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Publication numberUS1673973 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1928
Filing dateJan 27, 1926
Priority dateJan 27, 1926
Publication numberUS 1673973 A, US 1673973A, US-A-1673973, US1673973 A, US1673973A
InventorsDrevitson Carl B
Original AssigneeDrevitson Carl B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Playing club and method of making the same
US 1673973 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 19, 1923. 1,673,973

C. B. DREVITSON PLAYING CLUB AND METHOD OF MAKING THE SAME Filed Jan. 27, 1926 i l I z fifi QQ ii L/ W v Patented June '19, 1928.

UNITED STATES 1,673,973 PATENT orricr.

EARL YB. DREVITSON, OF SOMERVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS.

PLAYING CLUB AND METHOD OF MAKING THE fiAME.

Application filed January 27, 1926. Serial No. cause.

volving the casting of an aluminum shell on I a core, preferabl by a die casting operation, the shell being caused to tightly grip the core by the contraction of the cast metal,

which occurs whenthe metal is solidified by cooling, the cast metal yielding during contraction, so that fracture of the shell is prevented.

Of the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification,

Figure 1 is a plan view, showing a core composed of a body portion, and a handle portion engaged therewith, in accordance with the invention.

Fi re 2 shows in section the bodyand hand e portions of the core shown by Figure 1, and a shell cast thereon, a die casting mold being indicated by dotted lines.

Figure 3 shows in perspective the playing club shown in section by Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a section on line H of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a view similar to Figure 2, omitting the mold, and showing a difierent form of the body portion of the core.

Figure 6 is a side view of another form of playing club, embodying the invention.

Figure 7 is a section on line 7-7 of Figure 6.

Figure 8 is a. side view of another form tion. V

Figure 9 is a section on line 99 of Figure 8; I

Figure 10 is a view similarjto Figure 5, showing another embodiment of the invention.

The same reference characters indicate the same parts in all of the figures.

.The head of a playing club embodying the invention comprises a core having approximatel the external form of the completed hea and a shell of aluminum, or an of playing club, parts being shown in secaluminum alloy cast on surfaces of the core, so that the shell, when solidified and contracted by cooling from a molten condition, firmly grips the core and is inseparably united thereto. The core in each of the examples shown by the drawing, includes a body portion and a handle portion engaged with and projecting from the body portion.

Aluminum contracts in cooling to a greater extent than a harder metal, such .as steel or stellite, and when'cast in the form of a shell on'a core, the shell is closely conformed to and grips the core. The ductility of aluminum is such that the shell yields during its contraction on the core, so that fracture of the shell, by its contraction, is prevented. p g

In Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4, 12 designates the body portion, and 13 the handle portion of the core; The body portion 12 is solid and may be of any suitablematerial, such as wood, or indurated fiber. The handle por' tion in this instance, is of metal, and tubular, excepting at its inner end, which may be formed as a shank 13, engaged with the body portion by screws 14 Said portions are located in a mold, the outline of which is indicated by dotted lines in'Figure 2. External surfaces of the core are se arated from internal surfaces of the mold by a space permittingmolten aluminum forced into the mold under pressure by a die cast ing operation, to completely till the space and form a shell which includes a body portion15, completely enveloping the body portion 12 of the core, and an integral sleeve portion 16, enveloping the handle portion 13. The handle portion has an extension 13 projecting from the sleeve portion 16,

'sufiicie-ntly to be grasped and manipulated by the user, so that the handle portion of the core is limited to substantially-the portion enveloped by the sleeve portion of the shell.

Any suitable means may be provided for locating the coredn the mold, such as in wardly projecting locating pins or dowels 17, held in sockets formed for their recep tion in the mold, and bearing on the body portion 12 of the core. When the molded shell and the core therein are removed from ternal surface of the ShelLtheprojecting portions being subsequently cut away flush with the externalsurface of the shell, as indicated byFigure 3. As shown by. Figurea 3 and 4, the shell completely encloses the mold, the pins 17 project from the exthe body portion of the core and is flattened at one side to form a striking face 15. When the shell is solidified and contracted by cooling, it grips the envoloped portions of the core and is inseparably united thereto, the body portion 15 of the shell'gripping the body portion 12 of the core, while the sleeve portion 16 of the shell grips the handle portion 13 of the core.

In case the body portion of the core is made of a non-refractory material such as wood which is liable to be injured by the heat of the molten metal, a coating 19 (Figure 4) of refractory material, such as'asbestos paint, may be applied to said body portion, before it is located in the mold, the coatng insulating heat fromthe core.

The body portion of the core may be hollow and made of sheet metal members, united as indicated by Figure 5, said body portion enclosing an air space.

As indicated by Figures 6 to 10, the body portion of the shell may be cast with an opening, in which some of the material of the body portion of the core is ex osed to form a striking face of material differing from that of the shell. y

In the club shown by Figures 6 and 7, the head portion 12 of the core is provided with a rojection 21, adapted to enter a socket ormed for its rece tion in the mold, the rojection' closely fil ing the socket and exten ing across thecast metal-receiving space at one side of the mold. The projection, when engaged with the mold, locates the head portion 12 in the mold cavity. The cast metal surrounds the rojection, the latter formin the margin of an opening 22 in the b0 y portion 15 of the core. The rojection may be cut away on the line a a &igure 7), to form a striking face 21", flush w1th the outer surface ofthe head portion.

In Figures 6 and 7, the inner end 13 of the handle portion 15, is shown as inserted in a socket 23, in the body portion 12, so that the handle portion is not positively engaged with the body portion. To prevent endwise and turning movement of the handle portion in the shell, I provide means for positively interlockin the handle portion with the shell. To t is end the handle portion may be rovided with a notch or recess 25, forme by pinching and indenting the handle portion, and the shell is provided with a projection 26, formed by the entrance of the metal into the recess, so that the handle portion is positively engaged with the shell.

