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Publication numberUS1647289 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 1, 1927
Filing dateApr 7, 1926
Priority dateApr 7, 1926
Publication numberUS 1647289 A, US 1647289A, US-A-1647289, US1647289 A, US1647289A
InventorsGeorge W Gwinn
Original AssigneeAmerican Mach & Foundry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of wrapping pies
US 1647289 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 1, 1927. 1,647,289

G. W. GWINN METHOD OF WRAPPING PIES Filed April 7. 1926 i If INYENTOR ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 1, 1927.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

GEORGE w. GWDIN, OF HEWLETT, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO AMERICAN MACHINE 6t FOUNDRY, COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

METHOD OF WRAPPING PIES.

Application filed April 7, 1926. Serial No. 100,388.

This invention relates to a method of wrapping a pie, or other substantially flat and circular article, either of uniform or of irregular thickness, or xmi-fluid substances contained in a dish that must not be tumbled about or subjected to shocks or pressure, the main object of the invention being to wrap the article or substance and seal the package with the least possible disturbance in of the article or substance, in order to produce a package of neat appearance without damage to the article or substance wrapped.

The method consists substantially in placing the article between two substantially circular discs of wrapping material projecting beyond the article, then sealing the projecting edges of the discs together. In case of bakery products, which are usually placed on a paper plate, the latter, especially shaped for the purpose if necessary, may be used as the lower disc, thereby simplifying the method.

In the accompanying drawings, Figs. 1, 2 and 3 illustrate the successive steps in enveloping a pie contained in a dish or on a plate in two separate Wrapping discs; and Figs. 4, 5 and 6 illustrate two modifications of the method wherein the pie plate is used as the lower disc.

Referring to Figs. 1 to 3, a pie 7, resting on a plate 8, together with two substantially circular discs 9 and 10 of paper, one below and one above the pie, are placed on a support 11, around which are placed vertically movable cylindrical formers 12 and 13, the lower former 12 being smaller than the upper former 13, so that the smaller may be pushed into the larger, or the larger pushed over the smaller, with suflicient distance between their opposing surfaces to allow the edges of the discs 9 and 10 to enter the space between them.

The lower former 12 is first raised, or the support 11 lowered, a sufficient distance to bring the upper edge of said former on a level with, or above, the highest point of the pie to be wrapped, the lower disc 9 thereby being bent upwardly to assume the shape shown in Fig. 2, and meet the upper disc.

50 In order to allow for the up-bending of the lower disc, itis made of a larger diameter than the upper disc, so that the edges of the two discs will be of approximately the same diameter where brought together in the position shown in F 3.

Next, the upper former is lowered, or the support 11 and lower former 12 are raised, until the two formers overlap as shown in Fig. 3, thereby pressing the two discs together to form a cylindrical joint 14, along which the sealing of the package is effected.

For convenience in handling thefinished package, the lower disc is preferably made of heavier wrapplng material than the upper (1180. Thick waxed paper may be used for the lower disc, and thin glassine or cellophane paper, both of which are desirable on account of their transparency, for the upper (llSC. If waxed paper is used for either disc, the seal may be effected by simply heating the oint 14 by means of a heating coil or other heating means surrounding the upper former l3. Otherwise, the joint may be sealed by applying paste to the edge of one of the discs before it is pressed between the formers 12 and 13, or, the formers may be provided with grooves and corresponding ridges so that the joint will be automatically sealed by crimping the two discs together without wax or paste.

The edge of one or both discs may be scalloped or otherwise trimmed in order to give the finished package a more pleasing or artistic appearance.

A modification of the method is shown in Figs. 4 and 5. Here, the paper plate 8, on which the pie 7 rests, is made with a cylindrical flange 15 as shown, so that the plate 8 will fit over the upper edge of the former 12. When forcing the formers 12 and 13 into overlapped position by moving one, or both, the edge of the upper disc 10 is folded down over the flange 15, making a joint similar to that shown at 14 in Fig. 3.

