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Publication numberUS1671839 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 29, 1928
Filing dateOct 28, 1926
Priority dateOct 28, 1926
Publication numberUS 1671839 A, US 1671839A, US-A-1671839, US1671839 A, US1671839A
InventorsOwen Frederick Carlisle
Original AssigneeOwen Frederick Carlisle
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inductional water heater
US 1671839 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 29, 1928.

F. C. OWEN INDUCTIONAL WATER HEATER Filed Oct. 28, 1926 2 Sheets-Sheet A l gwventoz May 29, 1928. 1,671,839

F. C. OWEN INDUGTIONAL WATER HEATER Filed Oct. 28, 1926 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 E a 0mm,

l I attozmq Patented May 29, 1928.

um'reo STATES PATENT OFFICE.

FREDERICK CARLISLE OWEN, OF FAYETTEVILIJE NORTH CAROLINA.

I TNDUCTIONAL WATEB'HEA'IEB.

Application fled October 28, 1928. Serial 110. 144,818.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, the nature of which will become ap- 1o parrent as the description proceeds, the 1nvention consists of the construction, combination and arrangement of partshereinafter full described and claimed, and illustrated v in t e accompanying drawings, wherein; Figure 1 is an elevational view of an inductional water heater constructed in accord- 'ance with my invention,

Figure 2 is a detail sectional v1ew taken on the plane indicated by the line 22 of Figure 1,

Figure? is a similar view taken on the plane indicated by the line 3- 3 of Figure 1,

Figure 4 is a detail elevational view of the secondary coil of the heater,

Figure 5 is an elevational view of a slightly modified form of the heater,

Figure 6 is a detail sect1onal v1ew taken on the plane indicated by the line 66 of Figure 5,

Figure 7 is an elevational view of a further modified form of the heater, and

Figure 8 is an elevational view illustrating a' still further modified form of the heater.

The heater is in the form of a transformer comprising a hollow laminated core 1 through which the water to be heated c1r-' culates and of which 2 is the inlet and 3 the outlet. The core 1, which provides a closed magnetic path, may be of rectangular contour, as shown, or of any other deslred configuration, and consists of a coiled tube made of iron, steel or other suitable metal and bent or casted in the desired shape. The primary winding of the heater comprises coils 4, 5 and 6 which are distributed about the major portion of the core 1 and connected to any suitable source of current supply by leads 7 and 8. The primary coils 4, 5 and 6 may be made of iron or steel wire or tubing or' of copper .wire or tublng, and are insulated to withstand high temperatures. The secondary winding of the heater consists of a hollow coil 8 which is distributed about the minor portion of the core 1 and through which the water to be heated passes after first passing through the core. The secondary coil 8 is ofthe closed circuit t pie, and the lead 9 connecting the ends t ereof is preferably hollow. The lead 9 is in communication with the secondary coil 8 at points adjacent the inlet -10 and outlet 11 thereof. The outlet 3 of the core 1 and the inlet 10 of the secondary coil 8 are in communication and connected preferably by an insulating coupling 12.

Current flowing through the pri'mar coils 4, 5 and 6 tend to cause a magnetic ux to circulate through the core 1, and the induced current flowing through the closed circuit secondary coil 8 .tends to set up a magnetic flux independent of and opposed to that generated by the primary coils. The current flowing through the primary coils 4, 5 and 6, the current flowing through the closed circuit secondary coil 8, the primary and secondary fluxes circulating through the core 1, and the reaction taking place constantly between these fluxes in the core, heat the water flowing through the core and secondary coil to a high degree in a comparatively short time. As they extend over the major portion of the. core 1, the primary coils 4, 5 and 6 tend to confine the reaction between the primary and secondary fluxes to the minor portion of the core, with the result that the greatest possible reaction between the fluxes is attained and such reaction takes place in the immediate vicinity of the secondary coil 8 which is thus heated to a degree higher than the core 1 and subjects the water to the highest temperature as it is leaving the heater. If desired the primary winding may be made of tubing as shown in Figure 8 so as to permit the water to also circulate therethrough, and when so made the ends thereof will be connected to the core land secondary coil 8 through the medium of insulating couplings 13 and 14. The inlet end of the core 1 and the outlet end of the secondary coil 8 are provided with insulating couplings 15 and 16, respectively. As practically all the heat generated in the core 1, primary coils 4, 5 and 6, and secondary coil 8 is utilized, the heater is highly eflicient and may be maintained in 1 operation at a comparatively small cost.

The heater shown in Figure 5 diifers but slightly from the one shown in Figures 1-4. The core and primary winding of this heater are similar to the corresponding parts of the other heater. 'Its secondary winding is, however, different, and embodies a main of this heater preferably by an insulating .vide a closed circuit secondary by ho ow leads 9 and 9". 10 designates the inlet and 11 the outlet of this secondary, and the former is connected to the outlet 3 of the core 1 preferably by .an insulating coupling 12. In this heater, the water passes first through the core 1, then through the secondary coil 8 and thence through the secondary coil 8. As the secondary coil 8 is heated to a higher temperature than the core 1, and as the secondary coil 8 is heated to a higher temperature than the secondary coil 8*, due to the fact that practicall all the flux generated by the primary coi s 4, 5 and 6 threads the same, the water in passing through the heater is subjected to gradually increasing temperatures.

