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Publication numberUS1664261 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 27, 1928
Filing dateMar 28, 1927
Priority dateJul 31, 1926
Publication numberUS 1664261 A, US 1664261A, US-A-1664261, US1664261 A, US1664261A
InventorsGraham Squiers, William Mullins George
Original AssigneeGraham Squiers, William Mullins George
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Surface of roofs, walls, doors, panels, and other parts of buildings and structures
US 1664261 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. W. MULLINS ET AL SURFACE OF ROOFS, WALLS, DOORS, PANELS, AND OTHER PARTS OF BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES Filed March 28 1927 2 Sheets-$2199} 1 lNVE/VTOEJ GEORGE 146 mun/5 ae/7mm SQU/E/(if 2 M, 2 HTTOE/VEVS March 21, 1928.

G. W. MULLINS ET AL SURFACE OF ROOFS, WALLS, DOORS, PANELS, AND OTHER PARTS OF BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES Filed March 28 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 HTTU/PA/EVS Patented Mar. 27, 192s.

UNITED STATES I 1,664,261 PATENT OFFICE.

GEORGE WILLILAM MULLINS AND GRAHAM SQUIERS, OF IBIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND.

SURFACE OF ROOFS, WALLS, IDObRS,

PANELS, AND o'rrma rams or BUILDINGS AND srnucruans. v

Application filed March 28, 1927, Serial No. 178,919, and in Great Britain July 31, 1926.

The invention relates to roofs, walls, idoors, panels and like parts of buildings and structures, and provides for the weatherlproofing of their surfaces as will be hereinb'flafter described.

A weather-proof surface according to the invention'comprises a plurality of boards "fixed the one above the other horizontally so that the lower edge of each board forms a alongitudinal ridge, and a plurality of strips ;of thin metal such as copper laid horizontally the one above the other along and over a said boards to make weather-tight joint with each other at each ridge.

It is a part of the invention to have a Q double seamed joint of the longitudinal edges of the metal strips at or adjacent the ridge, and in making the joint to cover the nails whereby this joint is secured to the ridge.

The boards are what are known as feather-edge boards, and the lower and thicker edge of the one may abut against the upper and thin edge of the board below eitherwith' a butt joint, or with an overlapplng oint,

. or with a rabbeted joint, so long'as the ridge is provided to step the boards down the one below the other. The metal strips have their seamed joints made so as to fold and lie closely against .the thickest edge of the boards at the ridge formed by said thickest edge.

1 The 'oints of the strips of thin metal may be ma e in situ, or may be partly formed previous to the strips being applied to the boards.

The invention is illustrated by the accompanying sheets of drawings, and will be particularly described in connection therewith.

Fig. 1 is a perspective section on a large scale of a portion of a surface according to the invention.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view on a smaller scale than Fig. 1 showing the first stage of .6 laying a strip.

Fig. 3 is a similar view to Fig. 2 showing the second stage of laying said strip.

Fig. 4 isa similar view to Figs. 2 and 3 showing the third stage of layingsaid strip. Fig. 5 is a similar view to Fig. 4 showing the completed stage of laying said strip and the commencement of the laying of a: fresh stri T lie structure to be surfaced, for instance 55 a roof, is covered in by a number of boards applied so that the thicker lower edge a i a fixed the one above the other horizontally of the one board fits closely to the thin upper I edge a of the adjacentboard, providing between each two boards a step a formin a longitudinal ridge. These boards are w at are known as feather-edge boarding, the thin edge of the one fitting closely to the thick edge of the other, so that in the surface there is a succession of cross-sectionally tapering boards put together for providing a succession of longitudinal steps a forming ridges.

The boards a are now covered in by thin strip metal, preferably copper on account of lts extreme flexibility, a strip for each board, with seamed joints between the strips folded to 11s closely against or under the ridges.

