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Publication numberUS1667273 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 24, 1928
Filing dateJun 22, 1926
Priority dateJun 22, 1926
Publication numberUS 1667273 A, US 1667273A, US-A-1667273, US1667273 A, US1667273A
InventorsEverette Stewart William
Original AssigneeEisele & Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Syringe shield
US 1667273 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 24, 1928.

w. E. STEWART SYRINGE SHIELD Fired June 22. 1926 INVENTOR Fatentecl Apr. 24, 1928.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE;

WILLIA EVERE'I'TE STEWART, F nnsnvInL 'r nn ss S I NOBTO EISEiE a coMrANY; OF NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE, .A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.

SYR-INGE SHIELD.

Application filed June 22,

needle may be placed in it prior to insertion of the syringe, so that the shield with the needle, and the syringe, may be separately sterilized, and the syringe thereafter inserted in theshield and operatively connected with the needle; to provide a shield which pro tects the syringe tip or part which enters the needle base and prevents breakage of the tip, this beingespecially important inthe case of a glass syringe; to apply the reactive force occasioned by pressure on the syringe plung er, through the shield to the needle base,

which insures retention of the needle upon the syringe tip, prevents displacement of the needle from the tip by hydraulic pressure, and especially in the case 01 a glass syringe tube, avoids application of strain to the bead at the: upper end of the tube; to provide a shield of flexible or adjustable construction sothat it is readilyand practically automatically adaptable to syringes of varying diameters, and to" provide a simple, secure and easily operated locking device for clamping the needle base in the shield and securing the shield to the syringe.

'The' characteristics and advantages of the invention are further suflicientl'y explained in connection with the following" detail description of the accompanying drawing. which shows a representative embodiment of the invention. Aft-er considering this example, skilled persons will understand that many variations maybe made, and I contemplate the'einple'yment of any structures that are pr oper lywithin the scope of the appended claims.

Fig; 1 is a perspeotiveview of a shield embodying the" invention in one form, properly applied and secured to'a glass syringe and a needle of the 'Luer type, as representative of knownor standardsyringes and needles with which theshieljd is designedto co-operate.

1926. Serial No. 117393.

Fig, 2 shows the shield,s'yringe and needle separated. I

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section ofthe lower part of the shield applied and secured to the syringe and needle.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of a known type of glass'syringe and needle, the syringe being provided with the usual finger grip, foruse'without ashielcl.

. While, as indicated above, the present shield is adapted or adaptable for use with various types of syringes and needles including metal or other syringes, and needles of other than the Luer type, the characteristics and advantages of the invention will be understood by explanation of its co-operation with a glass barrel syringe of known type and with Luer needles adapted for such glass syringes. The invention structure is therefore shown in the drawings as especial- 1y adapted to and used in connectionwitha syringe and needle of the stated types.-

This. glass syringe consists of a tube or barrel 1 having an integral tip 2 tapered and ground to have a tight friction fit witlr in the tapered socket 3 of the base 4 of a hypodermic needle 5, which, in this instance,

ton 6 slidesin the tube and the tube and piston are ground to provide a tight and practically leak-proof'fit. At the upper: end of the piston is a flattened" thun'ib knob 7. These glass tubes 1 usually have at the upper end a reenforcing bead 8, and" in customary practice a finger grip 10 having projecting finger pieces 11 is slipped over .the: tube and rests against the under face of the bead,'so that when the fingers o t'the operator are placed beneath the finger pieces ll, and the thumb is applied to knob 7 to force thepiston into the tube, the pressure reaction is taken; by the linger grip and applied to the bead '8; Since thetube 1 is usually of thin section, this pressure is apt. toica'use break age. The needlebase also, while it is applied to the't'ip 2 with a tight friction fit, isnot positively secured, and" hydraulic pressureiii To avoid these difficulties or disadvantages of the ordinary glass type syringe, and also to realize the objects or advantages above and hereafter pointed out in connection with syringes and needles of these and other types, .1 provide the shield structure generallydesignated as S, the drawing showing a single representative embodiment which is preferred in many cases, but which may evidently be varied as to details of structure or arrangement within the principles of the invention and within the limits defined by the claims appended.

This shield comprises a tubular body 20 at theupper end of which a "inger grip 21. is secured. The lower part of the tube is rendered adjustable or flexible by severing it alongv one, or preferably two, opposite longitudinal lines, as at Fig. 1, producin; the arate movable or adjustable lower portions 23 of generally semi-cylindrical contour. izrbore the longitudinal slots or divisions the tube is preferably cut away or apertured at one or preferably two opposite sides, as shown, this tube formation producing long, narrow part-cylindrical members 24; cormecting the upper tubular portion 20 and the lower adjustable members 23. The relatively narrow connecting members 24 are flexible or resilient and therefore support the lower gripping members for substantial movability toward and from each other. The lower gripping members 23 terminate in nose or chuck portions 26 of reduced diameter, and the inner face of each of the chuck members is grooved, as at 27, to receive the upper flange or bead 28 of a Luer or othertype of needle base 4. Any suitable clamping or locking device may be provided, represented in this embodiment by a ring 30 placed about the tube and prevented from down vard displacement by a pin 31 inserted in one of the clamping members 23. This pin also cooperates with a bayonet slot 32 in the ring, as explained hereafter.

The inner diameter of the upper portion of the tube 20 is dimensioned to tit syringe tubes within a desired range of sizes and it-will be evident from the following operative description, that the external diameter of the syringe used with any particular :ihield may vary within considerable limits.

