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Publication numberUS1675335 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1928
Filing dateApr 28, 1926
Priority dateApr 28, 1926
Publication numberUS 1675335 A, US 1675335A, US-A-1675335, US1675335 A, US1675335A
InventorsDrevitson Carl B
Original AssigneeDrevitson Carl B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf tee
US 1675335 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' July 3, 1928. Y 1,675,335

c. B. DREVITSON GOLF TEE Filed April 28, 1926 [Z fif/ZJWZW? L'amZ 31?. gram/350m hug 1 fin 344 1 7 Patented July 3, 1928.

UNITED STATES CARL B. DREVITSON, 0F SOMERVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS.

GOLF TEE.

Application filed April 28, 1926. Serial No. 105,145.

This invention relates to a golf tee, formed by bending an arcuate strip of flexible sheet material to cause one of its ends to overlap the other and form a hollow cone frustum, the base of which is adapted to rest on the ground while the apex forms a seat elevated above the base and adapted to support a golf ball, means being provided for connecting the end portions of the strip to confine it in frusto-conical form.

The object of the invention is to provide as an article of manufacture an arcuate strip, adapted to be converted b a golfer into a hollow 'frusto-conical tee, the proportions of which are variable, so that a ball may be supported thereby at different distances above the ground, to enable the player to locate the ball as high or as low as his preference may dictate.

Of the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification,-

Figure 1 is a side view of an arcuate strip embodying the invention.

Figure 2 is an edge view of the same.

Figures 3 and 4 are top plan views, showing the strip converted into'difi'erently proportioned golf tees.

Figure 5 is a section on line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Figure 6 is a section on line 66 of Figure 4/ The same reference characters indicate the same parts in all of the figures.

In the drawings, 12 designates an arcuate strip of flexible sheet material, such as paper, celluloid, or of paper or cloth stiffened by wax or shellac, the strip having the form of a nearly complete annulus. The strip is cut by suitable means from sheet material, to form inner and outer arcuate edges 13 and 14:, concentric with each other, and end edges 15 and 16 in close proximity to each other, the form and proportions of the strip being such that the end portion having the edge 15 may variably overlap the end portion having the edge 16, to form a hollow cone frustum, the proportions of which are determined by the extent of the overlap, so that the edges 13 and 14 may he in parallel planes relatively close to each other, as shown by Figure 5, or more widely separated, as shown by Figure 6.

The strip is provided with a tongue 18, projecting from the end edge 15, and with a plurality of radial slots 19, formed in the end portion having the edge 16, and located at different distances from said edge. The tongue 18 is adapted to be inserted in either slot 19 and interlocked with the margin thereof, to form a frusto-conical golf tee, the proportions of which depend on the slot selected and the overlap of one of the end portions on the other.

When the tongue 18 is inserted in the first slot 19 of the series, this being the slot nearest the end edge 16, a relatively low fr'usto-conical tee is formed, the base of the tee havin a maximum diameter, and the ball seat gamed by the edge 13, a minimum height above the base, as shown by Figures 3 and 5. When the tongue is inserted in the last slot of the series, the base of the tee has a minimum diameter, and the ball seat a maximum height above the-base, as shown by Figures 4 and 6. When the tongue is inserted in an intermediate slot, the diameter of the base and the hei ht of the ball seat are between the limits own by Figures 3 and 5 and those shown by Figures 4 and 6. Any desired number of slots ma be provided and the strip may be provided with printed indexes associated with the several slots, as shown by Figure 1, and indicating the height of the ball seat provided by the engagement of the tongue with any slot. There is a separate index for each slot. In this instance, the index accompanying the slot at the outer end of the series is the fraction which conveys the information that the engagement of the tongue with this slotimparts a height of three-eighths of an inch to the tee. The index accompanying the second slot is the fraction and the index accompanying the third slot is the fraction The preferred form of the tongue is as next described.

The tongue extends obli uely from the end edge 15, as best shown by Figure 1.

A curved fillet edge portion 20, connects the inner edge of the tongue with the inner portion of the end edge 15. The outer edge. of the tongue is provided with a recessed edge portion, forming a notch 21 at the intersection of the said outer edge with the outer portion of the end edge 15. The portion of the tongue bet-ween the edge portion 20 and the notch 21, and the outer end of the tongue, is tapered to facilitate its insertion in a slot.

The arrangement is such that when the tongue is inserted in a slot, the inner end of the slot acts on the fillet portion 20, to

force the tongue edgewise and cause the notch 21 to receive the outer end of the slot, so that the tongue is not liable to he withdrawn from the slot, and the completed tee is not liable to collapse under the weightof the ball. It is therefore unnecessary to fold back the outer rtion of the tongue which projects from t e slot.

The preferred diameter of the outer edge 14 is about two and one-half inches, and that of the inner edge 12 is about seven-eighths of an inch. The S 19 are about one-sixteenth of an inch wi e.

It will now be seen that a golfer is enabled to provide a tee of the height best suit ed for his requirements, and that the operation of forming the tee is very simple and easily performed, without uncertainty as to the proper manipulation.

The arcuate strip may be so inexpensively manufactured that a olfer may discard it after each use. A pac of the strips may be conveniently carried in a pocket or a golf fclaim 1. As an article of manufacture, a golf tee blank comprising a strip of sheet material adapted to be bent to effect overlapping of its ends to provide a hollow frustum-shaped body and having means for interengaging the overlapping ends at any of a plurality of points whereby the blank will produce any of a plurality of tees of different heights, the vertical distance between the lower and top edges of each said tee being definitely and accurately predetermined.

.2. As an article of manufacture, a golf tee 'blank comprising a strip of sheet material adapted to be bent to etl'ect overlapping of its ends to provide a hollow frustuin-shaped body, a plurality of slots being formed in the blank adjacent one end at different distances from said end and the other end of the hlanl; being shaped to engage any of said slots, whereby the blank will produce any of a plurality of te of different heights, the vertical distance between the lower and top edges of each said tee being definitely and accurately pie-determined and indicated by indicia on the blank adjacent each of the slots therein.

In testimony whereof I have afiixed my signature.

CARL B. DREVITSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4136869 *Sep 7, 1976Jan 30, 1979Tassone Joseph VBall tee
US5033747 *May 2, 1990Jul 23, 1991Young Dennis RGolf tee assembly with reusable golf tees
US5503396 *Mar 17, 1994Apr 2, 1996Veylupek, Jr.; Robert J.Combination business card and golf tee
US6508728 *Aug 17, 2000Jan 21, 2003Paul John CollettiGolf tee and golf ball display
US7607998May 12, 2008Oct 27, 2009Inbong ParkGold tee and method of making
WO1995024947A1 *Mar 15, 1995Sep 21, 1995Robert John Veylupek JrCombination business card and golf tee
WO2003092825A2 *Apr 30, 2003Nov 13, 2003Montour LtdTee
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/388, 473/398, D21/717
International ClassificationA63B57/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B57/0018
European ClassificationA63B57/00C