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Publication numberUS1674165 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1928
Filing dateJun 15, 1927
Priority dateJun 15, 1927
Publication numberUS 1674165 A, US 1674165A, US-A-1674165, US1674165 A, US1674165A
InventorsWilliam A Dorey
Original AssigneeHolophane Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Luminaire
US 1674165 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 19, 1928.

INVENTOR.

WILLIAM A.DOREY BYJMM ATTORNEYS.

June-19,1928. 1,674,165 4 w. A. DOREY I LUMINAIRE Filed June 15; 927 s Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENZOR. WILLIAM A. DORE-Y ATTORNEYS.

Patented June 19, 1928.

UNITE stars {A TENT WILLIAM A. DOREY, OFNEWARK, OHIO, ASSIGNOR 1.1. HOLOIPI-IANEV COMPANY,,INO.,

on NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION on NEW YORK. i

. LUMINAIRE.

Application filed. June 15, 1927. Serial No. 198,998.

The object of the present invention is the construction of a prismatic globe in which.

substantially all of the lightfrom the lamp emitted below the horizontal is gathered.

into a comparatively narrow strip and directed to the road surface to produce a reasonable approximation of uniform intensity.

This is accomplished by means of a combination of annular lens forms with their axes set at varying inclinations in a vertical plane (to-operating in part with prisms parallel to the plane of the lens axes and in part with vertical prisms both the parallel and vertical prisms being adapted to refract the light toward the vertical plane through the lens axes. The proportion of parallel and Vertical prism forms will depend largely on the mechanical limitations imposed on the parallel prisms by the requirementsof mold relief. While the invention has been described with reference to highway or street lighting it is adapted to many other luminaires where directional light is desired, that is to say, where it is desired to light a plurality of defined areas.

in combination .with a reflector, placed above the globe and intercepting the upward light from the lamp and reflecting it to the globe at angles permitting eflicient transmissione Such a reflector willbe approximately hemispherical in shape with the c'enter of the sphere at or near the center of the light source so that the reflected rays will pass back through or near the light, source and therefore be transmitted by the globe -i'ln much the same directions aslight'raysproceeding direct from the source to the globe. In some cases it will be desirable that portions of the vertical contour of the reflectorv will vary'from a hemispherical shape to-.

' tained,

In the drawings, Fig. 1 is an elevation of the inner hemisphere of the globe in a plane of symmetry of the structure bisectedto \show the prismatic'formation in cross secion.

Fig. 2 is an elevation of the outer hemisphere in the same plane as Fig. l similarly bisected.

Fig. 3 is an elevation of the inner hemi sphere in the plane 33 of Fig. 1 bisected to show the prismatic formation 'in' cross. section. a

.Figr 4.- is an elevation of the outer hemisphere in the plane 44 of Fig. 2 similarly bisected.

Fig. .5 is a vertical cross section in the same, plane as Figs. 1 and 2 showing the globe used in connection with a hemispherical reflector. n

Fig. 6 is a similar cross section in which 2113 contour; of the reflector has been modie "In Figs. 1,v 2 3 and 1, the construction is symmetrical with respect to Verticalplanes 7 3+3, 4 l,1-1 and 2-2 respectively, the The globe is primarily designed for use center of a hemispherical bowl 8, having a smooth interior surface 9, and on its. outer surface a series of annular lens surfaces 10. At 11.11 the lens construction on the outer surface is divided into an upper section 12 and a lower section 13. The location of the plane offdivision 1111 is determined by the vertical angle 14. Fig. 3 and is the angle at which it is desired to deliver the maxi mum intensity of light from the luminaire. Lens surfaces 15 and 16 in upper. section 12 and all those lying between, them are formedabout the axis 17, 3, and designed to refract light parallel to that axis. In order to obtain eificient. transmissionof light it is desirable that the lens surfaces lying between surface l6'and, the extreme lens'surface 18 shall not make a greater angle with. the spherical surface of the bowl 19, Fig. 3.

In lower section 13, lens surface 20 immediately adyacent to surface 11 in the upper section is formed about axis 17 and designed to emit light rays parallel to that axis. The lens surfaces between 20 and the extreme lens surface 21 are formed about axes of successively lower inclination and the angularity of the surfaces with reference to the spherical surface of the bowl is increased gradually but at a. more moderate rate of increase than in the upper section so that the light rays are bent toward the axis 17 but at increasingly divergent angles with reference to it as the extreme surface 21 is approached and owing to the systematic lowering of the angle of the axes of these lens surfaces this divergence is greater vertically than laterally thus bringing the resultant distribution of light into a wide strip in line with the roadway but not sufficiently concentrated for the best efficiency.

In Figs. 2 and 4, 22 is a hemispherical bowl having a smooth outer surface 23 and having on its inner surface smooth sections 24, and sections 25 provided withprisms parallel to plane 41-4 and sections 26 provided with prisms radial about the vertical axis of the bowl. This outer bowl is designed to envelope the inner bowl Figs. 1 and 3. The lower surface of flange 27 bowl 8, Figs. 1 and 3 rests on the upper surface of the flange 28 bowl 22, Figs. 2 and 4. Section 25 is opposed to the central portion of section 13, 3 and the prism structure on section 25 is designed to receive the refracted light rays from the lower part of the inner bowl and deviate them still more toward the axial plane so as to bring them within the beam strip required for lighting the part of the road nearest to the luminaire.