The base of a Luer or other type of needle may be inserted between the chuck jaws 26 while they are separated (with the locking ring 30 in an upward position. as

in Fig. 2) and temporarily held in the shield by the natural resilient pressure of the connecting strips or by moving the ring 30 downward toward the pin 31. The shield with the needle may then be sterilized and a separately sterilized syringe may be inserted through the upper'end of the shield until. the tip 2 enters the needle socket 3 and is firmly secured by a twisting movement, and if necessary the lower flange 44) of the needle base may be grasped and turned to insure tight connection with the tip. position by moving the locking ring down until pin 31 enters the axial portion of the bayonet slot and then turning the ring to cause the pin to enter the diagonal or circumferential part of the slot to move the ring to final locking position, whereupon the inner faces of the clamping members 2 grip the lower portion of the syringe tube and the chuck members 26 grip the needle base. The looking or gripping action of the member- 23 and 26 in co-operation with the ring may be insured by so shaping the exterior faces of the members 23 that they flare slightly downwardly, this flare or taper being in most cases too slight foraccurate representation in the drawing.

If it is not desired to apply the needle to the shield before the syringe is inserted, the syringe may first be inserted in the shield while the gripping members 33 are laterally retracted; the needle is then applied and secured to the tip 2, and the ring 30 is moved to locking position whereupon the chuck members firmly engage the needle base, as previously described.

ll hen the finger grip 21 is grasped by the fingers and the thumb is applied to knob 7 to make an injection, the reactive force is applied through the shield to the needle base I and through it to tip 2 and the lower portion of the syringe tube. In this way the needle is firmly held upon the tip without possibility of displacement by hydraulic pressure, and any strainupon the upper portion of the tube or head 8 is avoided, and therefore there is no possibility of tube breakage caused by injection pressure. The side apertures in the shield permit ready inspection of the syringe and its contents. The shield covers the major portion of the tube and sufficiently prevents it from any reasonable possibility of breakage by contact with hard objects. Especially, the lower part of the shield or the chuck jaws 26 in co-operation with the needle base enclose the glass tip 2 and prevent breakage thereof. The range of movement or adjustability of the lower or clamping members 23 with-the chuck members 26 is such that the shield may be secured to glass or other syringe tubes of dillerent diameters within a substantial range. The locking device is easily manipulated even when the operator is using rubber gloves and the gloves are wet. Other features of structural and operative advan tage will be sufficiently understood from the previous explanations.

I claim I I I 1. A syringe shield comprising a tubular body having a bifurcated lower portion, the

The shield is then lirmly locked in furcations normally resiliently held in spaced relation, and meansco-operating with the furcations for pressing them together to removably clamp a needlebase and the lower portion of a syringe barrel or tube.

2. A syringe shield comprising a tubular body having a bifurcatedlower portion, the furcations normally resiliently held in spaced relation, means co-operating with the furcations to press them together to removably clamp a needle base and the lower por tion of a syringe barrel or tube, and a finger grip at the upper end of the. tubular body.

3. A syringe shield comprising a tubular body having a bifurcated lower portion, the furcations normally resiliently held in spaced relation, and means co-operating with the fur-cations for pressingthem together to removably clamp a needle base and the lower portion of a syringe barrel or tube, the body having in at least one side a sight opening of substantial length and width.

at. A syringe shield comprising a tubular metal body including opposite narrow portions terminating in part-cylindrical gripping members, said members being adapted to grip the lower portion of a syringe tube and being provided with chuck members conformed to receive and grip a needle base.

5. A syringe shield comprising a tubular metal body including opposite narrow portions terminating in part-cylindrical gripping members, said members being adapted to grip the lower portion of a syringe tube and being provided with chuck members conformed to receive and grip a needle base, and locking means for releasably clamping said gripping and chuck membersupon a syringetube and needle base;

6. A syringe shield-comprising a tubular metal body including opposite narrow. portions terminating in part-cylindrical grip-- ping members, said members being adapted to grip the lower portion of a syringe tube body provided with resiliently retractable gripplng members, and locking means, said gripping members including chuck formations designed to grip and secure a needle base either before or after insertion of a syringe within the body, said members also adapted to retractably grip the lower portion of the syringe, and a finger grip at the upper end of the tubular body, the parts being constructed and arranged to apply the reaction of injection pressure through the shield to the lower portion of the syringe.

9. A syringe shield comprising a metal tube having opposite side portions cut away for a substantial distance producing sight openings and also providing opposite narrow resilient strips connecting upper and lower portions of the body, the lower end of the tube being longitudinally slotted producing convergently movable semi-cylindri cal clamping members terminating in chuckjaws conformed to receive and grip a needle base, and clamping means co-operating with said clamping members to secure them in contact with the needle base and the lower portion of a syringe inserted in the shield.

Signed at Nashville in the county of Davidson and State of Tennessee this 19 day of June, A. D. 1926.

WILLIAM EVERETTE STEWART.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2559474 *Mar 9, 1950Jul 3, 1951Sonco IncHypodermic and spinal syringe
US2894509 *Jan 18, 1952Jul 14, 1959Becton Dickinson CoHypodermic syringe
US2946331 *Oct 21, 1957Jul 26, 1960Hoechst AgInjection casing for injection syringes
US4788986 *Mar 16, 1987Dec 6, 1988Harris Jim CHolder for blood collecting needle
US5709663 *Feb 6, 1996Jan 20, 1998Younkes; William E.Syringe infusion device
US6921384Sep 22, 2003Jul 26, 2005Medrad, Inc.Front loading injector with pressure jacket assembly
US6974443Jul 31, 2003Dec 13, 2005Medrad, Inc.Front loading injector system with pressure jacket assembly and syringe
US8043300Jul 5, 2005Oct 25, 2011Alcon, Inc.Handpiece tip assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/232, 604/240
International ClassificationA61M5/178
Cooperative ClassificationA61M5/178
European ClassificationA61M5/178