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Publication numberUS1639118 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 16, 1927
Filing dateSep 24, 1925
Priority dateSep 24, 1925
Publication numberUS 1639118 A, US 1639118A, US-A-1639118, US1639118 A, US1639118A
InventorsMerton L Dodge, Troyer Nelson
Original AssigneeMerton L Dodge, Troyer Nelson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Can-end-lining machine
US 1639118 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1,639,118 1927' N. TROYER ET AL CAN END LINING MACHINE Filed Sept. 24, 1925 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR g NEL50N T'POYEI? NE}? ra/g Z. D0065 g N. TROYE'R ET AL CAN END LINING MACHINE Filed Sept. 24 1925 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR NELSON T9075? Mffirg/v Z. D0065 6M4, TORNEY 16 19 Aug 27 N. TROYER ET AL CAN END LINING MACHINE Filed Sept. 24, 1925 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTO R5 N51. 50/\/ 7/?0 Yfl? NERTo/Y 12. D0065 16 1927 N. TROYER ET AL CAN END LINING MACHINE Filed Sept. 24, 1925 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 TR DN .m I A mm W g 927 N. TROYER ET AL CAN END LINING MACHINE Filed Sept. 24, 1925 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Aug. 16, 1927.

N. TROY ER ET AL CAN END LINING MAQHINE Filed Sept, 24, 1925 e Sheets-Sheet e III I INVENTORS llll/ NELs'oN 7R0 YER Narrow L.Dope

Patented Aug. 16, 1927.

UNETED STATES PATENT @FFlQE.

CAN-END-LINING MACHINE.

Application filed September 24, 1925. Serial No. 58,429.

This invention relates to improvements in compound applying machines, and more particularly to machines known as lining machines which are designed for applying a sealing compound to the flanged or grooved edges of covers or ends for tin cans to insure the integrity of the joint when the ends are seamed onto the can bodies.

It is the principal object of the present invention to provide a lining machine of the above character embodying improved 'details of construction whereby this work may be done at a greater rate than was previously possible, and whereby the applying of the compound will be done evenly, satisfactorily and without waste of material.

It is also an object of the invention to provide an end lining machine embodying a revolubly mounted table and head equipped with a plurality of compound applying units to which theends are successively delivered as the table revolves; each of said units comprising a set of rotatably driven pads between which the ends are clamped durin the lining process, and a nozzle from whic l the compound is delivered from a source of supply under the control of a cam actuated valve mechanism that opens the nozzle for a short interval between the time of receiving and of discharging the ends from between the pads.

Another object of the invention is toprovide means for preventing the opening of the valves and the discharge of the sealing compound in the event that an end is not in position to receive it.

A further object is to provide a machine of the above character in which the several compound feed nozzles are supported by 'means that is adjustable relative to the end holding pads so as to provide for an easy and quick adjustment to adapt the machine for the lining of ends of different diameters.

Other objects of the invention reside in the various details of construction and combination of parts as is hereafter described.

In accomplishing these objects we have provided the improved details of construc- Earn. the preferred forms of which are illusarated in the accompanying drawings, wherein- Fig l is a side elevation of a machine embodying an end lining mechanism in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the machine;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional iiew taken substantially on the line 3-3 in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken centrally through the liner head;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of the liner head and its supporting turret showing the disposition of the four units thereon;

Fig. 6 is a horizontal section taken on line (3-6 in Fig. 4;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged plan view of the compound applying units as shown in Fig. 5, parts of which are broken away for better illustration;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged vertical section through one set of pads and their supporting members and a sectional detail of the adjacent compound feed nozzle and valve control mechanism;

Fig. 9 is an enlarged, detail view partly in section, of the valve control mechanism and its latch;

Fig. 10 is a similar view showing the latch released to avoid opening of nozzle when there is no end in place to receive the compound therefrom;

Fig. 11 is a plan view of the latch mechanism; and

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of the type of can end to be lined by the present machine.