Excellent results have been attained from the use of the heater shown in Fi e 7. This heater differs from the others in that it is not provided with a seconda winding. The core and winding of this eater are similar to the cores and primary windings of the other heaters and are designated by the same reference numerals. An outlet pipe 15 is connected to the outlet 3 of the core 1 coupling 12". The current flowing through the coils 4, 5 and 6 of this heater, and the flux generated by the current and circulat-' ing t rough the core 1 of the heater, produces sufiicient heat to raise the temperature of water. to a high degree during its passage through the core.

From the foregoing description, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, it will be apparent that the heaters are comaratively sim le and inexpensive of manuacture, that they involve no parts a t to get out of order and subject'to wear, an that they will re idly heat water to a hi h temperature wit the use of comparative y little current.

What is claimed is 1. A fluid heater comprising a tube coiled to provide a laminated hollow core and a circuitous path for the liquid to be heated, and a primary winding on the core.

2. A fluid heater comprising a tube coiled to provide a laminated hollow core and a circuitous path for the fluid to be heated, and a.

primary winding distributed over a greater portion of the core.

3. A fluid heater comprisin a hollow core having an inlet and an out et, a primary winding on the core, and a hollow secondary winding on the core and having an inlet and an outlet, the outlet of the core communicating with the inlet of the secondary winding to permit the fluid to be heated to circu- 5. A fluid heater comprising a hollow core having an inlet and an. outlet, 9. primary winding on themajor portion'of the core,

and a hollow secondary winding on the minor portion of the core and having an inlet and an outlet, the outlet of the core communicating-with the inlet of the secondary winding to permit the fluid to be heated to circulate through both of said parts.

6. A fluid heater comprising a hollow core having an inlet and an outlet, a rimary winding on the major portion of t e core, and a closed circuit hollow secondary winding on the minorportion of the core and provided with an inlet and an outlet, the outlet of the core communicating with the inlet of the secondary winding to permit the fluid to be heated to circulate through both of said parts.

7. A fluid heater comprising a hollow core having an inlet and an outlet, 2. primary winding on the core, and a hollow secondary winding on different portions of the core and provided with' an inlet and an outlet,

the outlet'of the core communicating with the inlet of the secondary winding to permit the fluid to be heated to circulate through both of said parts.

7 8; A fluid heater comprising a hollow core having an inlet and an outlet, a primary winding on the core, and a closed circuit hollow secondary win consistin of communicating coils on di erent portions of the core and provided with an inlet and an outlet, the outlet of the core communicating with the inlet of the seconda windin to permit the fluid to be hea to circu ate through both of said parts.

9. A fluid heater comprising a hollow core having an inlet and an outlet, a primary winding on the major portion of the core, and a hollow secondary winding consisting of communicating coils and provided with an inlet and an outlet, one of the coils being on the major portion and the other on the minor portion of the core, and the inlet of the core communicating withthe inlet of the secondary winding to permit the fluid to be core having an inlet and an outlet, a primary winding on the ma or portion of the core,

and a closed circuit'hollow secondary wind- 1 ing consisting of communicating coils'and provided with an inlet and an outlet, one of the coils being on the major portion and the other on the minor portion of the core, and the outlet of the core communicating with theinlet on the secondary winding to ermit the fluid to be heated to circu ate through both of said parts.

11. A fluid heater comprising a hollow core having an inlet and an outlet, a hollow primary windingmounted-on the core and provided with an inlet and outlets, the inlet of the primary winding communication with the core, and a hollow secondary winding mounted on the core and provided with inlets communicating with the outlets ofthe primary winding, the secondary winding being rovided with an outlet, and the fluid to be eated passing through the core, and primary and secondary windings.

12. A fluid heater comprising a laminated hollow core having an 'inlet and an outlet,' a primary winding on the core, and a closed circuit hollow secondary winding consisting of communicating coils on difierent portions of the core and provided with an inlet and an outlet, the outlet of the core communicating with the inlet'of the secondary winding to permit the fluid to be heated to circulate through both of said parts and both of said1 parts providing circuitous paths for the flui In testimony whereof I aflix my sighature.

FREDERICK CARLISLE OWEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4791262 *Jul 7, 1987Dec 13, 1988Chisso Engineering Co LtdVoltage transformer type electric fluid heater
US5357085 *Nov 29, 1993Oct 18, 1994General Electric CompanyInduction heating of polymer matrix composite fiber strands
DE973991C *Sep 3, 1942Aug 11, 1960Deutsche Edelstahlwerke AgMit einem Eisenkern versehener Induktor zum Erhitzen der Innenwandungen von Bohrungen, Zylindern od. dgl.
EP0252719A1 *Jul 7, 1987Jan 13, 1988Chisso Engineering CO. LTD.Electric fluid heater
Classifications
U.S. Classification219/630, 219/670
International ClassificationH05B6/02
Cooperative ClassificationH05B6/108
European ClassificationH05B6/10S6