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Publication numberUS1661750 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 6, 1928
Filing dateDec 8, 1924
Priority dateDec 8, 1924
Publication numberUS 1661750 A, US 1661750A, US-A-1661750, US1661750 A, US1661750A
InventorsDunbar Frank H
Original AssigneeDunbar Frank H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ash hopper
US 1661750 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

7 1,661,750 F. H. DUNBAR ASH HOPPER March 6, 1928.

Filed Dec. 8. 1924 2 Sheets -Sheet 1 rm. 1,

attozneg March 6, 1928; 1,661,750

I F. DUNBAR Y ASH HOPPER Filed Dec. 8. 1924 2 Sheets-SheeLZ Patented Mar. 6, 1928.

FRANK H. DUNBAR, OI CLEVELAND, OHIO.

ASE norrnn.

Application fled December 8, 1924. Serial No. 754,564.

This invention relates to hoppers, and more particularly to hoppers adapted for receiving and discharging hot ashes or the 5 An object of the invention is to provide such a hopper which will successfully resist the heat from the hot ashes or direct radiation from the combustion chamber of the furnace.

Another object of the invention is to provide structural wall elements whichcan be manufactured in standard units so that they may be arranged to build a hopper to fit the.

space available and give a maximum storm a 9 A further object of the invention is to provide wall elements which will also prevent leakage of quenching water that may be used to quench the ashes and thus keep 30 the hopper walls clean and dry.

Theseand other objects will be apparent from the following description and annexed drawings, in which Figure 1 is an end elevation of a hopper showing one of the side walls in section.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged vertical section of the side wall. r .Fig. 3 is a horizontal section taken on line 3-3, Fig. 1, showing the wall construction. 1

Fig. 4 is a plan viewof one of the metallic wall plates standing on edge.

Fig. 5 is an elevation looking at the inside of a plate i Fig. 6 is an end view of the wall plates.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged horizontal section forming the vertical locking strip for securing the ends of the wall plates together. Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a locking stri 9 is a vertical section on line 99, 1g. v

Referring to the accompanying drawings, the hopper is formed by a plurality of side walls 1 and a bottom 2 having one or more discharge openings. The hopper walls are supported by beams 3 and crossbeams 4, as shown in Fig. 1. In order to carry the walls 1 of the hopper, suitable flanged or angle sup rting bars 5 are secured at their up eiilen s tothe lbw 851d cross eams, an t eir op s' ower on .s carry one or more substa tia l l y horizontally diqrosed te frames 6 which surround and form the gischarge openings. Carried by the gate frame 6 is a gate 7, indicated in outline in Fig. 1, movable to open and close the hopper in any suitable manner. I Carried by the angle supportin bars 5 are wall-plates 8 which are preferably formed of cast iron and in unit sections of sufiicient length to 'cxtend between and overla the inner flat faces of the angle bars 5 whic are referably uniformly spaced about the iopper. In case the hopper is of such length as not, to be an even multiple of the length of a standard wall unit, or in ease V the hopper is formed with walls tapering inwardly or outwardl toward the hop r bottom, special wall plates ma be used I:- tween the supporting bars att e corners of the hopper and those forming the side walls adjacent thereto. A standard wall plate is shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6 and comprises a substantially rectangular plate'having flat outer sides 9 adjacent its ends and inturned flanges 10. The central ortion of the plate may be depressed inwar 1y at 11 in order to strengthen the plate and to form a substantially flat inner wall surface 12, as will be more clearly seen hereinafter.

The walls 13 forming the depressed panel .portion of the wall plates, together with. the

flanges 10, form inwardly opening channel portions 14. Co-operating with these channels are longitudinally extending clam ing bars 15 provided with'outwardly exten ing flanges 16. The flanges 16 are received in the channels 14 so that the outer faces 17 of the flanges .16 engage the inside faces of the sides 9 of the wall plates. Preferably, the flanges 16 are sufliciently long so that a clearance. is provided entirely around the flanges 10 of the wall lates, thus ensuring that the flanges 16 Wlll engage the wall plates; Also the channels 14 are sufliciently wide so that there is no engagement between the side walls of the channel 14 and the sides of the flanges 16, thus permitting the edges of the flanges 16 to tightly engage the faces, of the portions-9 of the wall plates when the clamping bars are drawn tightly up to the supporting bars and allowing lateral adjustment of the plates relative the bars.

In order to secure the clamping bars 15 to the angle bars 5 the clampln bars are preferably formed with outward y extendmg flanges 21 having inturned edges 22 providing a narrow slot or channel between them extending longitudinally of the clamptill ' low.

ing bar. Headed bolts 25 may have their heads inserted beneath the flanges 22, the body of the bolt projecting through the slot and through apertures at suitable intervals in the supporting bar 5. The threaded ends of such bolts are adapted to receive nuts 26 for clamping the bars 15 tightly in position against the supporting bars.

