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Publication numberUS1649104 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1927
Filing dateDec 9, 1920
Priority dateDec 9, 1920
Publication numberUS 1649104 A, US 1649104A, US-A-1649104, US1649104 A, US1649104A
InventorsGustav Egloff, Pollock Robert T
Original AssigneeUniversal Oil Prod Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of treating hydrocarbon oils
US 1649104 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 15, 1927.

c. EGLOFF ET AL PROCESS OF TREATING HYDROCARBON OILS Original Filed Dec. 9. 1920 stillcontent, and also in the latter case to GUSTAV EGLOFF, OF CHICAGO, mmors', AND ROBERT T. POLLOCK, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOBS TO UNIVERSAL OIL PRODUCTS COMPAIN Y, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS,

A CORPORATION OF SOUTH DAKOTA.

TROCE SS O1 TREATING HYDROCARBON OILS.

Application filed December 9, 1920, Serial No. 429,337. Renewed. February 5, 1927.

Our invention relates to a process of treating petroleum oil, consisting in distilling relatively heavy hydrocarbon oils of asphaltic base or under an emulsified condition by means of surface distillation in vacuum for the purpose of separating the hydrocarbon fractions therefrom with a minimum amount of decomposition so as to recover lubricating oil fractions therefrom as they occur in the oil naturally, and to cut to a minimum'the amount of sulphuric acid necessary in refining of lubricating oils for industrial uses.

Our process and apparatus covers the surface distillation of hydrocarbon oils by means of utilizing an electrically heated.

to prevent the direct firing from decomposition of the heavy hydrocarbon oils. It has also been found that when distilling heavy hydrocarbon oils under vacuum, such as emulsified oils or heavy asphaltic oils; in the ssible to apply heat to the bottom of the still and put a vacuum upon same without puking the former case it is practically impo prevent destructive distillation of heavy h drocarbon oils by means of direct fire upon the bottom of the still.

By our process we have found that we can vacuum distill the emulsified oils, or heavy hydrocarbon oils, such as asphaltic, by means of surface heating with an electrically heated resistance plate set upon the surface of the oil to be distilled, and that we can control the rate of distillation to a nicety with the minimum of decomposition practically obtainable.

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal cross section of our a paratus, Fig. 2 is a ores sectional view o the still, 1 representing a vacuum still supported upon concrete piers 2; 3'is.a manhole plate attached to the still 1, said still having pressure gauge 4. A raw oil charging pump 5 is connected to a storage tank (not shown) by means of ipe 6 having control valve 7 positioned t erein. The discharge side of pump .5, is connected to pipe 8, having control valve 9 positioned therein. 10 is an electric resistance material plate set in the body of the still, connected with fit tings 11 and wires 12, connected with electric generator 13. 14 is a vapor line connection to Water condenser coll 15 set within condenser box 16. A receiver for oil 17 is connected to water condenser coil 15. A pressure gauge 18 is positioned on top of receiver 17 and upon said receiver is attached a gauge glass 19. 20 is a draw-off pipe for liquid condensate, having control valve 2]. Valve 22 is a pressure control valve connected with vacuum 23, which is capable of drawing a vacuum as high as 28 inches.

Fig. 2 is a cross sectional view of the still 1, havingheating element plate 10 set therein. Still 1 is charged by means of raw oil pump 5 to level with the heating element 10, said level being maintained by the charging pump 5. When this liquid level in still 1 has been reached, vacuum pump 23 is started and the generator 13- is operated so that the electrical energy flow therefrom is converted into heat by means of resistance material 10 set within the still. The temperature of distillation is so maintained, and vacuum also maintained, that the rate of distillation is of that character that foaming or puking of the still content, where an emulsified oil is subjected to distillation, is impossible.

,We have found our process to act excellently with oils of a highly emulsified charac ter of a gravity not lighter than 20 degs. Baum, such as Casmalia crude, Panuco crude, and certain kinds of Santa Maria crudes. Our process gives a minimum of radiating losses and smoothly distills the oil with a high capacity er unit, with a minimum of destruction 0 the hydrocarbons, as the are in the hydrocarbon oil to be treated, an with a-minimum of further refining, such as sulphuric-acid treatment or caustic soda wash, or fullers earth, or bone black filtration.

We claim as our 1nvent1on:

1. A process of treating petroleum oil,-

consisting in distilling relatively heavy asphaltic and emulsified oils, of a gravity not lighter than 20 Baum, applying heat to subjecting the oil to a vacuum action in ex- 3. A process for treating petroleum oils, cess of ten inches. consisting in distilling the oils by applying 2. A process of treating petroleum oils, heat to the oil at the lipper surface of a body consisting in distilling relatively heavy asof the oil by means 0 an electrically heated 5 phaltic and emulsified oils, applying heat to element extending above the level of the the oil at the upper surface of the oil body body of the oil, and subjecting the oil to a by means of an electrically heated element vacuum action during the distillation. extending above the body of the oil, and subjecting the oil to a vacuum action during GUSTAV EGLOFF.

10 distillation. ROBERT T. POLLOCK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4623447 *Aug 2, 1985Nov 18, 1986Pennzoil CompanyBreaking middle phase emulsions
Classifications
U.S. Classification516/194, 196/114, 208/366, 196/121
International ClassificationC10G7/00
Cooperative ClassificationC10G7/00
European ClassificationC10G7/00