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Publication numberUS1644940 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 11, 1927
Filing dateSep 21, 1926
Priority dateSep 21, 1926
Publication numberUS 1644940 A, US 1644940A, US-A-1644940, US1644940 A, US1644940A
InventorsMoyer Fredellia H
Original AssigneeMoyer Fredellia H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of joining serrated steel structural units
US 1644940 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v I 1 1,644,940 Oct. 11,1927. RHMOYER METHOD OF JOINING SERRATED STEEL STRUCTURAL UNITS Filed Sept. 21. 1926 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 \J Zlwuanlma l [YEA/01a 6H0: "up

0a. 11,1927. F H MOYER ,9

METHOD OF JOINING SERRATED STEEL STRUCTURAL UNITS i 15. Mqye K attomeqa/ II I!" III! 1,644,940 Oct- 119 F H F JOINING SERRATED STEEL STRUCTURAL UNITS Filed Sept. 21. 1926 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 III II 1! WM MW F. H. MOYER Oct. 11,1927.

METHOD OF JOINING SERRATE D STEEL STRUCTURAL UNITS Filed Sept. 21. 1926 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented Oct. 11, 1927.

UNITED STATES FREDELLIA H. MOYER, on CANTON, OHIO.

METHOD OF JOINING SERRATED STEEL STRUCTURAL UNITS.

Application filed September 21, 1926. Serial No. 136,812.

The invention relates to structural members such as beams, joists, columns, struts, purlins and the like, and more particularly to such structural members in which the web portion contains considerably less material than the ordinary rolled sections now in common Se.

The object of the improvement is to provide rolled steel sections such as I-beams, channels, angles, T-bars or rolled steel plates and the like, with perforated or open work webs containing less material and of greater depth and strength than .in the usual rolled sections.

Commercial hot rolled I-bea-ms, channels and similar structural shapes such as are used in standard building construction, include web members of solid material integrally formed with the flanges throughout the entire length of the beam, channel, or other sections; this being necessarily due to the fact that these structural members are rolled from a single piece of steel by a method of rolling wherein it is impossible to produce the section as a single piece without the solid integral web portion.

In built up sections such as plate steel girders and the like, the web member is also of solid plate material extending throughout the entire length of the girder.

In all such solid web units there is a considerable excess of material in the web portions, over that actually required for transmitting stresses from flange to flange, and this invention contemplates the reduction of this excess weight as far as possible, by cutting the web portion of the beam or other structural member into two parts longitudinally, the out being started at a point on or between the median line of the web and one flange and following a path away from and returning to the line of the startin point, continuing regularly back and forth t roughout the entire length of the web, cutting the beam into two substantially matched serrated halves.

These serrated halves of the beam or other sections are then placed together with the high points of the serrations of each half abutting the high points of the other half, the abutting portions of the web being attached together-as by welding, forming a beam or the like of greater .depth than the rolled section from which it is formed, and having considerably less material in the web portion,

An embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings forming part hereof, in which Figure 1 is a side elevation of an eight inch I-beam in which the cutting lines are shown toproduce the serrated sections for re-assembling to produce a twelve inch. beam;

Flg. 2, is a similar view of the twelve inch beam formed from the sections cut as shown one half of each of the beams shown' in'Figs/ 5 and 6;

Fig. 9 is a perspective view of a beam constructed in accordance with the invention, showing vertical web stifi'eners in the form of angle irons or the like;

Fig-10 is a perspectiveview of a beam showing a modification of the serrations;

,Fig. 11 is a perspective view showing an application of the invention to the web of a bu lt up plate steel girder, the fiat web plate being serrated and re-assembled to form a g1rder of greater depth and strength than would be obtained using the same width web plate not serrated and re-assembled;

Fig 12, is a side elevation showing the application of the invention to a structural member with latticed or reticulated web;

gig. 13 is a transverse section of the same, an

Fig. 14' is a perspective view of the beam shown in Fig. 2.

