Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1641280 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 6, 1927
Filing dateJul 14, 1926
Priority dateJul 14, 1926
Publication numberUS 1641280 A, US 1641280A, US-A-1641280, US1641280 A, US1641280A
InventorsJoslin Charles T, Klotz Carl W
Original AssigneeRuss Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sirup pump
US 1641280 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

l,64l,2 Sept 1927' c. 'r. JOSLIN ET AL 80 SIRUP PUMP Filed July 14. 1926 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG.]

IINVENTOR CharIesTJos/in BY Carl W-Klotz ATTORN EYS Sept. 6,192 1 ,641,280

C. T. JOSLIN ET AL SIRUP PUMP Filed July 14. 1926 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR CharlesTJoshn BY Carl N011 80mm & mcm

ATTORNEYS Patented Sept. 6, 1927.

' mares STA rss PATENT orr cs.

CHARLES '1. JOSL'IN, OF CLEVELAND, AND CARL XV ELOTZ, OFPARMA VILLAGE, OHIO, ASSIGNGRS TO THE RUSS MAIIUEACTURI-NG OQMPANY, OF CLE.7ELAND,- OHIO, A

oonroeerron or onro. I i sneer Application filed July 14,

This invention relates to pumps for dispensing sirup and similar liquids from jars and it particularly relates to pumps used in connection with soaa fountains.

The primary object of this invention is to provide a dripless sirup pump that will dispense a measured quantity of sirup at each st oke of the pump.

Another object of the invention is to so design the elements of the pump as to provide a device that can be made of die cast parts with a minimum amount of finishing and fitting.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a simplified mechanism for regulating' the quantity of sirup that is dispensed at each stroke of the plunger.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved form of dripless delivery spout adapted to be used in connection with sirup pumps.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a pump of the above designated chaacter that has no valve parts or drain tubes that are so exposed to the air as to have sugar crystals formed therein.

Pumps for dispensing sirup have previously been proposed in which the sirup is drained back into the sirup ar from the delivery spout of the pump through a supplemental passage, and pumps also have been proposed which regulate the quantity of sirup dispensed at each stroke of the pump.

Such pumps have generally embodied exposed valve parts or supplemental drain passages that were exposed to the air. Sugar deposits soon formed on such parts and rendered them partially or wholly inoperative. The present invention differs from the previously proposed devices in that a relatively small quantity of sirup from the delivery spout is drawn back into the pump through the delivery passage of the pump after each stroke, there being no auxiliary flap valve or other device that establishes connection with a supplemental drainage tube to drain sirup from the delivery spout of the pump. The valve parts of the proposed pump are also completely submerged in the sirup at all times during operation.

Adjustable sleeves for regulating the stroke of the'pump have also previously been proposed. The regulating sleeve herein described is however, of greatly simpli- 1926. Serial No. 122,304.

lied structure that materially reduces the Figure 1 is a longitudinal cross sectional view 01 a dispensing pump constructed in accordance with this invention;

F ig'. 2 is an enlarged view of the pump mechanism and associated valve housing taken substantially on line 2-2 of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the valve housing with the remaining parts of the pump broken away, this section being taken substantially on line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4c is an enlarged side elevational view of a valve adapted to be used in connection with the pump shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a top plan view of the valve shown in Fig. 4; 5

F ig. 6 is an enlarged fragi inentary view taken substantially on line 66 of Fig. 1, showing the form of guice for the upper end of the plunger shaft.

F ig. 7 is an enlarged sectional view of the delivery spout of the pump;

Fig. 8 is a bottom vieW of the delivery end of the spout shown in Fig. 7; and

Fig. 9 is a transverse sectional View taken substantially on line 9--9 of Fig. 7, showing the end portion of the delivery spout.

The pump structure shown in the drawing comprisesa supporting cover plate 11 upon which the pump equipment is mounted and that also constitutes a cover for a sirup jar 12 such as those customarily used in soda cabinets. The cover plate 11 has a depending flange 13 formed around its edge portions that preferably extends over a suitable upstanding flange 14 formed on the sirup jar to seal the jar against dust or impurities entering the sirup container. The pump cylinder and valve mechanism is supported from the cover plate 11 by tubular members 15 and 16. Oneend of the member 15 is connected to the supporting plate 11 and the other end is secured in a suitably recessed lug 17 of the pump mechanism. The tubular member 16 constitutes a delivery tube for conveying sirup from the chamber of the pump to a discharge spout 1.8 through which the sirup is dispensed. The upper end of the tubular member 16 is also secured to the cover plate 11 and to the discharge spout 18.

The lower end of the member 16 is connected to a valve housing 19 of the pump mechanism. The connecting members 1 5 and 16 provide a rigid support for connecting the pump mechanism with the cover plate 11.