If desired, a sealing or packing strip 14'- may be located between the flanges 16 and the inside faces of the portions 9 to insure that there will be a liquid-tight joint therebetween. Such a strip, however, may be omitted and the spaces between the wall lates and the clampin bars may be made iquid-tight, if desiredfby filling the spaces between them with any suitable cement, such as a plastic cement, so that the inner faces of the wall plates, the clamping bars and the cement filling are substantially flush. If no packing be used between the clamping bar and the wall plates, the joint will soon become liquid-ti ht in case material, such as ash, containin liquid be stored in the hopper for the c ainping bar and wall plates will rust together along the flanges 16 of the clamping bar and seal the joint.

Preferably the upper edges 27 of the wall plates have their outer faces in substantially the same plane as the side edges so that they bear a ainst the'angle bars 5. At the lower edges t e wall plates are preferably cut away so that they will overlap the upwardly extending flanges 27 of the row of plates be- By tlns construotion it will be seen the upper and lower edges of the wall plates and the side edges'of the wall plates are shaped and interfitted to form substantially tight closures so that there will be no leakage of fluid from the contents of the hopper through the outer walls of the hopper.

The bars 15 are also preferably formed with interfitting rabbeted edges at the top and bottom so that an interlocking joint is procured for preventing leakage. The tongue member is shown at 28 in Figs. 8 and 9 and the rabbet is shown at 29. It is to be understood, however, that any suitable connection between the ends of the bars 15 may be used to make a tight joint.

On the inner faces of the wall plates, if desired, may be disposed inwardly extending flanges or ribs 33, 34, on which are supported a refractory lining, preferably com rising a series of lock tile such as shown in ig. 2. In this case the tile are recessed so that an overhanging lip 35 engages behind the upwardly and outwardly inclined flange 33 and opposing wall 36 of the tile forming the recessed portion is disposed underneath the outwardly extending rib 34. With this construction the tile is securely held on the wall plate so that it cannot be removed by a straight upward push but only by an upwar and outward swinging movement.

The lower edge of the tile is flared outwardly so that it overla s the tile disposed below with a downwar ly inclined draining joint. The inside surfaces of the tile are substantially flat to form a flat, inner wall and the joints between successive rows of the tile and between the abutting edges of the tile in each row may be cemented, if desired.

It is to be understood, however, that any suitable refractory lining may be used and that the inwardly extending flanges or books may be of any suitable shape to receive a lining, or may be omitted entirely in case no lining is desired. When omitted, it will be obvious that the inner faces of the hopper walls will be smooth, so that the material stored in the hopper may readily pass downwardly toward the discharge opening.

As shown in Fig. 3, the corner support ing bars 5 are preferably flanged bars having inner faces disposed substantially at angles to each other, to which are secured the ends of the corner wall sections by bolts 37 extending through the edges 38 of these sections. The corner may be made tight by filling the joints between the inner surfaces of the tile linin s at the corner with a suit- I able cement, suc as a plastic cement.

It will be seen that the standard wall plates with the inturned flan cs 10 can be used at the corners, if desire and a suitable corner clamping bar similar to the clamping bars in the side walls may be used to clamp the plates of the adjacent walls to the corner bar 5.

It will be understood that when it is necessary to use wall plates of other than a convenient standard or" unit length in one or more of the walls-of a hopper. the supporting bars 5 may be spaced apart a distance i more or less than the length of the standard wall plate, either at the corners or in a wall intermediate the corners of the hopper, that is, the wall sections may be standard adjacent the corner bars 5 at both ends of one 1 side of the hopper and wherever convenient in that wall of the hop er'the supporting bars may be closer or arther apart than standard length to receive one vertical row of spiral wall plates.

When the hopper is used for storing ashes or other material which may contain corrosive substances, it is preferable to make the wall plates and clamping bars of cast iron,

which, as is well known, is more resistant to corrosion than steel. With the tight 'oints formed between the wall plates an the clamping bars, the hopper walls are substantially liquid-tight and the supporting bars 5, as well as the bolts 25, which are outside of the wall plates, are rotected from the corrosive action of any su stances in the hopper.

Furthermore, it is to be understood that the particular forms of apparatus shown and having on their outer surfaces projections to receive means to secure them adjustably to said supporting bars and having their ends rabbeted so that adjacent clamping bars will cooperate with each other to form substantially liquid-tight joints.

2. The combination of wall plates havingrecessed side edges, upright supporting bars, clamping bars havin projections fitting into the recesses ofa jacent wall plates to form liquid-tight closures, said clamping bars having imperforate inner surfaces and havin on their outer surfaces projections exten ing for a major portion of the length of the-bars to receive means to secure them adjusta-bly to said supporting bars, and having their ends rabbeted so that adjacent clamping bars will cooperate with each other to form substantially liquid-tight joints.

3. A sectional metal wall for a hopper comprising spaced steel uprights, a plurality of imperforate, rectangular, cast iron wall plates supported against the inner side of the said uprights, a plurality of substantially rectangular cast iron yokes supported by the uprights and securin the said wall plates thereagainst, each ydlre having a lug. disposed on the exterior thereof, and detachable means connecting the lug to an upright, said detachable means being adjustable longitu-- dinally of said yoke to difierent securing positions.