Figs. 25 show a strip 0 applied to the lowest .board' in the elevated succession of boards, as the laying of the strips is commenced at the lowest board. This strip 0 extends for the full length of the boards, as does every strip, and may be nailed at its lower edge 0?. to the lowest board, and is then bent at its upper edge against the step of the board above to form a deep flange 0 The laying of the next strip d is now commenced, and firstly said strip is turned over and its one edge d is bent at right-angles into a short flange and applied to the step of the board above against the deep flange a of the strip 0, these two bendings being now nailed to the step, as indicated at e, which is the first step of laying the second strip d. The doc flange 0 is now bent downwardly over t e short flange d as represented at f in Fig. 5, after which the strip d is bodily lifted and bent upwardly about the two flanges 0", d, as represented by Figs. 3 and 4, so as to provide at the joint between the two strips 0 and d adouble seaming lying closely against the step a forming the rid e. The upper edge ofthis strip d is now ent against the "succeeding upper stepa with a deep flange d as represented by Fig. 4, after which a further strip g is applied to the flange d and step, and to the upper board, in exactly the same manner as described-with reference to the strip d in relationto the lowest stri c;- this succession 'of laying strips the one above the other being continued to the uppermost board of the surface the strip for which may be ultimately secured in a similar manner to the securing of the strip a to the lowest board.

The drawings clearly show by Fig. 1 the joint between the two strips as finished and nailed to a ste with the strip laid along and over the r1dge,.while Figs. 2-5 show the diflerent stages of applying the strips, the jointings being made in situ, but it will be obvious that parts of the joints may be formed before the strips are applied, as, for example, the short and deep flanges 0 d It will be seen from Figs. 1-5 that at the double seaming joint there are engaging hook formations providing four thicknesses of metal smashed down against a step in abutting relation thereto.

It is understood that there is a metal strip for each board, and that each board provides a ridge, and that the joint is at or adjacent the ridge, and that instead of the boards being close to each other vertically they may be a distance apart, as, for instance, where the roof is not boarded all over, so long as the series of steps and ridges already described are rovided, and so long as the overlapping e ges form the folded joints along the thicker edges of the boards.

The invention described for the surfacing of a roof is equally applicable to a. wall or to a door, or to a panel, or to any part of a building or surface whichis desired to be weather-proofed, and the invention is not to be limited to wood as boards, or to copper as the covering strip, as thin strips of brass,

bronze, lead, zinc or iron and steel may be used as the covering strip so long as the covering is rendered weather-proof and rust-' proof and is combined at the thick edges of the boards, namely at the-ridges, to provide close and eflicient joints.

Having now described our invention what we claim and Patent is desire to secure by Letters [1. In a weather-proof surface, the combi adjacent boar to form a longitudinal ridge.

extending at right angles to the plane of the structure to which the surface is applied; of a strip for each board'with the strip of one board bent at right angles to the plane of the strip to "form a flange which abuts against said ridge in a plane therewith, and the strip of a next adjacent board being also bent at right angles to the plane of the strip to form a second flange engaging the first named flange also in a plane with said ridge, the remainder of the second strip being bent to extend along the upper surface of said adjacent board.

2. In a weather-proof surface, the combination with a plurality of boards tapered in cross-section and fixed one above the other horizontally so that the wider edge of each board abuts against the narrow edge of an adjacent board to form a longitudinal ridgeextending at' right angles to the plane of the structure to which the surface is applied; of a. strip for each board with the strip of one board bent at right angles to the plane of the strip to form a deep flange which abuts against said ridge in a plane therewith and the strip of a next adjacent board being also bent at right angles tothe plane of the stri to form a relatively narrow flange engaglng the first named flange also in a plane with .said ridge with a portion of the first named flange extending beyondthe free edge of the second named flange and bent .over the same to provide a triple thickness of material along said rid the remainder of the second strip being ent to extend along the upper surface of said adjacent board.

In testimony whereof we have hereunto set our hands.

GEORGE WILLIAM MULLINS.

GRAHAM SQUIERS,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3157965 *Apr 24, 1961Nov 24, 1964Howe Sound CoStructural members
US6122878 *Apr 22, 1999Sep 26, 2000Pliley; RobertSeamless siding system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/528, 52/545, 52/530
International ClassificationE04D5/00, E04D3/367, E04D5/04, E04D3/36
Cooperative ClassificationE04D5/04, E04D3/364
European ClassificationE04D3/364, E04D5/04