those regions depending upon natural gas for fuel; for in the Winter Whenthe demand is particularly heavy the supply is frequently inadequate, so much so that it` is often impossible to secure enoughgas for cooking purposes.

In order to assist in ameliorating this condition applicant has devised l a small gas producer, for domestic use, which is adapted to supply a producergas for all of the usual purposes to which natural gas or-city gas are generally put. But because of the verydif- 1924. LSerial No. 725,172.

ferent characteristics of natural gas and producer gas, producer gas Will ordinarily not function satisfactorily in stove burners as heretofore designed for using natural gas. For example, it has been found, that producer gas Will not ordinarily burn'satisfacwill give substantially the lsame heating ef- F feet as natural gas, despite the big disparity 1n the relative heat values. But in order to pass a sufficient quantity of producer gas through the orifices of a natural gas burner, to deliver the desired number of heat units in the gas burned, too high a velocity of ioW, is attained at the burner, and this has heretofore caused the use of separate installations Where it Was ydesired to use natural gas for cooking, so long as available, and to use rproducer gas as a supplementary fuel.

But it has been found that if av burner is provided with sufliciently large orifices to give the desired lovv velocity of flow for producer gas, such a burner Will also function satisfactorily and efhciently in the burning of natural gas. And this discovery made possible the present invention, in Which the gas stove 10 is provided with burners 11, the orifices of Which are materially larger' than those ordinarily used in burners as heretofore designed`v this burner being connected through suitable conduits to the delivery pipe 12 of a gas producer illustrated diagrammatically at 13, and also throughI the conduit 14 to a suitable source or supply, of natural gas.

Fach of the conduits 12 and 14 may be directly connected to the burners of the stove' with sui-table control valves, but Vpreferably' they are connected to a gas Vmanifold or 'tu'- bular memberl 20 liavingone or more gasr valv-es 21 at the rearof the manifold, tneslgas valves being;` adapted to be connected with suitable gas burners. Themanifold herein illustrated is shown as having fourgas valves connected therewith but it Will,- be understoodthat any `numbermayl be 'used`vv and further that when so desired a supple-- mental manifold 22'having additional gas valves may be connected to the end of the manifold 20. -For the purpose of connecting the manifolos they may each be provided with suitable half-bosses Which lit together to form bosses 23 the latter being engaged by suitable clamps 24 and bolts 25 for holding` the manifolds in proper relative position.

The manifold 2O is provided with a horizontally disposed longitudinally extending partition 26 which divides it into a lower passage 27 adapted to receive producer gas through pipe l2, and an upper passage 29 adapted to receive natural gas through the pipe 14. The upper passage 29 is subdivided by means of a vert-ical longitudinally eX- tending partition 3l and short transversely extending partitions 32 to provide air passages 33 Which communicate with the atmospnere through ports 34, the opening of these ports being adjustable by means of the pivoted plates 35. Wvhile an air passage 33 and suitable ports 35 have been provided for each of the gas valves 2l it will be understood that certain of the partitions 32 may be omitted whereby two or more air passages 33 may' be combined, and in such event one or more of the ports 34 may also be omitted as desired.

Referring particularly to Fig. 5 the gas valve is shown as having a gas valve casing 36 consisting of the cover 37 and the cooperating parts of the manifold 20. rlhe rear Wall of the manifold .is provided with an outwardly extending circular boss 38 having a flat valve .seat portion 39 adapted to cooperate With the plate or dise valve or member 40. The cover 3? lits snugly over the boss 33 and its outer end is contracted to form a discharge opening 4l which is adapted to be connected to a suitable gas burner.

Opposite each valve casing the horizontal partition 26 is provided with bosses 42 each having a central tapered aperture or opening 43 adapted to receive the valve or turn plug 44. The turn plug 44 is provided with a central longitudinal passage 45 having a branch 46 which is adapte-d to register with the port or passage 47 formed in the Wall of the natural gas passage 29. Threadedly mounted upon the inner end of the turn plug and in cooperation with the passage 45 is an apertured spud 43 by means of which the amount of gas which passes through the central aperture 45 is determined. The inner end of the turn plug 44 projects Well into the valve easing 36, as shown, in order that thenatural gas coming through the passage 45 may be introduced into the interior of the valve casing at a point most suitable for throwing in air from passage 33 and causing its proper admiXture with the gas, Intermediate the spud 43 and the valve plate 40 which is slidable but nenrotatable upon the turn plug 44 there is mounted a spring 49 which is adapted to hold the valve plate 40 against the seat 39 and the plug 44 to its seat in the tapered aperture 43. rlhe valve plate 40 is provided with a port or passage 50 which is adapted to cooperate with the ports or passages 5l and 52 formed in the valve seat 39. Willen the port 50 registers With the port 5l then the air passage 33 is connected to the interior of the valve casing 36, and at the same time the natural gas passage 29 is in communication with the interior of the valve casing 36. But When the port 50 is in register With the port 52 then both the air pas-A` sage and the natural gas passage are not connect-ed to the interior of the cover 36 and so the supply of natural gas and air is cut olf from the cooperating burner, producer gas being then supplied the burner.