Referring more in detail to the several views of the drawings In Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawings, we have shown the present end lining machine as combined with a dryer by means of which the compound, after being applied to the ends, is dried. The dryer forms no part of the present invention and will be only briefly referred to as it has been described in detail in a co-pending application. The end liner and dryer are mounted within a frame, or bed plate, 1, supported at a suitable heightby legs 2 at its corners. At one side of the bed plate is an integral, lateral projection 3 on which is mounted a feed mechanism which operates to deliver the can ends, one at a time, into the liner from which they are discharged into a guideway 4 and delivered by a revolubly driven turret 5 into the dryer 6 from which they are ultimately delivered after an interval of time during which the compound applied thereto is dried.

The feed mechanism preferably would be of that type comprising a vertical guide 7 within. which the can ends are stacked for delivery from the lower end of the .guide into a guideway 8 along which they are advanced by a rotatably driven disk 9 into the path of a turret 10 which operates to deliver them through a guideway 11 to the liner mech-, anism which we have designated as a whole in Fig. 2, by reference numeral 12. The driving mechanism for the feed disk 9 and turret 10 comprises a horizontal shaft 13 provided at its outer end with a pulley 14 about which a driving belt may be extended and at its inner end with a bevel gear 14 that drives a horizontally disposed bevel gear wheel 15 fixed on the lower end of a vertical shaft 16 which, at its upper end, has the turret 1O fixed thereon and which, at about its center has a gear wheel 17 keyed thereon which operates to drive'a gear 18 of like diameter fixed on a vertical shaft 19 which, at its upper end, has the feed disk 9 fixed thereon. The shafts l6 and 19 are rotatably mounted adjacent their upper ends within suitable bearings provided therefor in the bed plate 1 and near their lower ends are likewise mounted in bearings provided in a sub-frame designated by reference numeral 20 which serves also, as is presently disclosed, as the supporting means for the liner post and head and table that are revoluble on the post.

Supported rigidly by the subframe 20 in alinement with the shafts 19 and 16 is the liner post 24 which, as shown best in Figure 4, is rovided at its lower end with a periph eral auge 25 into which studs 25', extended upwardly from the subframe, are threaded to secure the post rigidly in position. This post is of cylindrical form and has its upper half reduced in diameter thereby providing an upwardly facing shoulder 26 on which a liner table 27 is rotatably mounted through the intermediacy of anti-friction bearings 28. The table is of circular form and 0p erates flush with the top surface of the bed plate 1 within a circular opening 29. It has an integral, cylindrical hub portion 30 fitted about the lower end of the 0st, with a suitable bushing 31 interposed etween the two, and has a late-rally projecting flange 32 at its lower end to which an externally toothed ring gear 33 is fixed by bolts 34. The gear 33 is of the same diameter as gears 17 and 18 and operates in mesh with gear 17 so that the table and feed mechanism are thereby synchronized in their revolving movements.

Located within the liner table at equal radial distances from the center and equally spaced from each other are circular openings 37 within which the lower can end sup- Leeaiie' porting pads 38 are located. In the operation of the machine, the can ends E, which are of that type shown in Figure 12, con sisting of a flat disk with a peripheral'groove 12 for receiving the sealing compound, are

delivered one at a time from the supply by the turret 10 onto the pads 38 as they revolve with the liner table. The pads 38 are, as soon as the ends have been delivered thereonto, actuated upwardly to clamp the ends against co-operatively arranged upper pads 39 which, byv mechanism presently described, are being rotated at a high rate as they revolve with the table. At a predetermined time during the revoluble movement of the can ends between the points of receiving and delivery from the liner table, a liquid sealing compound is delivered into the flanged or grooved rims of the ends so that it will be evenly spread and will be caused by centrifugal force to fill the outer vertical wall of the groove.

The manner of mounting the lower pads and means for raising and lowering them as they revolve with the liner table is best shown in Figures 4 and 8, wherein 4O designates cy'lindrically formed slides that are reciprocally movable within cylindrical bores 41 formed in bosses 42 cast integral with the hub portion 30 of the liner table. These bores are co-axially alined with the openings 37 and the slides 40 are individually operable by means of rollers 43, rotatable on spindles 43 mounted in the 'lower end of the slides, and which operate upon a circular cam 44 that is supported concentrically about. the post 24 upon the subframe 20. The liner table is revo'lved in the direction indicated by the arrow thereon in Figure 2. and the can ends travel through an arc of approximately 270 degrees between the re ceiving and discharge points of the liner table. The cam 44 is formed with a raise therein which extends through about 180 degrees and is so located that it actuates each slide upwardly just after an end has been moved by the turret 10 into registration between the pads 38 and 39 of its unit so as to clamp and hold the end between the pads until it approaches the discharge point and is taken up by the turret 5.