The pumping unit comprises a cylinder portion 20 that has a disc valve 21 mounted in its base to control the flow of sirup from the intake tube 22 into the pump cylinder. The disc valve 21 is preferably of thin sheet metal that is held in place by a cage formed of a pair of crossed wires .23. The disc valve is adapted'to normally rest on a valve seat 24. to prevent the return flow of sirup from the cylinder 20 through the intake pipe 22 into the sirup jar 12.

A plunger 25, that has a free working fit within the cylinder 20 is carried at the lower end of an operating shaft 26 that has a recessed knob 27 mounted on its upper end for the convenient use of the attendant. The upper portion of the operating shaft 26 has a stop 28 that engages the under face of a spring housing 29 that is rigidly connected to the cover plate. The partially closed lower end of the spring housing has an aperture formed therein that receives the plunger shaft 26 and that constitutes a guide for the upper end thereof. One side of the operating shaft and one side of the aperture in the spring housing are flattened to prevent rotation of the pump shaft.

A helical spring 30 that is partially housed within the recessed knob 27 and that seats on the partially closed lower end of the housing 29 serves to return the plunger to its uppermost position when released by the attendant.

The spring housing 29 is internally threaded to receive the stroke-adjusting sleeve 31 therein. The upper end of the sleeve 31 is provided with an enlarged head that engages the under face of the knob 27 to adjustably regulate the length of the stroke of the plunger 25. The sleeve may be adjusted to any desired elevation by turning it on the threads of the housing 29. This provides a simple'and convenient mechanism for regulating the quantity of sirup that is dispensed at each stroke of the pump.

The cylinder 20 communicates directly with the valve housing 19 through an open port The valve seat is formed by a hollow open ended removable plug 33 that has an annular groove 3% formed thereis of particular importance is the provision of. a by-pass 38 that may either be formed in the valve casing as shown in F ig; 1 or in. the disc valve 36 as shown in Fig. 4;. and Fig. 5. The function of this by-pass is to withdraw enough sirup from the spout'18 to prevent dripping after each pump stroke.

The by-pass aperture 38 that is formed in the side Wall of the valve housing preferably is so arranged as not to be covered by the valve in any position. This aperture may be formed by casting a shallow groove of the desired cross section in the interior side wall of the valve housing.

The by-pass aperture mav also be formed in the valve head as shown in Fig. 4 and Fig. 5, it being preferable, however, to use only one aperture either in the valve head or in the valve housing. The size of the aperture 38 or of the aperture 39 that is formed in the disc valve, may best be determined by experiment. The aperture should be large enough-to permit the withdrawal of a suflicient quantity of sirup from the delivery spout upon tne return stroke of the plunger to prevent dripping of sirup J:

from the pump. The aperture should, how ever, be small enough to prevent the cornplete draining of the delivery tube for the least viscous liquids that are to be used in the pump. It will be understood, however, that if the pump is primarily intended for use with milk or otherliquids of low vi cosity, the aperture is preferably reduced to the size best adapted for the particular liquid. The range of use of the pump is, however, relatively large and, for commercial sizes of pumps for use at soda foun tains, a standard size of by-pass will be found to function satisfactorily for all liquids normally dispensed at such fountains.

A11 additional feature of particular importance is the form of the substantially,

dripless delivery spout that is shown in the drawings and that is particularly illustrated indetail in Fig. 7, Fig. 8, and Fig. 9. The

ery aperture 40 that is arranged substantially at one end of thelongitudinal-passage 41 and that communicates directly therewith. The passageway 41 has a side wall 42 that is relatively broad and flat and that is arranged to provide a pair of drain ledges 43 that are arranged at each side of the opening through the spout. By providing ledges in the manner indicated and by particular feature of the spout is the delivmaking the side wall of the delivery aperture relatively thin, the stream of sirup that is forced through the delivery spout engages the curved end portion of the passage 41 and I is discharged substantially at right angles to the general direction of the delivery spout.

from the delivery aperture to thereby pre vent dripping of sirup from the end of the spout. In fact, the innermost side wall of the aperture is seldom dampened by sirup, whereas the outer side wall of the aperture 40 directs the sirup through the delivery spout. As the sirup is drawn back clined toward'the delivery aperture as indicated in Fig. 1. e 1

The base of the discharge spout has an aperture it for the convenient removal of the core used in casting the spout. A lug 45 is formed on the base of the spout to engage a suitable slot in the cover plate to properly align the spout when it is mounted on the cover plate'll. The aperture 14 of the spout base is usually filled with solder when the spout is mounted on the cover plate.

