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Publication numberUS1671825 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 29, 1928
Filing dateOct 6, 1925
Priority dateOct 6, 1925
Publication numberUS 1671825 A, US 1671825A, US-A-1671825, US1671825 A, US1671825A
InventorsJohnson Robert W
Original AssigneeJohnson & Johnson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaging surgical cotton
US 1671825 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 29, A1928.

R. W. JOHNSON PACKAGING .SURGICAL GoT-TON Filed olct. 6, 1925 faff/c/a/swa@ Patented May 29, 1928.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.v

ROBERT W. JOHNSON, OF NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR T JOHNSON & JOHNSON, OF NEW BRUNSWICK. NEW JERSEY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

PACKAGING SURGICAL COTTON.

Application led October 6. 1925. Serial No. 60,905.

So called surgical or absorbent.l cotton is usually supplied in .rolled or folded strip form. A. vast amount is used in households; and in emergency the consumer tears or cuts a portion from the strip or roll so that regardless of the aseptic efficiency of the unbroken package there is grave danger of infection due to handling and other contaminating influences. Aside from this the nature of the package and the practice referred to obviously make for waste.

The object. of my invention is to obviate the hazard of infection and to package the cotton so that there will be no waste.

My inventive thought vwhen reduced to practice is embodied in separate cotton elements or units each of appropriate shape and size for immediate use in wound dressing, the units being superimposed and maintained out of direct contact one with the other by separators which constitute tifays whereby the units may he removed fronr the. package and applied to the wound without danger of infection; the assembled units being secured in a compressed state in a sealed wrapper of such nature as to admit ofy complete sterilization, and finally sealed within an external wrapper or carton.

The improved package -is illustrated in its preferred .form in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a perspective view with both seals broken and the upper unit in the act of being lifted; the outer seal or carton be ing broken away to disclose the inner. seal;

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view; and

Fig. 3 is a perspective View of a unit and separator in detached relation.

The improved package comprises an outer seal or carton 1, preferably of heavy papel' orcardboard, the construction heilig of the usual open-end body, with closing and sealing flaps at each end.

The cotton` cut in uniform block or other appropriate shape, is arranged in superimposed sections, each unit 2 beingentirely separate from other units and being maintianed in this` relation in thc original package by interposed separators 3 of appropriate material, as paper. The elements 3 may be slightly larger than the surface area of the cotton units and preferably are at least equal in area. The elements 3 perform the dual function of separators and trays.

'Ihe assemblage of cotton units and separators or trays is compressed and sealed in a wrapper 4, having a longitudinal joint. 5 and end seals 6. The wrapper 4 holds the mass in the desired state of compression and also admits of ready sterilization.

lVlien required for use, the carton is opened, one end of the wrapper is unfolded, and the cotton units freed of compression immediately expand, one or more of theln being projected beyond the edge of the open carton. 1n this position, the outer unit may readily bc displaced by and through the medium of its complemental tray 3. This follows as a natural result of the slight adhesion between the cotton unit and the tray, the connection being suflicient for all necessary handling of the cotton. Thus in manipulating the unit contact of the person with the cotton is avoided and there is no -danger of contamination from this source.

The package forms a convenient first-aid accessory and is particularly useful in the home or when traveling Where sterilization is ordinarily difficult through lack of proper apparatus. Its use insures that the cotton, when applied with ordinary care and by means of the trays, will be in its original sterilized condition.

What is claimed as new, is

A sterile package of surgical or absorbent cotton, consisting of a stack of separate units of fibrous or absorbent cotton whereof cach is of appropriate shape and size for immediate use in wound dressing, sterile partitions for separating and maintaining the independence of said units and of light friction material whereby the respective partition is pinchable with the associated unit to provide for sterile handling of a particular unit without the hazard of disturbing, unpacking and infecting the remaining units, each unit being condensed and the several units being collectively compacted in a sterile wrapper which admits of the individual service stated, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature. y

ROBERT W. JOHNSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2469064 *Feb 7, 1945May 3, 1949Mine Safety Appliances CoAdhesive compress
US2943628 *Feb 27, 1957Jul 5, 1960Howell William LElectrode assembly
US3288327 *Apr 14, 1965Nov 29, 1966Parke Davis & CoPackaging of surgical gauze sponges and the like
US3319625 *Jul 6, 1966May 16, 1967Paul Appleby BasilIntra-uterine contraceptive device
US3657760 *Aug 6, 1970Apr 25, 1972Kudisch LeonardCleaning pad for infant{40 s care
US4269315 *Apr 16, 1979May 26, 1981Boyce Elvin LMethod and apparatus for packaging sterile surgical masks
US4673084 *Sep 23, 1985Jun 16, 1987Tecnol, Inc.Container for dispensing surgical masks
US4765478 *Sep 8, 1987Aug 23, 1988Smith And Nephew Associated Companies PlcFor topical application of materials to skin wounds, burns; tray, support, carrier, protective layer
US4829995 *Sep 4, 1987May 16, 1989Aegis Medical CorporationFluid barrier for medical dressing
US5505305 *Jan 24, 1994Apr 9, 1996Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMoisture-proof resealable pouch and container
US5687848 *Jun 5, 1995Nov 18, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMoisture-proof resealable pouch and container
US5704480 *Jun 7, 1995Jan 6, 1998Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMoisture-proof resealable pouch and container
US6601706Sep 28, 2001Aug 5, 2003Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Package for absorbent articles
US6681934Nov 13, 2001Jan 27, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Package having visual indicator
US6705465Nov 13, 2001Mar 16, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Package for feminine care articles
US6708823Nov 13, 2001Mar 23, 2004Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Master package
US6913146Nov 9, 2001Jul 5, 2005Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Interlabial pad packaging
US7178671Nov 13, 2001Feb 20, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Package
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/440
International ClassificationA61F15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61F15/001
European ClassificationA61F15/00B