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Publication numberUS1660505 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1928
Filing dateFeb 21, 1927
Priority dateFeb 21, 1927
Publication numberUS 1660505 A, US 1660505A, US-A-1660505, US1660505 A, US1660505A
InventorsWilliam P Hacker
Original AssigneeWilliam P Hacker
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 1660505 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Febo 28, 192, y www5 W. P. HACKER I GAME y Filed Feb. 21. 1927 l0" \9 a 7 e 5 5 QQQ a @man yTALLY CARD lll Patented Feb. 28, 1928.

UNITED STATES Parr-:NTl oFFlCE.

WILLIAM P. HACKER, OF ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI.

Application led February 21, 1927. Serial No. 169,586.

My invention relates to games, and specifically to games in which the winner is determined by the throwing of dice.

Thel object of the game is to entertain both children and grown-up persons.

In the drawings,

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a field.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of a score card.

Fig. 3 is a plan view of a player-s identication card.

Fig. 4 is a view of a movable piece.

The game is designed to simulate a dog or horse race, or even a marathon race.

rlhe field 1 is designed to represent a race track, and consists of a sheet of card board ot suitable size, which in my preferred method is rectangular. On the upper face of the card board an oval outline is inscribed by the line 1, and an oval of similar shape is inscribed by the line 2, and is positioned in the geometrical center ofthe oval 1. A plurality of straight lines 3 are drawn parallel with each other and at right angles to the major axis of the field, and are spaced apart at equal distances.

The lines 3 are so disposed that their outer ends meet the boundaryline 1 and their inner ends, theboundary line 2, so that the lintervening spaces between the lines@ 3 are exactly opposite each other and the space enclosed between the lines 3 is approximately one-halt of the area of the eld, designated as a whole as 4.

The'opposite ends of the field are divided into a plurality of substantially equal spaces, separated -from each other by the radial lines 5 drawn from the boundary 1 to the boundary 2, and which would focus at a point within the -oval 6 if extended thereto. l

The spaces between the lines 3 and 5 are serially numbered from ,1 to any desired number, which I have shown in the instant case as 22.

The movable piece, which may represent a dog or horse, is 1n this case shown in Fig. 4, and consists of the outline of an animal 7 mounted on a flat base 8, which is sufficiently Abroad and at to cause the animal to stand erect when placed on the field. Each animal is both numbered and named, the name in this case being DuWaJack Ifor number 1. There are but six movable pieces for the reason which will later appear.

The tally card shown in plan view in Fig'. 2 is divided intoa number of squares by the vertical lines 9 and the horizontal lines 10. f

Longitudinally across the top ofthe card are placed a portion of the letters ort the alphabet, designated as 11, each letter being placed between two of the vertical lines, so that it designates all of the spaces beneath it.

The spaces between thefhorizontally disposed lines are numbered from 1 to 6, and also printed with the name of the movable piece having the same number. i

In Fig. 3 is `shown a plan view of a players card carrying the letter M The use of this card is to identify thel player .to whom it is given at the( beginning of the game.

rlhe paraphernalia necessary to play the game consists, in addition to t-he parts here shown, of a number of counters. which may be poker chips or any other suitable counter, andfthree conventional dice, each` numbered from 1 to 6.

with the paraphernalia aus provided, the

game is played as follows Any' number may pla the game at one time, uslng the -chips urnished with. the game as counters. Each player is given the same number of chips. The player who has the greatest number of chips at the end wlns first prize, the next highest number, second prize, etc. The player who first loses all of his chips, or the one who has the smallest number when the races' end gets the booby prize. The hostess should name the number of races to be run or set a time when play is tov stop.4

Each player is given one of the lettered cards which will identityl the player, and

the players chips are placed on the tally `card in the squares below players letters.

A player may place chips on one dog"v or as many dogs as he wishes. i Each player must play on at least one dog in each'race. i

After all players have placed their chips `on the tally card the race is started.. No'

player may place chips after a race is started.

The dogs' are started in space number 22.

The player on bankers left then ythrows the three dice 'and the dogs whose numbers appear on the dice are moved forward into space number 1. Should the dice show 1-3f6 dogs with those numbers are moved forwar one space. passed to the next player on the left who throws and the do s are again moved. The

The dice are then throwing of the' ice continues until three n 4 stacks.