The operation of the pump may best be explained by referringparticularly to Fig. 1. If it is assumed that the pump cylinder is filled with sirup, the down stroke of the knob 27 and plunger forces the sirup from the cylinder 20 through the valve 19, the delivery tube 16, and out of the dispensing spout 18. The formof'the dis pensing spout or the delivery spout l8 such that the liquid is ejected therefrom in a uniform stream that is substantially free from spurts and the first splattering rush of sirup that is generally found inpumps of this character. The curved outer end of the spout combined with the operation of the by-pass in the delivery line provides a substantially solid jet of liquid that is apparently free from the preliminary splashes of liquid that is, characteristic of sirup pumps now in general use. I Upon release of the knob 27, the spring 30 returns the piston to its uppermost position as shown in Fig. 1 of the drawings. The

return stroke of the piston creates a suction within the cylinder 20 that lifts the valve 21 and draws the sirup from the bottom of the jar through the supply tube 22. The sucti on created by the return of the piston also closes the disc valve and draws a small amount of sirup through the by-pass aperture 38 or 39 into the pump cylinder. The quantity of sirup thus returned through the bypass is substantially the same for different The drain ledgeslii that flank the delivery aperture 40 tendto draw back sirup sirup levels inthe sirup jar 12 and therefore substantially the same quantity of sirup is dispensed by the pump at each stroke. The differential suction produced by thespring 30 is substantially constant. As previously mentioned, theregulation of the sleeve 31 :ontr ols thelength of piston stroke and thereby controls the v quantity of sirup dispensed by the pump.

It is believed that the partial draining of thedelivery spout through the by-pass upon the return stroke of-the piston and the effect of the by-pass relief on gradually building up the velocity head of the ejected liquid, tendsto absorb the preliminary splash of the liquid that is usually present in dispensing pumps of this character when not carefully operated. The end of the delivery spout 18" is so formed that when liquid emerges'from the spout, it strikes only the outer wallof the delivery aperture and apparently does not materially dampen the inner side wall of the aperture where dripping usually occurs. As the liquidis drained back into the delivery spout by the action of the by-pass that is formed either in the valve housing 19 or the disc valve 35, the surface tension of the return filow of liquid tends to draw back the liquid from the delivery aperture to thus prevent the-accumulation of drops of liquid at the delivery spout. In dispensing spouts that have heretofore been used with soda fountain equipment of this character, objectionable dripping from the end of the spout usually occurs. I

The bottom wall .2 of the delivery spout is made substantially flat adjacent the open end of the delivery spout, as is particularly shown in Fig. 9, in order to facilitate the drawing back of all of the liquid into the interior of the pump after each operation thereof. The pump is inclined at substantially the angle shown during its operation. The ledge that is formed on each side of the dispensing aperture 40 of the delivery spout has a thin film of liquid formed thereon that assists in drawing back the sirup from the delivery aperture 40 into the pump.

Furthermore, it is to be understood that the particular forms of apparatus shown and described are presented for purposes of explanation and illustration and that various other modifications of said apparatus can be made Without departing from our invention as defined in the appended claims.

What we claim is:

1. A liquid dispensing pump comprising a measuring cylinder,'adapted to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped,a piston operating within the cylinder, a valve mounted in an inlet port for said cylinder adapted to substantially prevent return flow of liquidfrom said cylinder, a discharge spout, a Connection" from the cylinder to the kill ll l

discharge spout having a valve therein adapted to substantially prevent return flow of liquid from the spout to, the cylinder, and

by-pass permanently connecting the discharge spout with the cylinder to withdraw a predetermined relatively small quantity of liquid from the discharge spout into the cylinder upon return strokeof the piston.

2. A sirup dispensing pump comprising a pump unit having a measuring chamber, a discharge spout, a valve interposed between said spout and said chamber adapted to restrict the return fiow of sirup from. the spout and to permit relatively free flow from the chamber to the spout, and a permanently open aperture of relatively small size connecting the cylinder with the discharge spout. V

3. A sirup pump comprising a cover plate, a pump unit supported solely therefrom having a body portion provided with a measur ing chamber, a piston operating in the measuring chamber, an intake valve in the bottom of said chamber adapted to permit the flow of sirup into said chamber and to prevent the return flow of sirup therethrough, a discharge spout connected with said chamher, a valve interposed between said measuring chamber and said discharge spout adapted to prevent a substantial return flow of sirup therethrough, and an aperture formed in said valve adapted to permanently connect the measuring chamber with the delivery spout. I

4. A pump unit comprising a cylinder formed of die cast metal, an open ended valve housing formed integrally therewith, a hollow plug adapted to close the open end of said housing and providing a valve seat on the upper open end thereof, a disc valve supported by said plug, an aperture through said plug adapted to permanently connect the open end of the plug with said cylinder, and a permanently open aperture by-passing said disc valve.

