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Publication numberUS1651539 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 6, 1927
Filing dateJul 26, 1926
Priority dateJul 26, 1926
Publication numberUS 1651539 A, US 1651539A, US-A-1651539, US1651539 A, US1651539A
InventorsFletcher M Olson
Original AssigneeFletcher M Olson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insulating material
US 1651539 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 6, 1927. v 1,651,539

v F- M. OLSON INSULATING MATERIAL Filed July 26. 1926 Eek/561 M 0/5 11 wafif 12 w Patented Dec. 6,1927. v I 1,651,539

UNITED STATES PATENT err-"ice.

FLETCHER M. OLSON,OF BOBBINSDALE, MINNESOTA.

INSULATING MATERIAL. Application filed July 26, 1926. Seria1.No. 124,885.

My present invention has for its object but showing a slight modification of the 55 to provide an extremely simple and highly insulating material;

. cfiicient insulating material adapted for Fig.4: is an edge view of the insulating general use, but especially adapted as a submaterial shown inFig. 3, partly collapsed;

stitute for back plaster in dwellings or buildand ings. This insulating material is made up Fig. 5 is a fragmentary detail view show- 60 of a plurality of correlated sheets having ing one of the flaps of the insulating matesubstantially parallel and perpendicular rial shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 5. portions, the latter serving to space said For the purpose of howing the insulating parallel portions and form attaching flaps. material applied in position there is illus- Said sheets at the joints between their trated in the drawings one of the walls of a parallel and perpendicular portions are building which comprises studdings 6, sheetscored to afford folding lines. The several ing 7 and lath and plaster 8.

, sheets forming the insulating material are Referring first to the insulating material permanently connected at their flaps byglue, shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 5 the numerals 9 and stitches, or otherwise. The formation of 10 indicate respectively inner and outer the insulating material is such that it may sheets having substantially parallel portions be collapsed and folded in flat position when ,and perpendicular portions, the latter servcarried in stock and the sheetsthereof may ing to space said parallel portions and form be of ordinary paper, tarred felt of different attaching flaps 11. The perpendicular orgrades, saturated felt, asbestos, or the like. tions of the sheets 9 and 10 forming the aps The width of the parallel portions of the 11 are permanently connected by glue 12. insulatinghmaterial is such that itsnugly fits Said sheets 9 and 10 are scored at 13 so that between t estuddings of a building with its their perpendicular portions will readily flaps bearing against the opposing faces fold. 1

thereof and secured thereto by nails or lath It will be noted. that the perpendicular nailed to such studdings. The purpose of portions of the sheet 10 are wider than the scoring the sheets, forming the insulating perpendicular portions ofthe sheet 9 so as to material, at their 'oints 18 -to cause the laterally space the substantially parallel por- 30 parallel and perpendicular portions of said tions of the insulating material. The width sheets to assume their proper relation to of the perpendicular portions of the sheets 9 each other when the insulating. material is and 10 is such as to snugly fit between the unfolded. The perpendicular portions of studdings 6, and the flaps 11 bear on the one sheet are wider than the perpendicular opposing faces of said studdings and are 35 portions of the other sheet so as to hold the secured thereto by lath 14 secured to said parallel portions of the sheets laterally studdings by. nails 15. The substantially spaced when the insulating material is parallel portions of the sheets 9 and 10 are secured to and between the stu dings. These connected and laterally spaced at the intersheets of the insulating material are also mediate portions by a Z-shaped web 16 the 40 laterally spaced from the walls of the buildend portions of which are glued to the opposing and divide the space therebetween into ing faces of said sheets and said web is a plurality of air spaces. scored at 16' in its joints to cause said web The invention is illustrated in the accomto readily fold with the insulating material. anying drawings wherein like characters By reference to Fig. 2 it will be noted when 45 indicate like parts throughout the several the insulating material is collapsed one of views. the flaps 11 is folded directly on to the Referring to the drawings: parallel portions of sheets 9 and 10 and the Fig. 1 is a view in horizontal section showother flap 11 extends outward in the same i in one form of thefinsulating material plane with said sheets.