Similar numerals refer to corresponding parts throughout the drawings.

In Fig. 1 is shown an I-beam having the flanges 1 and web 2. For the sake of illustration it is assumed that this is an eight inch beam. In carrying out the invention the web 1s out upon a line indicated at 3, starting at one end of the web, at one side of the median line thereof, as indicated at 4.

The point 4 may be substantially six inches from the lower flange, and the cut extends back and forth across the median line of the web, preferably having the angular portions 5 and strai ht portions 6, parallel with the flan es of t e beam.

T -'e beam is thus divided into two halves,

each havin one flange and a serrated web. The upper v alf may then be divided, by the transverse central cut 7 into two similar portions indicated at A and B, while the lower half is indicated at C.

The portions A and B of the upper half are then removed and placed in reverse position, upon the lower section G, as shown in Fig. 2, the high points of the serrations of each half abutting the high points of the other section, as shown at 8, forming intervening open spaces 9, while the two outer ends of the sections A and B meet at the transverse center of the beam as shown at 10.

The points 8 and 10 are then connected together as by welding, producing a twelve inch beam having the same amount of material which was originally in the rolled eight inch beam, but with greatly increased strength.

In Figs. 3 and 4 is shown a beam formed ,in the same manner as in Figs. 1 and 2, ex'- cepting that the transverse cut is not made to'divide the upper half into two sections. The beam shown in Fig. 3 is cut in the same manner as in Fig. 1, upon the line 3, forming the upper section D and lower section E. The upper sect-ion is then removed and placed upon the lower section, being moved one-half of a space to the left, as shown in Fig. 4, the abutting pointsof the two sections being welded together as above described, and the projecting end portions indicated in dotted lines at 11 and 12, being then cut from the upper and lower sections.

respectively. This forms substantially the same beam as in Fig. 2 but requires the wasting of the material in the cut off ends 11 and 12. V

As shown in Figs. 5 and 6, two similar I-beams may be reversely serrated upon the lines 3 and 3 respectively, forming thetop and bottom sections F and G from the beam in Fig. 5, and the top and bottom sections H and I from the beam shown in Fig. 6.

The bottom section G and top section H may then be matched to produce a beam with closed ends, as shown in Fig. 7, and the bottom section I and top section F may be similarly matched to produce a beam with open ends, as shown in Fig. 8.

If it is desired to provide closed ends upon the beam such as shown in Fig; 8, angle iron braces or the like, such as are shown in Fig. 9, may be welded to the ends of this beam, although for somepurposes this may not be necessary.

Fig. 9 shows a beam whichmay be made in any of the manners above described, in which vertical web stifi'eners such as the angle irons 13, may be welded across the beam at intervals, such web stiffeners being particularly desirable where the webis of considerable depth in comparison with the flange width.

girder, in which the flat web plate 15 is serrated as above described, and the sections then re-assembled in the manner outlined above as a part of the complete unit.

Figs. 12 and 13 show the invention applied to a lattice or reticulated web girder, in which the top and bottom chords 16 and 17 respectively are parts of an I-beam ser rated as above described, the serrations 18 thereof being utilized as receiving parts to which the lacing members, in the form of angle irons 19,"are attached.

It is obvious from the above that by serrating the web of a beam or the like and abutting the serrations or high points of the sections thus formed, or separating them, the depth of the original beam is increased, providing corresponding open spaces between abutting or opposite points of the web member: The increasing of the depth of the beam is also accompanied by a marked decrease in the amount of material in the combined web member,,with a'corresponding decrease in its weight relative to the depth of the beam.

This method of web serration may be applied to the various standard structural rolled sections such as I-beams', channels and the like, including former solid web steel girderswherein the solid web member may be divided into two serrated portions and assembled as an open web girder in the same manner that the beam sections are assembled. I

' I claim:

1. The method of forming beams and the like, which consists in separating the solid web portion of a beam by a serrated cut, cutting one of the sections thus produced transversely into two parts, reversing the position of said parts, and matching the sec tions together to produce a beam of greater depth.