rlhe turn plug 44 is provided With an operating handle 53 by which it may be turned to one of its several positions, the movement of the handle 53 in a counterclockwise direction being limited by the fixed stop 54 and its movement in a clock- Wise direction being limited by the fixed stop 55. To admit natural gas to the gas valve the valve stem is moved to the position shown in Fig. 5 in which position the valve handle 53 is against the stop 54 as best shown in Fig. 2. In this position the valve functions on the induction principle and natural gas is admitted to the gas valve from passage 29 through the ports and passages 4T, 46 and 45, the required air for forming a suitable combustible mixture passing in through the port 34, air passage 33 and ports 51 and 50. The relative amounts of natural gas and of air required for a suitable mixture may be more or less permanently adjusted by means of the spud 48 andv the cover plate 35, it being understood that thereafter the amount of gas admitted for immediate requirements is controlled by turning the valve stem 44 in its seat as is customary in the common types of valves for use With natural gas.

`When it is desired to shut off the supply of natural gas the handle 53 isturned doivn Wardly to the position shovvn at the extreme right of Fig. 2. A spring stop 56 is secured, as by means of a Vscreiv 57 to the lower portion of the manifold 20, the end of the spring stop 56 lying in the path of movement of the handle 53. VWhen the apparatus is to be used `vvith natural gas the handle 53 is limited ln its movement by the fixed stop 54 and the spring stop 56.V Should it be desired to use the apparatus With producer gas then the spring stop 56 may be drawn downwardly out of the path ofthe handle 53 thereby permitting the latter to pass to the left of the spring stop 56. lo

admit producer gas to the gas-valve the handle 53 is moved toward the xedzstop 55. When moved `to bring the handle against the stop 55, the port in the valve plate registers with the port 52 -in the ,producer gas passage 27, the ports 5l and 47 ybeing nowclosed, the producer gas thuspassing to the burner without the admixture of air, this being the. condition ordinarily required for proper burning 'of producer gas.

Fig. shows a second form of the invention similar in general arrangement to the form shown in Figs. 2 to: 5 but differing therefrom in various details of construction. This form of the .invention is provided with a conical valve member 58 formedvintegrally with the valve stem 59 the bearing portion of the latter being cylindrical as indicated at 60. The conical valve member. 58 cooperates with a similarly shaped .valve seat 6l having a port at 52 communicating `with. the air passage 33 and a port at63 communicating with the producer gas passage 27, Valve member 58 is provid-ed with a port 64 which is adapted to register with either yof the ports 62 and 63 depending on the position to which the valve stem is turned.

The valve stem is provided with a central port or passage 65 which connects with a branch port or passage 66 opening through the surface of the valve .member 58, this branch port being adapted to register with the port or passage 67 connected with the natural gas passage 29vand opening through the surface of the valve seat 6l. The valve stem carries at its end the threaded apertured spr-.d 48, which projects well into the valve casing 36 and is arranged to discharge natural gas from the passage 29 into he valve casing 36 near the throat or contracted portion of the latter whereby the natural gas may be properly7 mixed with the incoming air entering from the air passage 33. The valve member 58 is held to its seat 6l by means of the spring 68 around the valve stem 60.

The form of gas manifold and valve illustrated in Fig. 6 is operated in substantially the same manner as the form shown in Figs. 2 to 5, that is, to admit naturalgas the operating handle 53 is moved between the spring stop 56 and the fixed stop 54, and when Fit is desired to admit producer gas the operating handle is moved between the spring stop 56 and the fixed stop 55, Figure 6 shows the position of the ports when the operating handle 53 is against the fixed stop 54 and natural gas is being admitted to the valve.