50 applied between walls of a building and Referring now to the modification shown secured to the studdings thereof; in Figs. 3 and 4, the construction of the in- Fig. 2 is an edge view of the insulating sulating material is the same as that shown material shown in Fig. 1, partly collapsed; in Figs. 1, 2 and 5 with the exception that Fig. 3 is a view corresponding to-Fig. 1, the attaching flaps 17 formed by the per-' a which the parallel and pendicular portions of the sheets 18 and 19 at the flaps 17 is indicated by the numeral 20, and the scored joints in said sheets are indicated by the numeral 21. placing this form of insulating material between the studdings of a building the inner flap 17 is first attached to the respective studding 6, the body of said insulating material is then moved studdings, and thereafter the other flap is attached to the respective studding. It is, of course, understood that the above described insulating material is placed in a building before the lath and the plaster is applied.

What I claim is:

1. An insulating material made up of a plurality of correlated sheets having substantially parallel and perpendicular portions forming a parallelogram, said perpendicular portions serving to space said parallel portions, said sheets having extensions aflording attaching flaps.

2. The structure defined in claim 1 in perpendicular porinto position between said tions of the sheets are flexibly connected-t0 permit saidmaterial to be collapsed and folded in fiat condition.

3. The structure defined in claim 1 in further combination withalongitudinal s acing web attached to the parallel portions of said sheets and connecting the same.

4. The structure defined in claim 1 in further combination with a longitudinal spacing web attached to the parallel portions of said sheets and connecting the same and to which the parallel and perpendicular portions of the sheets are flexibl connected to permit said material to be collapsed and folded in flat condition.

5. The structure defined in claim 1 in which said sheets are scored in the joints between their parallel and perpendicular portions.

6. The structure defined in claim 1 in which said sheets are permanently connected at their attaching flaps.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature.

FLETCHER M. OLSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2934465 *Sep 19, 1955Apr 26, 1960Flex O Glass IncInsulating material
US3165791 *Nov 15, 1960Jan 19, 1965Wood Conversion CoWall-forming structure
US4590727 *Aug 9, 1982May 27, 1986Foilpleat Insulation Company, Inc.Reflective insulation blanket with retaining clips
US5074090 *May 14, 1990Dec 24, 1991Lucas Curry Wall, Jr.Self-supportive reflective insulation
US5297369 *May 5, 1993Mar 29, 1994Dickinson Sydney LBuilding structure with improved soundproofing characteristics
US6491580 *Sep 28, 2001Dec 10, 2002Michael E. LemmonIndividual room duct and ventilation system for livestock production building
US7194846Jun 27, 2006Mar 27, 2007Hunter Douglas Inc.Method of manufacturing a compressible structural panel with reinforcing dividers
US7207151Jun 27, 2006Apr 24, 2007Hunter Douglas Inc.Structural panel with compressible dividers
US7303641Dec 3, 2002Dec 4, 2007Hunter Douglas Inc.Method for fabricating cellular structural panels
US7377084 *Dec 3, 2002May 27, 2008Hunter Douglas Inc.Compressible structural panel
US7398624Jun 27, 2006Jul 15, 2008Hunter Douglas Inc.Compressible structural panel with end clip
US8635974Dec 23, 2009Jan 28, 2014Whiteshire/Hamroc LlcIndividual room duct and ventilation system for livestock production building
US9179640Oct 18, 2013Nov 10, 2015Whiteshire/Hamroc LlcIndividual room duct and ventilation system for livestock production building
US20030154679 *Dec 3, 2002Aug 21, 2003Hunter Douglas Inc.Compressible structural panel
US20060254179 *Jun 27, 2006Nov 16, 2006Hunter Douglas Inc.Compressible structural panel with shadowing properties
US20060254205 *Jun 27, 2006Nov 16, 2006Hunter Douglas Inc.Compressible structural panel with closure clip
US20060260272 *Jun 27, 2006Nov 23, 2006Hunter Douglas Inc.Method of manufacturing a compressible structural panel with reinforcing dividers
US20070022672 *Jun 27, 2006Feb 1, 2007Bachynski Michael RHurricane protection harness
US20100011689 *Jul 15, 2009Jan 21, 2010Lippy William ASystem and method for providing a reflective insulation layer
US20110146582 *Dec 23, 2009Jun 23, 2011Lemmon Michael EIndividual room duct and ventilation system for livestock production building
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/406.3, 220/DIG.900, 428/121, 138/119, 138/116
International ClassificationE04B1/76
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/09, E04B1/7654
European ClassificationE04B1/76E