4. A sectional metal wall includin in combination spaced uprights, wall having end edge dportions engaging tlila inner side of two a jacent uprights, each wall plate overlapping the next lower plate and ei-ng overlapped by the next higher plate and yokes each secured to an upright and overlap mg the said end edge portions of the wal plates to position the same against the uprig t, each of said yokes having a bolt head receiving channel formed on the outer s1de thereof and extending substantially the entire length thereof. a

5. A sectional metal wall includin in combination spaced uprights, wall p ates havin end edge portions engaging the inner s1de 0 two ad acent u rights, the outer face of said edge portions aving a substantially flat seatin face, each wall plate overlappin the next ower plate and being overlapp ates .by the next higher plate, and yokes each secured to an upright and overla ping the said end edge portions of the wall p ates and hav ing seating portions engaging the flat seating faces of said wall plates to position the wall plates against the upright, said seating portions of the yokes being of materially less lateral width than the flat seating faces of the wall plates to, permit adjustment of the wall plates relative to said yokes during assembly of thewall structure.

.6. A sectional metal wall includin in combination spaced uprights, wall p ates having end edge portions engaging the inner side of two adjacent uprights, the outer face of said edge portions having a substantially fiat seating face, each wallplate overlapping the next lower plate and being overlapped and by the next higher plate, and yokes each secured to an upright and overlapping the said end edge portions of the wall plates and having seating portions engaging the flat seating faces of said Wall plates topoeition the wall plates against the upright, said seating portions'of the yokes being ofmaterially less lateral width than the flat seating faces of the wallplates to permit adjustment of .the wall plates relative to said yokes during assembly of the wall structure, said yokes each having a bolt head receiving channel formed on the outer side thereof adapted to adjustably receive suitable clampbing bolts.

7 The com being flat to provide a fiat seating face, up-

right'supporting bars, clamping bars having flanges being of materially less lateral width than the lateral width of the cooperating recess, the space between the side wall of the recess and the flange bein adapted to receive a sealin cement, saidclamping bars having imperfo'rate'inner faces and having on their outer face projections adapted to receive means to secure them adjustably to said supporting bars.

8. A sectional metal wall including in combination a metal upright, two adjacent wall plates having end edge portions engaging the said upright, each of said edge ortions being provided with an upstan ing flange on the inner face thereof and a sub stantially flat seating surface extending from the base of said flange, the said" edge portions being spaced apart from each other on the upright, and a yoke having portions enga 'ng the seating surfaces of the plate ination of wall plates having recessed side edges, the bottom of the recesses right, the portion of said yoke engaging said seating surfaces being of materially less width than said seating surfaces in order that a material zone of adjustment during assembly may be provided between the wall plates and the yoke.

9. A sectional metal wall for a hopper comprisin a plurality of spaced metal uprights, a plurality of substantially rectan ular imperforate cast iron wall plates isposed within and supported by the said uprights, each wall plate having a liner supporting flange cast inte rally with and extendin at an acute ang e to the inner side thereof, and a plurahty of imperforate,

' yoke-like wall units engaging the inner surfaces of the said wall plates to press the same against the said uprights, the said units be- -ing secured to the uprights, the yoke enga ing ortion of the face of the wall unit bemg su stantially flat and materially wider than the wall plate en aging portion of the oke-like unit'to therby permit lateral adustment of said wall plates relative to said .means including a lug on each wall unit and a bolt cngaginv therewith and secured to an 11 right, the side edges of the adjacent wall p ates having flat seating faces of materially greater width than the cooperating seaiin faces of said imperforate wall units adapted to permit adjustment of said wall plates relative to said imperforate wall units during the assembly of the structure.

In testimony whereof, I hereunto affix my signature.

FRANK H. DUNBAR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3421278 *Feb 4, 1966Jan 14, 1969Victor Christ JanerStructurally augmented,faced,masonry barrier
US3909059 *Jan 16, 1974Sep 30, 1975Ti Brook IncFloor and frame construction for flat trailers
US4916875 *Jul 18, 1988Apr 17, 1990Abc Trading Co., Ltd.Tile-mount plate for use in wall assembly
US6289647 *Oct 28, 1998Sep 18, 2001Sjoelander OliverWall facing system
US8240098 *Sep 19, 2007Aug 14, 2012Faus Group, Inc.Molding profile and molding profile assembly
US8561369Apr 13, 2010Oct 22, 2013Faus Group, Inc.Molding profile and molding profile assembly
US20080010925 *Sep 19, 2007Jan 17, 2008Insa Jose F GMolding profile and molding profile assembly
US20100186332 *Apr 13, 2010Jul 29, 2010Gomez Insa Jose FranciscoMolding profile and molding profile assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/464, 52/510, 52/506.3
International ClassificationF23J1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF23J1/00
European ClassificationF23J1/00