Should the dice show the same number' on two or all three dice, dog with that number is to be'moved as many times as his number appears. The dog crossing the finish line first wins the race, the dog crossing the nish line second gets place and the dog crossing the finish line third gets show, The other three dogs are known as also ran. d

After first dog crosses the line, the throwing continues. Should his number appear again, that dice doesnot count, but the other dogs are moved. Same rule applies to second dog crossing the line. Should two dogs finish on the same throw, the one whose number first appears on subsequent throws finishes ahead of the other dog. Same rule applies should three dogs finish on same throw. Should two dogs be in space 2l and the number of one be thrown on one dice and the other on two dice, the latter finishes ahead of the one whose number appears on only one dice.

In starting play, one player is to be made banker to handle the tally card. The players will hand their chips to the banker who will place them in the squares opposite to the dogs they name, below the players letter. The banker will. return chips to the players after the race who have placed them on the winning dog, place dog and show dog.

First the banker will return all chips to players placed on the show dog. Then he will return chips to the players who have placed them on the place dog, giving eachl player three chips for each two he has put up. The extra chips to be taken from the stacks on the also ran dogs. Then the banker will distribute the balance of the chips left on also ran dogs on the stacks placed on the winning dog, placing one additional chip each time on each stack for each two chips, and continuing the distribution until all chips are added to t-he winning If the chips do not divide evenly, the banker will place the odd chips in the left over stack. Should it happen that no .one'has placed chips on the winning dog,

the banker will place all chips left on they tally card, after return has been made on place and show dogs, in the left over stack.

lVhenever the left over stack has accumulated enough chips to distribute one-or more to each pla er, the banker will return them,'giving eac player the same number, and leaving any odd chips in the stack for another return later in the game.

Having fully described my invention, what I claim as new and useful and desire to secure by Letters Patent is l. A game of the class described, comprising a field board bearing legends, game pieces bearin legends and ada ted to be moved over tige face of the .said eld board, the distance each game piece is to be moved being determined by thevcasting of dice, a tally card bearing legends corresponding with legends on the said game pieces and, also, bearin legends on p ayers cards, players identification cards bearing legends corresponding with the legends on said tally card.

2. A game of the class described, comprislegends corresponding with ing a field board legended to simulate a race track, said simulation consisting of a substantially oval field enclosing a much smaller oval field, the space included between said iields being divided by boundary lines into a vplurality of spaces, said spaces carrying a single number each of a series from one to a maximum, a movable game piece representing an animal mounted upon a flat base adapted to be moved from one of said numbered spaces to another numbered space as determined by the casting of dice, a tally sheet bearing legends corresponding with a legend on each players card and; also, bearing legends corresponding with a legend on each movable game piece, and players identification cards each bearin a legend corresponding with one of the legends on said tally sheet. l

3. A game of ythe class described, comprising a field board legend to simulate a race track, said simulation consisting of a substantially oval `field enclosingl a much smaller oval ield, the space included between ysaid ields being divided by boundary lines into a plurality of spaces, said spaces carrying a single number each of a series from one to a maximum, a movable game piece representing an animal mounted upon a flat base adapted to be moved from one of said numbered spaces to another numbered space as determined by the casting of dice, a tally sheet bearing legends corresponding with al legend on each players card and, also, bearing legends corresponding with a legend on each movable game piece, players identiiication cards each bearin a legend corresponding with one of the evends on said tally sheet, said tally sheet being divided into equal squares disposed in rows both vertically and horizontally, said hori' zontally disposed rows of squares being adapted to receive counters, and also being serially numbered from 1 to 6, saidl vertically disposed rows o squares being designated by the letters of the alphabet, the said horizontally disposed rows of squares, also, being designated by names corresponding with the names appearing on the sald movable game pieces of corresponding number.

In witness whereof I have hereunto affixed my signature this 17th day of February, 1927.

WILLIAM I. HACKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2823919 *May 12, 1950Feb 18, 1958Wilson L ScruggsRacing-game apparatus
US4060246 *Apr 25, 1977Nov 29, 1977Ward Leslie JHorse-race-simulating parlor or casino game of pure chance
US4917386 *Jun 22, 1989Apr 17, 1990Tozer W JamesApparatus and method of playing a board game simulating a race
US5106098 *Nov 19, 1990Apr 21, 1992Filiczkowski Mark AHorse racing game board apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/246
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00082, A63F3/00006
European ClassificationA63F3/00A10