In the form shown I) Figures 8 and 9, the body portion 12 o the core has flat sides, one of which forms a strikin face, and a beveled margin, the body ortion being preferabl of steel, or other ard metal. The shank 1 of the handle portion is attached to the inner side of the body portion, and theouter side is flush with the surrounding body portion 15 of the shell.

As shown by Figure 9, the body portion of the shell is interlocked with the beveled margin of the core body 12. In this instance, the handle extension 15 is formed separately and is inserted in the portion 13 and secured thereto by a rivet 27.

In the form shown by Figure 10, the body portion of the core is of compound construction and includes a hollow sheet metal member 28, to which the handle portion 13 is attached, one end of said member being open, and a relatively thick and rigid facing member 29, formed to fill the open end of the hollow member 28, and provided with a shouldered externally beveled enlargement 30, hearing on the open end of the hollow member and interlocked with the body portion 15 of the cast metal shell. The outer side of the facing member forms a striking face, surrounded by and flush with the marginal face formed by the mold around said member. This form may include also a strut 31, engaged with the mner side of the facing member and the closed end of the hollow member 28, so that stresses dueto the impact of the facing member on a golf ball are supported in part by the closed end of the member 28, and the rear side or wall of the shell portion 15. This construction ermits' the use of any suitable material or the facing member, such as fiber, bakelite, hard rubber, bone, ivory, or any material providing a striking face which is more desirable than one formed on the cast metal shell.

When the handle extension 13 isametal tube, it may be provided with an internal reinforcing sleeve 32, as shown by Figure 2.

I claim:

1. A playing-club head comprisi a core having approximately the external orin of the completed head, and a shell of aluminum cast on surfaces of the core, so that the shell, when contracted by cooling, grips the core, the cast metal yielding during its contraction, so that fracture of the shell is prevented.

2. A playing-club head comprising a nonrefractory core having a proximately the external form of the comp eted head, and a shell of aluminum cast on surfaces of the core, so that the shell, when contracted by cooling, grips the core and yields to prevent fracture, the core being provided with a refractory heat-insulating coating on which the shell is cast, said coating preventing injury to the core by heat.

3. A.playing-club head comprising a core having approximately the external form of the completed head, and a shell of aluminum cast on surfaces of the core, so that the shell, when solidified and contracted by cooling,

grips the core and yields to prevent fracture, the shell having an opemng in which a portion of the core is exposed and forms a striking face.

4. A playing club'comprising a core including a body portion having approximate ly the external formof the completed club.

' head, and a handle portion projecting from the bodyportion, and ashell of aluminum cast on surfaces of the body and handle portions, so that the shell, when contracted by cooling, includes a body portion which grips the body portion of the core, and an integral sleeve portion which grips the handle portion of the core, the cast metal yieldingv during its contraction, so that fracture'of the body and sleeve portions is prevented.

5. A playingclub as specified by claim 4, the handle portion being tubular and constituting a socket adaptedto receive a'separately formed handle extension.

6. A playing club as specified by claim 4, the handle portion being formed tobe interlocked with'metal of the sleeve portion of the shell, to prevent endwise movement f the handle portion in the sleeve portion. 7. The method of making a playing club which consists in locating in a mold cavity, a core which includes a body portion and a tubular handle portion engaged with the body' portion, thereby tween all of the enclosed external surfaces of the core and the internal surfaces of the mold, forcing molten aluminum into said space, and thereby forming a shell which inchides a body portion conforming to the body portion of the core, and an integral forming a space besleeve portion conforming to the handle portion of the core, and allowing. the shell to solidify bycooling, so that the body portion and the sleeve portion of the shell grip the body portion and the handle portion of the core, and yield during contraction, so that fraEture is prevented.

In testimony whereof I have affixed my signature.

CARL B. DREVITSQN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2754570 *Apr 26, 1952Jul 17, 1956Thompson Prod IncMethod of producing a cast alloy coated oxidizable metal article
US3172667 *Apr 2, 1962Mar 9, 1965Wilson Athletic Goods Mfg Co IGolf club head having a plastic striking face insert bonded to the club head material and method for making same
US3218072 *Feb 20, 1964Nov 16, 1965Pure Carbon Company IncGolf club including a striking face of porous carbon
US3659855 *Nov 13, 1969May 2, 1972Shakespeare CoGolf club head and novel method of producing same
US3817522 *Feb 20, 1973Jun 18, 1974S SimmonsForce focusing golf club
US4534564 *Jul 18, 1983Aug 13, 1985Daiwa Golf Co., Ltd.Golf club head
US4944515 *Jan 4, 1989Jul 31, 1990Shearer William BHollow golf club head with internal support
US5176383 *Oct 30, 1991Jan 5, 1993Duclos Clovis RGolf club
US5295689 *Jan 11, 1993Mar 22, 1994S2 Golf Inc.Golf club head
US5346216 *Feb 22, 1993Sep 13, 1994Daiwa Golf Co., Ltd.Golf club head
US5464211 *Sep 19, 1994Nov 7, 1995Atkins, Sr.; ClydeGolf club head
US5753170 *Sep 20, 1996May 19, 1998Muang; Mui MingManufacturing process and structure of a golf club head
US5839975 *Oct 15, 1997Nov 24, 1998Black Rock Golf CorporationArch reinforced golf club head
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/345, 164/108
International ClassificationA63B53/04, A63B53/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2053/0416, A63B53/02, A63B53/04
European ClassificationA63B53/02, A63B53/04