5. A sirup dispensing pump comprising a pump having a measuring chamber, a discharge spout, a discharge aperture formed in the side wall of said spout adjacent its outer end and being free from drip flanges, a valve interposed between said spout and said chamber adapted to restrict the return flow of sirup from the spout to the chamber and to permit a relatively free flow of sirup from the. chamber to the-spout, and a permanently open aperture of relatively small size formed adjacent the seat for said valve. 7

6. The combination with a periodically operating liquid dispensing pump of an inclined delivery spout having a longitudinally extending passageway that communicates at its outer end with a delivery aperture formed in the side wall of the spout,

' the walls of the delivery aperture being relatively thin and substantially free from a drip ledge, the delivery aperture being of materially lesswidth than the width ofthe longitudinal passageway connecting there-.

of the spout.

8. The combination with a sirup dispensing pump, of a delivery spout having an aperture extending. longitudinally thereof and terminating in a laterall opening aperture that is formed in the side wall of the spout, the wall of the passageway in which the aperture is formed being relatively flat adjacent the delivery aperture and being sufficiently Wider than the deliveryaperture to provide a return ledge on each side of the delivery aperture for drawing back sirup into the delivery spout, and a permanently open passageway between the pump and the spout that serves 'sn ness than the thickness of the adj acent walls to withdraw sirup from said spout after 7 each delivery stroke of said pump.

9. A sirup dispensing pump comprising a pump unit having a measuring chamber, W

a delivery spout, a valve interposed between the measuring chamber and the delivery spout that is adapted to restrict the return flow of liquid from the delivery spout to the measuring chamber, a permanently open aperture of relatively small size connecting the pump chamber with the. delivery spout, said delivery spout having a longitudinal passageway that communicates directly with a lateral discharge opening of less lateralwidth.

10. A sirup dispensing pump comprising a pump unit having a measuring chamber,

a piston, a delivery spout, a valve interposed between the measuring chamber and the delivery spout that is adapted to restrict the return flow of liquid from the delivery spout to the measuring chamber, a permanently open aperture .of relatively small size connecting the measuring chamber with the delivery spout adapted, to suck back sirup from said spout after each dispensing stroke.

11. A sirup pump comprising a pump unit having a measuring chamber and a piston operating therein, an intake valve in the bottom of said chamber adapted to permit the flow of sirup into said chamber and preventing the return flow of sirup therefrom, a discharge spout and a passageway lfll) connecting said chamber with said discharge spout, a valve in said passageway adapted to restrict the return flow of fluid from the discharge spout to the, chamber, a permanently open passageway by-passing said valve that is interposed between the chamber and the discharge spout adapted to withdraw a predetermined quantity of sirup from said discharge spout after each delivery of sirup therefrom, said discharge spout having a longitudinal passageway therethrough that communicates with a laterally opening discharge passageway formed in the side wall of said delivery spout and being substantially free from drip flanges, the laterally open passageway being of somewhat less lateral width than the lateral width of said longitudinal passageway at the pointof connection therebetween to provide a drain ledge on each side of said delivery aperture that is adapted to withdraw sirup from the side walls of said delivery aperture when the sirup is drawn back into the longitudinal passageway of the discharge spout, said delivery spout being inclined less than 45 when in operating position.

12. A sirup dispensing pump comprising a pump unit having a measuring chamber, a piston, a delivery spout, a valve interposed between the measuring chamber and the delivery spout that is adapted to restrict the return flow of liquid from the delivery spout to the measuring chamber, a permanently open aperture of relatively small size connecting the measuring chamber with the delivery spout adapted to suck back sirup from said spout after each dispensing stroke, said delivery spout being inclined slightly and having a passageway extending longitudinally thereof that has a flattened inner wall at the outer end thereof and a delivery aperture formed in said flattened wall of less width than said flattened wall and having no drip flange formed thereon.

In testimony whereof we aflix our signatures.

CHARLES T. J OSLIN. CARL W. KLOTZ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2593607 *Oct 28, 1946Apr 22, 1952Weber Showcase & Fixture Co InJar pump having antidrip spout
US2709538 *Apr 7, 1951May 31, 1955Armour & CoFilling machine
US2960038 *Apr 18, 1955Nov 15, 1960Phillips Petroleum CoBellows pump
US3191807 *Nov 13, 1961Jun 29, 1965Microchemical Specialties CoDispenser adapted for ultra-micro range
US5305917 *Nov 19, 1992Apr 26, 1994Fluid Management Limited PartnershipSimultaneous dispensing apparatus
US5310257 *Oct 29, 1992May 10, 1994Fluid Management Limited PartnershipMixing apparatus
US5407100 *Jan 7, 1994Apr 18, 1995Fluid Management Limited PartnershipDispensing apparatus with a moveable plate
US5591012 *Jul 7, 1994Jan 7, 1997J. Wagner GmbhConveying pump for supply containers of various heights
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/109, 222/309, 222/571, 222/382
International ClassificationB67D1/00, B67D1/02
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/02
European ClassificationB67D1/02