The pads 38 are threaded onto the upper ends of spindles 46 which are revolublv mounted coaxially within the upper end portions of the slides 40. A limited, downwardly yieldable movement is provided for in mountmg the spindles 46 through the intermediacy of coiled'supporting springs 47 Hill which are contained within the slides to bea upwardly against anti-friction bearings 48 within which the spindles revolve andwhereby they are supported. As-shown best in Figure 8, the inner ring of the ball race of each bearing 48 is clamped between a shoulder 49 on a spindle 46 and a nut 50 threaded thereon, while the outer ring of the ball race is slidable within the slide and is yieldab'ly retained against a ring nut 52, threaded into the upper end of the slide by the upper end of the coiled spring 47. This yieldable mounting is prdvided in order to insure clamping of the can ends E securely between the upper and lower pads during their period of travel within the liner table and to compensate for variations of thickness or irregularities in the ends.

To protect the lower slide mechanism from drippage of the sealing compound that might accidentally or otherwise occur, we have provided the aprons 54 which are clamped between the pads and upper ends of the spindles and which enclose the upper ends of the slides and their containing bosses as shown in Figure 8.

Mounted on the post 24 above the level of the liner table 27 is a casting having a hub portion 60 with a projecting annular flange 61 about its upper portion formed with four equally spaced heads 62 in which there are vertical, cylindrical bores'63. co-

axially alined with the bores 41 and the circular openings 37 in the liner table. The casting is revoluble on the post 24 on an interposed bushing 64 and is rotatably driven by'the tab'le 27 through a connection consisting of a dowel pin 65 carried by a guide ring 66 that encircles the post between the upper face of the liner table and lower end of the hub of the casting. (See Figure '4.)

Rotatably contained Within the bores 63 of the heads 62 are spindles 68 which have the upper pads 39 threaded onto their lower ends and which, about their upper end portions, have gears 69 formed integral therewith which mesh with the teeth of a gear 70 that is keyed to the upper end portion of the post 24 so that when the four heads 62 are caused to revolveabout the post, the gears 69 will travel on the stationary gear 70 and will thus cause the spindles 68 and pads 39 to rotate on their axis as they revolve with the table, and when the can ends are delivered onto the lower pads 38'and these are lifted against thepads 39 the ends will be rotated rapidly and it is during their rotation that the sealing compound is delivered into their flanges so that it will be spread and evenly distributed. I

The means provided for delivering meas-" ured quantities of the sealing compound to the can ends comprises the nozzles 73, one of which is supported adjacent each set of pads from a disk 74 which encircles the hub 60 and is adjustably secured thereto, as presently described. Each nozzle, as shown in Figure 8, comprises a channeled housing having a threaded shank 75 extended upwardly through the disk 7 4 and locked thereto by a nut 76. Distributing pipes 77 connect with the shanks 75 and these lead upwardly and then radially inward and are connected by nipples 78 with a fitting 79 at the upper end of a feed pipe 80 which extends downwardly through the tuhular post 24: and at its lower end extends within and to a point adjacentthe bottom of a supply tank 81, horizontally disposed beneath the bed plate and wherein air pressure is maintained by a pump 82 operatively connected with shaft 13 to force the liquid sealing compound outwardly therefrom through pipe 80 and into the several distributing pipes 77 to the feed nozzles. The fitting 79 has a removable cover 79" which provides for cleaning of pipe 80.