It has `been found that certain metals are corroded in the'presence of producer gas yand as a consequence such metals are not suitable for use in gas valves designed for producer In Fig. 6 both the manifold 2O andthe turnv plug; containing the cooperating valve nie1nber'58 and seat 61 are shown as made of aluminum, this being a metal which is generally not corroded by producer gas. It has been discovered that `there is a ydecided tendency for cooperating sliding parts to seize unless they lare lubricated. When the yangle between the surface of the conical valve member and the axis of the valve stem is less than a certain amount then, both the valve member yand the valve seat being made of aluminum, the valve lmember will seize or :bind against the valve seat under the pressure of the spring 68' even though the cooperating surfacesy arc thoroughly lubricated. In Fig. 6 tliesurface of the conical valve sea-t is inclined .at an angle of substantially 45 degrees from the axis of thevalve stem. This angle has proven very satisfactory for practical operation. It will be understood that thisv anglefniay be increased to any desired extent vand it maybe decreased .to aflimited extent the limiting angle, thatis, theanglefbelow which it is impractical to construct a valve without seizing or sticking of the cooperating aluminum parts, beingabout 25 degrees.

While such parts of the gas valve as have working or sliding surfaces exposed to the act-ion of the producer gas are preferably made of aluminum, it willbe understood that the parts. maybe made of other metals which resist the action of producer` gas as for example tin, lead or certain .alloys of either of these metals. 'Thus in Fig. 5 the manifold which hasithe valve seat formed thereon is formed of aluminum and the cooperating valve member or plate 40 is made of a tin-lead .alloy commonly known Babbitt metal.

From the above description it will be apparent that the present invention provides a gas stove having the valves, burners, etc. so constructed as to permit the utilization of fuels of widely differing characteristics, such as natural gas and producer gas, without the removal or readjustment of any of the parts, a compact unitary gas valve and gas manifold of novel construction adapted to operate with either natural or producer gas which is simple in operation land construction and which is inexpensive to manufacture.

hile the yfor-ms of apparatus herein de@ scribedconstitute preferred embodiments of the invention, it is to be understood that the invention isv not .limited to these precise forms of apparatus, and that changes may be madein either without de'partingfrom the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. In a stove of the character described, a

'aA conduit for-supplying natural gas kor the aluminum lli) like to said burner, a conduit for supplying producer gas, or the like to said burner, an air passage opening to atmosphere, a valve for controlling communication of said natural gas conduit and said air passage With said burner element, said valve being constructed to effect an induction action, and a valve for controlling communication of said producer-gas Conduit With said burner element, said valves being constructed to selectively control the supply of the respective gases to said burner element.

Y 2. In a stove of the character described, a burner element, constructed to burn natural gas or the like, or producer gas or the like, a manifold having a passage for conducting natural gas or the like, and a second passage for conducting producer gas or the like, and control means for placing either passage independently into operative communication with the burner.

3. An apparatus of the character described comprising, in combination, a burner element, a control valve therefor, means associated with the control valve and having a passage adapted to conduct natural gas and a second passage adapted to conduct producer gas, and means for placing either' of said passages in communication With the control valve, said means having provisions for connecting the interior of the control valve With the atmosphere While the first mentioned passage is in communication With the control valve.

el. An apparatus of the character described comprising, in combination, al burner element, a control valve therefor, means associated With the control valve and having a passage adapted to conduct natural and a second passage adapted to conduct pros ducer gas, an operating handle for said control valve, and a stop in the path of said handle adapted for positioning to permit free movement of the valve with respect to either of said passages but to limit its movement With respect to the other passage, said stop being movable out of the path of said handle to permit movement of the control from operative connection With one of said passages to the other.

5. An apparatus of the character described comprising, in combination, a burner element, a control valve therefor, comprising a casing having ports and passages for conducting natural gas, producer gas and air respectively and adapted to be placed in communication With the interior of said casing, and a single means for concurrently controlling the communication of said ports and passages with the casing.

6. An apparatus of the character described comprising, in combination, a burner element, a control valve therefor, comprising a casing having ports and passages for conducting natural gas, producer gas and air respectively and adapted to be placed in communication with the interior of said casing, and means for concurrently controlling the communication of said ports and passages with the casing, said means including sages With the casing, said means including a turn plug for controlling one of the ports and passages to admit natural gas to the casing, and an integral tapered valve member carried by said turn plug and adapted to control the remaining ports and passages.

8. An apparatus of the character described comprising, in combination, a burner element, a control valve therefor, comprising a casing having ports and passages for conducting natural gas, producer gas and air respectively and adapted to be placed in communication with the interior of said casing, and means for concurrently controlling the communication of said ports and lpassages With the casing, said means including a valve plug, a valve member longitudinally slidable on the valve stem and adapted to control certain of said ports and passages, and spring means for holding the valve member' to its seat.