It is not possible to use this structure over the whole surface opposed to the lower section 13 of Fig. 3 because the plunger pressing this inner surface of bowl 22 operates vertically and separating surfaces between the operative refracting surfaces must relieve vertically. The extreme separating surface 29 Fig. 2 receives a portion of the light fronrthe inner bowl and refracts it outward from the plane 4-& and the resultant emission is not in a useful direction, the refracting surface 30 receives a much greater portion of the light from the inner It is important, however,

bowl and refracts it toward theplane 4- 4 and the resultant emission is useful. If this construction were carried higher in the side of thebowlthe prismfanglewould be increased and the proportion of light wasted tween the lenssurfaccs 15 and 16. The

light received by it is already deviated sufficiently so this section of the outer bowl is left smooth. Section 26 is opposed tothat part of section 12, Fig. 1 lying between lens surface 16 and extreme lens surface 18.

Light rays received by section 26 are already depressed to the required vertical angle and are refracted transversely by the vertical prisms thereon so that they are concentrated toward the plane 4-4 and assist in lighting the road strip more distant from the luminaire. In order to take care of the light from section 13, Fig. 1 which cannot be handled by section 25, section 26 is extended below the horizontal plane of division 11 in Figs. 1 and 3 to join the prismatic construction on section 25. Section 25 and section 26 merge as shown in order to merge the resultant beams from the two sections. i i

Such a construction as that described will I have a tendency to reduce the light emitted directly downward to some-what too great a degree. This is readily taken care of, however, by cutting away a small portion of the lens surfaces in the very lowest part of the inside bowl so that a certain portion of the light rays will be transmitted without vertical deviation.

In Fig. 5, 29 is a reflector of hemispherical contour with its centre at the centre of the light source 7. Typical light rays proceeding upward from the source 7 are reflected back on their paths through the source and to the globe along the same path as typical light rays 31, transmitted downward direct from the source. The reflector, therefore, increases the intensity of the light delivered by the globe without changing its distribution.

In Fig. 6, 32 is a reflector having a lower part 33 of hemispherical contour with centre at 7 and typical ray 30 is reflected back through the source to coincide with'direct ray 31, and both direct and reflected rays will be emitted by the globe in direction 41. The upper part 34 of reflector 32 is a sur face of revolution the contour of which in vertical section is that of an ellipse with 7 as one focus and 35 as its second focus. Typical ray 36 proceeding upward from the source 7 will be reflected back in direction angles and does not contribute anything to the beam at low angles.

I claim: l. A luminaire of spherical formation having on one surface a series of annular refracting ribs with axes lying in the same plane and opposed thereto a series of prismatic ribs decreasing in angularity toward the plane of the axes and lying parallel thereto, the apices of such prisms being pointed toward such plane and adapted to give a lateral concentration to the cones of light produced by the annular ribs.

2. A luminaire of spherical formation having on one surface a series of annular refracting ribs with axes lying in the same plane and of successively increasing inclination with reference to the innermost annulus and opposed thereto a series of prismatic ribs decreasing in angularity toward the plane of the axes and lying parallel thereto, the apices of such prisms being pointed toward such plane and adapted to give a lateral concentration to the cones of light produced by the annular ribs.

. 3. A luminaire of spherical formation having one surface divided into upper and lower sections each section provided with annular ribs with their axes inclined to the vertical, the ribs forming the upper section being adapted to concentrate the light rays toward the axial plane and to depress them below a definite angular limit, the lower section having ribs thereon adapted to deflect the light toward the axial plane with a more moderate degree of concentration, and opposed to such annular ribs a series of prismatic ribs decreasing in angularity toward the plane of the axes and lying parallel thereto, the apices of such prisms'being pointed toward such plane and adapted to give a lateral concentration to the cones of light produced by the annular ribs.

,4. A luminaire of spherical formation having on one surface a. series of annular refracting ribs with axes lying in the same plane and opposed to such annular ribs a central zone having prismatic ribs decreasing in angularity toward the plane of the axes and lying parallel thereto, the apices of such prisms being pointed toward such plane, and adjacent to such central zone, zones of vertical radial prismatic ribs of similar characteristics, such opposed zones being adapted to give lateral concentration to the cones of light produced by the annular ribs.

5. A luminaire of spherical formation having one surface divided into upper and lower sections each section provided with annular ribs with their axes inclined to the vertical, the ribs forming the upper section being'adapted to concentrate the light rays toward the axial plane and to depress them below a definite angular limit, the lower section having annular ribs thereon adapted to deflect the light toward the axial plane with a more moderate degree of concentration and opposed to such annular ribs a central zone having prismatic ribs decreasing in angularity toward the plane of the axes and lying parallel thereto, the apices of such prisms being pointed toward such plane, and

adjacent to such central zone, zones of vertical radialprismatic ribs of similar characteristics, such opposed zones being adapted to give lateral concentration tothe cones of light produced by the annular ribs.

Signed at Newark, in the county of Licking and State of Ohio, this 10th day of June, 1927.

WILLIAM A. DoREYf

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2474326 *Dec 18, 1945Jun 28, 1949Holophane Co IncStreet lighting luminaire
US2623160 *Apr 23, 1949Dec 23, 1952Holophane Co IncDirect lighting luminaire and/or refractor for use therein
US2662165 *Nov 29, 1950Dec 8, 1953Holophane Co IncYard and street lighting system and luminaires for use therein
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/340
International ClassificationF21V5/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V5/00
European ClassificationF21V5/00