Each nozzle has a conically tapered discharge tip 85 disposed adjacent to the edge of the upper pad of the unit to which it belongs in position to discharge downwardly into the peripheral groove 12 of an end E held between the pads. The flow of compound from'the nozzles is individually controlled so that it is delivered into the flanges during the interval the ends are rotating. Each nozzle is equipped with a control valve stem 86 that is mounted vertically within the nozzle casing and which has a tapered lower end 87 adapted to seat within the tapered tip 85 to close the discharge opening. The stems extend upwardly through a suitably packed opening in the nozzle housings and are slidable at their upper ends within openins 88 in a disk 90 that is fixed to the lower portion of the fitting 79. As the four liner units revolve with the liner head above the post 24, the valve stems are intermittently lifted, then lowered to discharge some of the compound from the nozzles. This is done by means shown best in Figures 8, 9 and 10 consisting of levers 92 that are pivotally supported, as at 93, between their ends from posts 94 that extend downwardly from the under side of the disk 90. Each lever is equipped at one 'end with a yoke 95; the arms of which have rounded heads 96 at their ends disposed at opposite sides of the valve stem between spaced collars 9797' thereon, and at their opposite end carry rollers 98 adapted to follow within a groove 99 in a cam 100that is fixed on theupper end of post 24 just above the gear wheel 70; a

nut 101 being threaded onto the upper end of the post to retain the parts removably in place. Coiled springs 102 are disposed about the upper ends of the valve stems to bear against disk 90 and downwardly on the collars 97 so as to yieldably retain the valve stems seated. The cam groove 99 is so formed that the lovers 92 will be actuated to lift their stems and open the nozzles for short intervals during the time the can ends are passing between the receiving and dis charge points of the liner table; this interval preferably would be during travel through the second third of the distance between intake and discharge points so as to insure that the ends will be spinning at full speed when the compound is applied and that the compound will be closed off and efiectively spread within the flanges by the spinning before the ends reach the discharge point,

For the purpose of preventing the open ing of the nozzles and the discharge of compound therefrom when can ends are not be ing delivered into the machine, we have provided, in this event, for the release of the posts 94: which support the levers 92, for

' slidable movement in their mountings so that their action by the cam will not impart movement to the valve stems.

By referring to Figures 9 and 10 particularly, it is seen that the posts 94, which support the lovers 92, are slidably contained within guide sleeves 10'5 that are extended within openings 106 in disk 90. Each sleevehas a flange 107 through which screws 108 are extended to secure the same to the disk; During normal operation of the machine, while can ends are being delivered into the machine, the posts 9 1 are retained against downward movement by means of latches 110 which are disposed within vertical slots in the sleeves and are pivotally mounted on pivot pins 111 across the lower ends of the slots. Each of the latches, which are pivoted at their lower ends and extend upwardly substantially parallel with the posts, are provided adjacent their upper ends with shoulder blocks 112 adapted to supportingly engage downwardly facing shoulder 113 on blocks 114 fixed to the upper ends of the posts 94. The latches 110 are normally held in place by short coiled springs 115 disposed between the latch and upstanding flanges 117 on latch plates 118. that are pivotally carried from the opposite ends of pins 111, by legs 119. The ends of the coiled springs seat within sockets provided therefor in the levers and flanges of the plates 118 so that they cannot be displaced. The latch plates 118 lie substantially in horizontal planes and are held in place by the upper ends of stems 120 that extend through slots 116 in the disk 90 and downwardly through the spindles 68 and which at their lower ends have heads 121 fixed thereon. These heads project downwardly through openings 122 in the lower surfaces of the pads 39 and have springs 121 bearing downwardly thereagainrat, as shown in Figures 8 and 9. The construction is such that when the can ends are being delivered between the pads, the heads 121 will he engaged thereby and stems 120 lifted and held so as to retain the latch parts in the position as shown in Fi ure 9. In the event can ends are not being de livered between the pads, the stems 120 stay down so that their upper ends disengage the latch plates 118 and permit them also to stay down. This removes tension from the springs 115 and the latches 110 are caused, due to their overbalanced position augmented by the centrifugal force imparted by revolving of the liner head, to stay disengaged from the posts 91 so that the latch parts then assume the position as shown in Figure 10. When theposts are thus released, rotation of the liner head, and the actuation of the levers 92 incidental thereto will not then impartaction to the valves for the reason thatthe posts are free to slide and the levers pivot between the collars 97-97 of the valve stems. The springs 115 also permit the latches to be manually released from the posts and the nozzles closed by spring 102 bearing downwardly in the valve stems '86, in the event that the machine should stop and some of the valves be held open.