2. The method of-forming beams and the like, which consists in separating the web portion of a beam by a serrated cut; cutting one of the sections thus produced transversely into two parts, connecting the outer ends of said parts together and matching the sections to produce a beam of greater depth.

\ 3. The method of forming beams and the like which consists in separating the solid web port-ion of the beam by a serrated cut, cutting one of the sections thus produced transversely into two parts, reversing the position of said parts and matching the sections together to produce a beam of greater depth and connecting Vertical Web stilfeners across the beam at intervals.

'l. The method of forming beams and the like, which consists in separating, the Web portion of a beam bv a serrated cut, cutting one of the sections thus produced transversely into two parts, connecting the outer ends of said parts together and matching the sections to produce a beam of greater depth, and connecting vertical web stitl eners across the beam at intervals.

5. A beam or the like formed by cutting the web of a beam or the like upon a line which alternately crosses the median line thereof. cutting one of the sections thus produced transversely into tWo parts, and rerersing the position of said parts, the serrations of the web portions being abutted and connected together.

In testimony that I claim the above, I have hereunto subscribed my name.

FREDELLIA H. MOYER

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2678488 *Mar 22, 1951May 18, 1954Gen ElectricMethod of making structural members
US2697453 *Sep 9, 1950Dec 21, 1954Paolo FormentiProfile metal element made of a number of welded component parts, for frames of heddle shafts
US2762472 *Feb 8, 1952Sep 11, 1956Pittsburgh Des Moines CompanyHollow sheet metal panels and method of making the sections from which such panels are made
US2773304 *May 5, 1953Dec 11, 1956Twin Coach CoMethod for the production of vehicles
US2943367 *Dec 2, 1955Jul 5, 1960Univ IllinoisCeiling structure
US2990038 *May 29, 1959Jun 27, 1961Harry DiamondStructural beams
US3050831 *Mar 28, 1960Aug 28, 1962Harry DiamondMethods of making structural beams
US3066394 *Jan 30, 1959Dec 4, 1962Franz LitzkaApparatus for the manufacture of deeply-webbed girders
US3224156 *Mar 19, 1963Dec 21, 1965Jacques MarchandStructure of tubular framework for carrying surfaces working in the cold or hot
US3263387 *Aug 9, 1965Aug 2, 1966Simpson William MFabricated non-symmetrical beam
US3283464 *Oct 19, 1964Nov 8, 1966Franz LitzkaHoneycomb girders and method for making same
US3365852 *Jun 20, 1966Jan 30, 1968Ronald J. PitilloStructural framing members
US3874051 *Jan 25, 1974Apr 1, 1975Malik StanislausMethod for producing girders
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US5661881 *Jan 30, 1996Sep 2, 1997National Gypsum CompanyMethod of making framing components of expanded metal
US5875905 *Jun 11, 1997Mar 2, 1999United Fixtures CompanyTapered cantilevered support arm for storage rack systems
US6012256 *Sep 6, 1997Jan 11, 2000Programmatic Structures Inc.Moment-resistant structure, sustainer and method of resisting episodic loads
US7610724 *Jun 23, 2004Nov 3, 2009Rubbermaid IncorporatedShed roof truss adapted for storing long handle tools
US8028493 *May 19, 2006Oct 4, 2011Asd Westok LimitedFloor construction method and system
WO1999013177A1 *Feb 3, 1998Mar 18, 1999Mark Amos AschheimMoment-resistant structure, sustainer, and method of construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/897.31, 29/897.35, 52/634, 29/425
International ClassificationE04C3/04, E04C3/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04C3/086, E04C2003/0491, E04C2003/0413, E04C2003/0452, E04C2003/0434
European ClassificationE04C3/08B1