9. An apparatus of the character described comprising, in combination, a `burner element, a control valve therefor, comprising a casing having ports and passages for conducting natural gas, producer gas and air respectively and adapted to be placed in communication with the interior of said casing, and means for concurrently controlling the communication of said ports and passages With the casing, said means including a turn plug projecting into the valve casing and adapted to control the admission of natural gas to the casing, and a valve member carried by the valve stem and adapted to control the admission of air and producer gas to the casing.

10. An apparatus of the character described, comprising a burner having a fuel supply passage connected thereto, a plurality of gas valves, a manifold for said valves, said manifold having a longitudinally en tending partition providing passages adapted to conduct natural and producer gas, and another partition providing an air passage for one of the valves, and means for placing one or more of the passages in communication With the burner fuel supply passage through said valves. h

l1. An apparatus of the character -described, comprising a burner having a fuel supply passage connected thereto, a plurality of gas valves, a manifold for lsaid valves, said manifold having a longitudinally eX- tending horizontally disposed partition providing passages for 'natural and producer gas, and a vertically disposed Wall extending longitudinally of the said natural gas pas- .sage to provide an air passage, and means for placing one or more of the passages in communication with the burner fuel supply passage through said valves.

l2. In a cooking stove, a burner element adapted to use natural gas or artificial gas, such as producer gas land the like, a manifold, a partition in said manifold dividing it. into two independent passages, one of Which is adapted for connection to a source of supply of natural gas, and the other to a source of supply. of producer gas or the like, a valve fitting associated with each of .said passages, a fuel supply pipe connecting said fitting to the burner, and a valve Within said itt-ing adapted for positioning to connect the producer gas side of said manifold to the burner While disconnecting the burner from the natural gas side, or for connecting the natural gas side to the burner While disconnecting the producer gas side from the burner, said valve casing also having a passage connected to the air controlled by said valve which air passage is opened at the same time as the burner is connected to the natural gas side of the mainifold and is closed When the burner is connected to the producer gas side.

13. In a cooking stove of the character described, a burner adapted to use natural gas or producer gas and the like, a fuel suping, and an air inlet opening, an extension 4on said valve casing connected to the fuel supply pipe, a valve in said casing having an extension with a passage therein, which extension is positioned Within the eXtension on the valve casing to form in effect an injector, the air inlet opening of the casing being adapted for connection to the said casing extension, the passage in the valve extension being adapted for connection With the natural gas inlet opening, and the producer gas inlet opening also leading into the said valve case extension, and means for positioning the' valve to connect the producer gas inlet opening to the extension While disconnecting the natural gas inlet opening and the air inlet opening from the said extension, or to disconnect the producer gas inlet opening from the extension and connect the air opening to the case extension, and the natural gas inlet opening to the passage in the valve extension.

14;. In a gas cooking stove, a burner element adapted for the utilization of natural gas or producer gas and the like, a supply pipe connected to said burn-ena natural gas supply pipe, a supply pipe for producer gas or the like, an air passage opening to atmosphere, and a single control valve for connecting the producer gas pipe to the supply pipe of the burner, or for connecting the natural gas pipe and the air passage to the supply pipe of the burner to supply a mixture of natural gas and air to said burner.

In testimony whereof I hereto affix my signature.

HARRY F. SMITH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7967005 *Apr 14, 2008Jun 28, 2011Daniel ParrishDual fuel gas valve and gas grill
US8241034 *Mar 13, 2008Aug 14, 2012Continental Appliances Inc.Fuel selection valve assemblies
US8613276May 23, 2011Dec 24, 2013Daniel ParrishDual fuel gas valve and gas grill
US8752541Jun 7, 2011Jun 17, 2014David DengHeating system
US8764436 *Oct 26, 2012Jul 1, 2014Procom Heating, Inc.Valve assemblies for heating devices
US8851065Jun 7, 2011Oct 7, 2014David DengDual fuel heating system with pressure sensitive nozzle
US20080223465 *Mar 13, 2008Sep 18, 2008David DengFuel selection valve assemblies
US20130149652 *Oct 26, 2012Jun 13, 2013Continental Appliances, Inc. D.B.A. ProcomPilot assemblies for heating devices
WO2007022772A1 *Aug 22, 2005Mar 1, 2007Danfoss AsA burner assembly comprising a plurality of burner nozzle units
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/625.16
International ClassificationF24C3/08, F23D14/64, F23D14/66
Cooperative ClassificationF23D2900/14641, F23D14/64, F23D14/66, F24C3/085
European ClassificationF23D14/64, F24C3/08B, F23D14/66