In Fig. 6, the paper plate 8 is made with a flat rim 16 which gives rise to still another modification of the method. In this case, the formers 12 and 13 are provided with horizontal flanges 17 and 18 respectively, and the process of sealing the pie is reduced to merely pressing the upper disc down on the plate rim 16 by forcing together the flanges 17 and 18 of the formers, after having previously applied paste to the plate rim edge, or to the edge of the upper disc, or, in case of waxed paper, in subsequently heating the joint.

What is claimed is:

1. The method of packaging articles, which consists in placing an article between two discs each of greater diameter than. the article, and bringin and bending and sealing together in cylindrical form the edges of said discs.

2. The method of packaging articles, which consists in forming a supporting disc and a covering disc each ofgreater diameter than the article, placing the article between said discs, and bringin and bending and sealing together in cy 'ndrical form the edges of said discs.

3. The method of packaging articles, which consists in forming a supporting disc and a covering disc each of eater diameter than the article, placing t e article between said discs, and bringing and bending and sealing together in cylindrical form the edges of said discs,'said supporting disc being dished to a depth as great as the'depth of the article.

4. The method of packaging articles, which consists in forming a supporting disc and a covering disc each of greater diameter than the article, lacing the article between said discs, and ringing and bending and sealing together in cylindrical form the edges of said discs, said supporting disc being formed thicker and more rigid than said covering disc. 1

5. The method of packaging articles,

which consists in forming a supporting disc and a covering disc each of greater diameter than the article, placing the article between said discs, and bringing and bending and sealing together in cylindrical form the edges of said discs, said supporting disc carrying a substance which enables it to be sealed to said covering disc.

6. The method of packaging articles,

which consists in formin a supporting disc and a covering disc eac of greater diameter than the article, lacing the article between said discs, and ringing and bending and sealing together in cylindrical form the edges of said discs, oneof said discs carrying a substance whereby said discs are sealed together. 7. The method of packaging articles, which consists in forming a supporting disc and a covering disc each of greater diam eter than the article, lacin tween said discs, and ringing and bending and sealing together in cylindrical form the edges of said discs by passin the assembled article and discs throug cylindrical forming dies.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

GEORGE W. GWINN.

the. article he-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2490781 *Aug 22, 1946Dec 13, 1949William S CloudMethod and apparatus for preparing and utilizing sheet material for packaging purposes
US2527919 *Apr 20, 1948Oct 31, 1950Leon DrangleCheese and cracker package
US2529837 *Dec 10, 1947Nov 14, 1950Tammen And Denison IncDouble compartment nesting band package
US2609735 *Jul 18, 1947Sep 9, 1952Marathon CorpApparatus for sealing containers
US2613489 *Feb 8, 1950Oct 14, 1952Terry Payton APress sealing head for wrapping and sealing edibles
US2688430 *Mar 24, 1947Sep 7, 1954Brock LynmarFood platter
US2754959 *Feb 25, 1953Jul 17, 1956Roland W Miller SrDisplay package with transparent cover
US2899782 *Mar 1, 1954Aug 18, 1959 Method of manufacture of packing
US2912805 *Mar 29, 1955Nov 17, 1959Washington Steel Products IncMethod and apparatus for packaging merchandise
US2955400 *Sep 26, 1957Oct 11, 1960Levkoff Henry SOverwrapping of open-top cartons
US2971685 *May 3, 1957Feb 14, 1961Kingston Products CorpMolded carton for ragile articles
US2981039 *Jan 26, 1956Apr 25, 1961Pohl Ernest FTray package and method of packaging
US3030752 *May 18, 1959Apr 24, 1962Beltx CorpPackaging
US3355062 *Oct 10, 1962Nov 28, 1967Monsanto CoContainer closure seam
US3397773 *Dec 3, 1964Aug 20, 1968Grace W R & CoSpecial package
US5729962 *May 7, 1996Mar 24, 1998Agfa-Gevaert N.V.Method of lighttightly packaging a stack of light-sensitive sheets
DE1119753B *Feb 10, 1958Dec 14, 1961Sven Eric DahlenVerfahren und Vorrichtung zum Verpacken von Produkten in folienfoermiges Verpackungsmaterial
Classifications
U.S. Classification53/463, 53/464, 229/906, 206/583, 206/484
International ClassificationB65B11/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/906, B65B11/02
European ClassificationB65B11/02