It will be seen by reference to Figure '1 that the latch levers 110 are located at the outer sides of theposts with respect to the center of the liner head so that rotation of the head will retain them released from the posts when ends are not entering the machine. When ends are again delivered into the machine, the stems 120 will be lifted and latch plates raised so as to cause springs 115 to exert pressure against the latches 110 to cause them to bear against their respective parts. lVhen the posts are again lifted, the latch block 112 will snap beneath the shouldcrs .113 of blocks 11 1 to retain the posts elevated. The downward movement of the stems, when ends are not being received into the head, are limited by peripheral flanges 121 on the upper ends of the heads 121, as shown in Figure 9.

in order that the machine may be adapted to the lining of can ends of difl'erent diameters, the casting which supports the our upper pad units is adjustable rotatably with respect to the position of disks 74 and 90 which mount the several nozzles and valve control devices, so as to thereby provide for adjusting the nozzle closer to or farther from the axial lines of the pads as is required to suit ends of any diameter. By referring to Figure 6, it is seen that locking bolts 130 are extended downwardly through the flange 61 and through radial slots 131 in the disk 74 and these have nuts 132 that may be tightened to retain them at any adjusted position. The slots 116 in the disk 90 and through which the stems 120 extend, are also radially formed so as to permit this adjustment and the latch plates118 are also extended Suficicntly to be engaged by the stems under dill'crent positions of adjustment.

With the device so constructed operation would be as follows:

The can ends to be lined are stacked within the guide of the feed mechanism from which they are delivered by the rotating disk nee 9 and turret 10 between the pads of the revolving liner head. As the liner head rotates, the travel of the gears 69 on the fixed gear 70 causes the spindles 68 and pads 39 to be revolved, and as the can ends are delivered successively between the co-acting pads of each unit, the lower pads are lifted upwardly by action of the rollers 43 on the cam 44 and the end are clamped against the upper pads so that they rotate therewith as they revolve with the table. After the ends have been received between the pads, the nozzles are opened to discharge a measured quantity of liquid sealing compound to the flanges thereof; this being done by action of the rollers on cam levers 92 operating in the groove 99 of the cam 100 which raises the valve stems 86 to uncover the openings of the nozzle tips 85 to permit the discharge of the sealing compound which is delivered to the nozzles through pipes 77 and pipe 80 from the supply tank 81 wherein air pressure is maintained to force the compound to the nozzles. The ends continue torevolve until discharged and taken up by the turret 5 whichdelivers them into the dryer, andin this way the compound is distributed even ly over the entire surface of the flange.

Having thus described our invention what we claim as new therein and desire to secure by Letters-Patent, is:

1. In a can-end lining machine, a mounting head, aplurality of sets of rotatable pads carried by the head between which can ends may be held and rotated, a nozzle for each set of pads from which a sealing compound may he discharged onto the can ends and a support for the several nozzles adjustably fixed to the head and whereby the several nozzles may be adjusted toward or from the axes of the pads for thelining of can ends of different diameters.

. 2.- In a can-end lining machine, a revoluhly mounted head. a plurality of sets of rotatable pads carried on the head between which can ends may be held and axially rotated as they revolve, nozzles on the head for the different sets of pads from which a sealing compound may be discharged to the can ends as they rotate, a supply tank for the compound, a rotatable supply pipe. extended from the tank coaxially of the head and feed pipes from the supply pipe to the several nozzles.

3. In a can-end lining machine, a tubular mounting post. a liner head revoluble on the post. a plurality of sets of revoluble pads carried with the head and between which can ends may be held and axially rotatedas they revolve, nozzles carried with the head for the several sets of pads from which a sealing compound may be discharged to the can ends as they rotate, a supply tank for a sealing compound disposed below the head, a supply pipe disposed co-axially of the post and head and extended at its lower end rotatably into the supplytank and feed pipes connected with the upper end of said supply pipe and to the several nozzles; said tank being adapted to maintain air under pressure for the forcible delivery of the compound.

