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Publication numberUS1649191 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 15, 1927
Filing dateMar 1, 1926
Priority dateMar 1, 1926
Publication numberUS 1649191 A, US 1649191A, US-A-1649191, US1649191 A, US1649191A
InventorsRogers Homer L
Original AssigneeCarey Philip Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
System of track installation
US 1649191 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 15, 1927.

H. L. ROGERS SYSTEM OF TRACK INSTALLATION Filed March 1, 1926 hatented Nov. 15, 1927.

imam ce.

Application filed March 1, 1926. Serial -70. 91,420.

lt ly invention relates to system of track installation in which the track is insulated so that the transmission of thevibration or movement of the track rail, due to passage of cars over it, to surrounding structures is minimized or prevented. I am able by my invention to install tracks using either wood, metal, concrete or other ties to which the rails are attached. I provide a suitable material, in contact with the rails of the track, which is of such a character that while sufficiently solid and rigid, to withstand shock or stresses due to trafficover the rail and to permit of being readily handled and transported, is likewise sufficiently plastic, elastic or flexible to absorb the shocks and vibration without transmitting them to the adjacent structure. In this way I not only preserve the surrounding structure against the strains due to vibration and shock from the trafiic but also provide means for permitting movement of the rail or the surrounding structure due to temperature changes without damage to the tracks or the structure adjacent thereto thereby greatly reducing the expense of repairs, and reducing noise. I preferably use in my track insulation an insulating material which in addition to the qualities stated is also of such acharacter that it me vents transmission of electricity from or to the rail is preferably also of such a charactor that it serves to water proof or moist proof the tracks or surrounding structure from water or moisture and of sufficient adhesiveness to adhere to the rail and prevent access of foreign matter to same.

In the drawings Figure 1 is a cross section of a rail showing my system of track installation. Figure 2 is a side View of Figure 1 and Figure 3 is a cross section of a modification of Figure 1 showing a slightly different type of rail. In the drawings in which like characters refer to like parts 2 and 3 are rail fillers and 4 is a rail pad or cushion which are all constructed preferably of a bituminous material such as asphalt containing an intimate mix forming a homogeneous mass of fibrous materials or solid materials or both to give it the required rigidity as stated. The tiller 2 has longitudinal grooves or recesses to assist in keying it to adjacent construction. The filler 3 is likewise provided with keys for the same purpose. These filters are preformed to conform to the contour of the portion of the rail into whi h they are placed and should preferably completely fill that portion so as to be in intimate contact with that portion of the rail. If desired the tiller portion that is to contact with the rail, or the rail, may be coated with asphalt or other bituminous material, or a material that will act as a solvent of the filler material may be applied to the surface of the tiller, so as to cause adhesion of the filler to the rail. The cushion l is preferably made in the form of a longitudinal channel, the sides l of which extend upward and over the base plate of the rail and are in intimate cont-act, and

preferably in adhesive contact, with the rail tillers 2 and 3. In this manner I am able to surround or envelop the rail on all sides exceptthe wheel surface thereof. These cushions 4 may be placed the full length of the rail as shown with the spikes or bolts, which hold the rails to the ties, passing through the cushion 4, or may if desired be placed below the rail only between the cross ties so that the rail rests on the cross ties and between the cross ties on the cushion. I prefer however to have the cushions below and in contact with the entire length of the rail as it enables me to get a more complete insulation. In Figure 3, I have shown a modification of rail filler being cored and a modified type of rail.

With the rails of the track installed as above described I have found that not only is the expense of maintenance greatly reduced but the noise of passing cars is muffied by the absorption of the vibration of the rails. The filler blocks have their surfaces which are adjacent to the surrounding construction, which may be concrete,

stone or wood blocks or any suitable construction, arranged preferably vertical, i. e., parallel to the rail web. When this adjacent construction is concrete I prefer to use the filler blocks provided with .the lrey way as shown.

Claims:

1. A system of track installation consisting of a rail, preformed blocks of vibration absorbing bituminous material conforming to the contour of portions of the rail so arranged as to surround the rail on three sides thereof.

2. A system of track installation consisting of a rail, preformed vibration absorbing bituminous material conforming to the contour of portions of the rail so arranged as to surround and intimately contact with the rail on three sides thereof.

3. A system of track installation consisting of a rail, preformed blocks of a bituminous material arranged on opposite sides of and in contact with said rail, a preformed cushion of bituminous material below the base of and in contact with the rail, said blocks and said cushion in contact with each other.

4. A system of track installation consisting of a rail. preformed blocks of a bituminous material arranged on opposite sides of and in contact with said rail. a preformed cushion of bituminous material below the base of and in contact with the rail. said blocks and said cushion in adhesive contact with each other.

5. A. system of track installation consisting of a rail, preformed blocks of a bituminous material arranged on opposite sides of and in contact with said rail, a preformed cushion of bituminous material below the base of and in contact with the rail, said blocks and said cushion in adhesive contact with each other all so arranged as to surround said rail except the wheel surface thereof.

6. A system of track installation consisting of a. rail blocks of a waterproof non-deteriorating vibration absorbing material, preformed to conform to the size and formation of portions of said rail and arranged in intimate adhesive contact with said portions. a cushion arranged below the base of said rail. said blocks and said cushion insulatin, said rail from the surrounding construction.

7. A system of track installation consisting of a rail. blocks of a waterproof non-dcterioratin; vibration absorbing material, preformed to conform to the size and formation of portions of said rail and arranged in intimate contact with said portions. :1 cushion arranged below the base of said rail, said blocks and said cushion in adhesive contact with each other and insulating said rail from the surrounding construction.

8. A system of track installation consisting of a rail, preformed blocks of bituminous material arranged on opposite sides of and in contact with said rail, a preformed cushion containing a bitun'iinous material provided with a portion adapted to lie below the base of the rail and a portion extending upward along the side of the base plate of the rail.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

HOMER L. ROGERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4461421 *Aug 2, 1982Jul 24, 1984The B. F. Goodrich CompanyRailroad crossing structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification238/9
International ClassificationE01C9/06, E01C9/00
Cooperative ClassificationE01C9/06, E01B19/003
European ClassificationE01B19/00A, E01C9/06