4. In a can-end lining machine, a revoluhle head, a pair of rotatably driven pads carried with the head between which a can. end may be heldand rotated, a nozzle mounted on the head for the delivery of a sealing compound to the can end as it rotates, a valve mechanism for controlling the discharge of compound'from the nozzle, a non-rotative cam, an actuating lever for the valve mechanism adapted to follow and to be actuated by the cam, and means for rendering the connection of the lever with the valve inoperative inthe event that a can end is not in place between the pads at the time the valve mechanism normally would open.

5. In an end lining' machine, a pair of rotatably driven pads between which can ends maybe held and rotated, a nozzle from which a sealing compound may be delivered to the ends as they rotate, means operable to effect the delivery of the compound from the nozzle, a latch for normally sustaining the said delivery means in operative position, and a latch retainer that is dependent for support on can ends delivered between the pads and which is rendered ineffective in the event that it is not so supported and permits the release of the latch and a resultant non-functioning of the compound delivery means.

6'. In an end linin machine, a pair of rotatably driven pads etween which can ends may be clamped and axially rotated, a nozzle from which a sealing compound may be delivered to the ends as, they rotate, latch supported means for timing and controlling the delivery of the compound from the nozzle, and a movably supported stem disposed in position to be engaged by the can ends delivered between the pads and to be shifted by this engagement to retain the latch in place but which will drop to release the latch and effect nonrfunctioning of the compound delivery means in the event can ends are not being delivered to the machine.

7. In a can-end lining machine, a air of rotatably mounted pads between which can ends may be clamped and axially rotated, a tubular spindle for one of said pads, a mechanism operable to deliver a sealing compound to the flanges of the can ends as they rotate, a latch adapted to sustain the said mechanism in operative position and a. stem slidably contained in said tubular spindle and extended beyond the face of the pad supported thereby to be engaged and moved by the receiving of a can end between the pads to a position atwhich it retains the latch in place.

8. In a can-end lining machine, a pair of rotatably mounted pads between which can ends may be clamped and axially rotated, a nozzle from which a sealing compound may be delivered onto the can ends as they rotate and a control for the nozzle comprising a valve stem, a cam, a lever operatively connected with the valve stem and cam, and a slidably mounted post pivotally connected with the lever, a shoulder'on the post, a pivoted latch, adapted to engage the shoulder to prevent sliding of the post and to thereby operatively support the lever, and means sustained in place by can end-s delivered between the pads to normally hold the latch in place.

9. In a can-end lining machine, a pair of rotatably mounted pads between which can ends may be clamped and axially rotated, a tubular supporting spindle for one of said pads, a nozzle from which a sealing compound may be delivered to the ends as they are rotated, a valve stem controlling the flow of compound from the nozzle, a lever operatively connected with the valve stem, a cam for actuatin the lever, a slidably mounted post to which said lever is pivotally fixed, a shoulder on the post, a pivotally mounted latch mechanism engageable with the shoulder to retain the post against movement and to thereby render the cam lever operative, and a stem slidable in the tubular spindle adaptedto be lifted by can ends dehvered between the pads into supporting engagement with the latch mechanism to ho d the latter in supporting contact with the post, said stem being adapted to drop from supporting engagement with the latch mechanism when there is no end between the pads to thereby release the latch from the post so as to render the lever inoperative.

10. In a can-end lining machine, a revoluble head, a pair of pads carried by the head between which ends may be held and axially rotated, a nozzle carried by the head from which a sealing compound may be delivered to the ends asathey rotate, a valve stem for controlling flow from the nozzle, a cam, alever operatively connected at one end with th'evalve stem, a cam follower on the other end of the lever, a post vertically slidable in the head and pivotally connected with the lever, a pivoted latch carried by the head and adapted to lockingly engage the post to prevent slidable movement thereof to thereby render the lever operative for actuating the valve stem, and a member ada ted tobe engaged by a can end delivered 8 tween the pads and to be lifted thereby into position to sustain the latch against the post but releasable by non-delivery of ends to the pads; said latch when not sustained being means releasable from'the post by centrifugal force incidental to rotation of the head.

11. In a can-endliningmachine, a revoluble head, a pair of pads carried by the head between which ends may be held and axially rotated, a nozzle carried by the head from which a sealing compound may be delivered to the ends as they rotate; a valve stem forcontrolling flow from the nozzle, a cam, a lever operatively connected at one end with the valve stem, a cam followeron the other end of the lever, a post vertically slidable in the head and pivotally connected with the lever, a shoulder on thepost, a latch pivot ally mounted-onthe head to engage the shoulder when the post is lifted to its upper limit to prevent slidable movement thereof 7 and to thereby render the lever operative for actuating the valve stem, a pivotally mounted latch plate, a slidably mounted stem having one end in supporting engagement with the latch plate and its other end in position to be engaged by can ends placed between the pads to thereby lift the stem and latch plate, and a spring disposed between the latch plate and latch whereby, when the latch plate is lifted, the latch will be urged toward position for supporting contact with the post shoulder when the post is moved to its upper limit.

12. In an end lining machine, means for holding and axially rotating can ends, a nozzle from which a sealing compound may be delivered to the ends as they rotate, valve actuating mechanism operableto ellect the delivery of the compound from the nozzle, a latch for normally sustaining the said mechanism in operative position, said latch comprising yieldably connected parts which permits closing of the valve when the machine stops in' open position.

13. In a can-end lining machine, a .horizontally revoluble head, a pair of pads carried by the head on vertically alined spindles, and between which can ends may be held and axially rotated, a nozzle carried by the head from which a sealing compound may be delivered to the can ends as they rotate, a valve stem for controlling the flow of compound from the nozzle, a spring yieldably retaining the valve stem in closed position, a cam centrally of the head, a lever op eratively connected at one end with the stem, a cam follower on the other end of the lever, a post mounted for slidable movement in the head and pivotally attached at its lower end with the lever, a downwardly facin shoulder on the upper end of the post, a pivotally mounted latch provided with a shoulder for engaging the post shoulder to support the post at its up er limit of travel, a pivotally mounted late plate having an upturned flange, a compression spring between the said flange and latch, a stem slidably contained within the upper spindle having its t ll 1,aso,11s

upper end in supporting contact with the latch plate and having a head at its lower end engageable by can ends placed between the pads to support the stem to hold the latch mechanismin functional position.

14. In a machine of the character described, a central p0st, a liner table revoluble on the post, a liner head disposed above the -table and revoluble on'the post therewith, a plurality of vertically movable slides mounted in the table circularly about the post, spindles-mounted vertically in said slides, spindles mounted in the head in vertical alinement with the lower spindles, pads carried by the adjacent ends of the paired spindles, a gear fixed-concentric of the post, pinions on the upper splndles in mesh with the fixed gear whereby the spindles will be rotated as the head revolves, a cam fixed below the table concentric therewith, cam folplying a sealing compound to the can en as they rotate.

, 15. A device as in claim 14, wherein the lower spindles are mounted in their slides for yieldable movement in an axial direc tion to compensate for variation in thickness of can ends clamped between the pads.

Signed at Seattle, King County, Washington, this 18th day of July, 1925.

NELSON TROYER. MERTON L. DODGE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2524545 *Oct 2, 1947Oct 3, 1950Dewey And Almy Chem CompCrown closure lining machine
US2573338 *Dec 28, 1948Oct 30, 1951Continental Can CoCan end coating machine
US2601625 *Jun 22, 1948Jun 24, 1952Pacific Can CompanyCan-end maker
US3981652 *Aug 5, 1974Sep 21, 1976Usm CorporationMachine for partly coating articles
US6113333 *May 8, 1998Sep 5, 2000Preferred Machining CorporationApparatus and method for applying sealant to a can lid
US7179333Sep 23, 2003Feb 20, 2007Computrol, Inc.Closure sealant dispenser
US7592033Jul 8, 2004Sep 22, 2009Computrol, IncVariable fluid dispenser
US8261631Aug 19, 2008Sep 11, 2012Computrol, Inc.Rotary machine with separately controllable stations
WO1999058267A1 *May 7, 1999Nov 18, 1999Tracy J FowlerApparatus and method for applying sealant to a can lid
Classifications
U.S. Classification413/61, 413/20
International ClassificationB21D51/46
Cooperative ClassificationB21D51/46
European ClassificationB21D51/46