Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1678668 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1928
Filing dateJun 2, 1923
Priority dateJun 2, 1923
Publication numberUS 1678668 A, US 1678668A, US-A-1678668, US1678668 A, US1678668A
InventorsDavid R Collier
Original AssigneeCollier Keyworth Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tilting chair
US 1678668 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 31, 1928. 1

D. R. COLLIER TILTING CHAIR 2 sheets-sheet 1v Filed June 2, 1923 July 3l, 1928.

vD. R. COLLIER TILTING CHAIR Patented July 31, 1928.

UNITED STATES 1,678,668 kPATENT orifice.

DAVID R. COLLIER, OF GARDNER, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO COLLIER-KEY- WORTH COMPANY, OF GARDNER,y MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION F MASSA- CHUSETTS.

TILTING CHAIR.

' Application mea June 2,

This invention relates to tilting chairs and provides a 'construction by which the chair may be tilted forwardly as well as backwardly from an intermediate-normal substantially horizontal position. The backof the chair is so constructed that when the seatis tilted forwardly it forms a firm back support,Y slightly 'forwardly inclined7 and when in its normal horizontal or backwardly tilted position it also functions properly as a back rest. A novel mechanism for adjusting the height of the clair is also provided.

For a. morevv complete understanding of this invention together with further objects and advantageous details and combinations `of parts, referencer may be had to the accompan-ying drawings in whichl Figure 1 is ai central vertical section through the chair.

lFigure 2 ispan end elevation of the chair iron and related parts.

Figures 3 and 4 are detailed sections on lines 3-3 and 4 4, respectively, of Figure 2.

Figure 5 is a top pla-n of the iron.

Figure 6 is aside elevation of the iron and related parts. v n

Referring to Figure 1', 1 indicates a chair base which is shown of the conventional type having legs 2 provided withcastors 3 at -their cute-rends and having a central perforation as at 4 to receive the chair rspindle 5. A 'suitable socket is formed to receive this spindle, this socket comprising a sleeve 6 in which the spindle is slidably and'rotatably mounted,this sleeve being seated within a bushing 7 which is held in position by a lower clamp-ing plate 8 made fast to the lower face of the base 1. Near litsuppe-r end the sleeve 6 is provided with an outwardly extending annular bead 9 and engaging over this: bead is a. curved annular portion 10 'ofa retaining plate or cap 11 which is made `fast to the upper .face of the base 1. This portion 10 is upwardly extended and turned outwardly to form a flange 12.- The upper end ofthe sleeve 6may also be turned outwardly as at 13 overlying this'flange and seated thereon may be a ywasher 14. The spindle 5 is threaded for an portion of its length` as shown at 15, and in engagement with these threads 'isa nut16.V vFixed to this nut is adome shaped shell 17 which encloses the nut and hides the flange 12 from view. The spindle may be retained in the 1923. Serial No. 642,900.

sleeve 6 by means of a screw 18 passing through an opening 19 in the shell so that its head is accessible from above the same, it being threaded through a lug 20 extending downwardly` from the nut 16 and being adapted to pass beneath the flange 12. By relative turning motion of the spindle and the nut 16 it is .evident that the chair may be raised or lowered as desired. In order to lock the. chair against vertical adjustment while pemnitting it to turn about its spindle as an axis, means is pro-vided for locking the nut from` turning relative to the spindle. This 'may be accomplished by means of a plate 21 having a Ahole through which ,the spindle passes and having a lug engaging 1n a keyway 22 cut longitudinally 1n the spindle. This plate has alinger 23 struck downwardly therefrom which may enter a perforation 24 in the shell. Engagement of this finger within the shell opening acts to prevent rotation of the nut relative to the spindle. y The yplate 21 is preferably formed with a fingerpiece- 25by which it may be raised to remove the vfinger 23 from the opening 24 so asto permit the height of the chair to be adjusted by .turning the nut 16 relative to the spindle. 'V

The upper end of thespindle is of reduced diameteras shown at and vpasses through a spreader or support comprising a U-shaped member 31 having upwardly extending` sides 32. An inverted U-shaped member 33 has its arms 34.extendingbetween and embraced by the sides 32 to form a substantially box shaped member, the upper end of the spindle passing through the member 33 and -being headed over at'350 thereabove. l A horizontally disposed U-shaped plate 35 has side arms 36 embracing the sides 32 and these side arms are lpivoted on a rod 37 extending through the sides 32 and also' through the arms 34 of the inverted member 33. The. base portion 38 of the member 35 is adapted to be' brought up against the rear edges of the side-s 32 which are extended above the inverted U-shaped member, these edges formingstops to limit its pivotal motion in one direction. Its motion Vis limited inthe lother direction by mea-ns of lugs39v extending inwardly from the portions 36 which strike on surfaces 40 at the opposite edges of 'the sides 32. The base 38 is normally held in fsuch position against the `sides 32 by a spring 42.`` This spring .surrounds .a

bolt 43 which extends rearwardly through the base 38, its head 44 engagmg the forward face thereof7 the spring bearmg against ran equalizer' bar 45 through which the bolt is formed angular in cross section, the hori-v zontal flange 53 overlying the upper edges of the member 35 on the sides 32, while the depending vflanges 54 extend outwardly of the side arms 36. The spider members are pivoted as at 56 to these side arms adjacent their forward upper corners and each side arm has fixed thereto a lug 57 which depends rearwardly of the base 38 and when brought thereagainst limits the tilting movement of the spider members in one direction, which it should be noted, is in the opposite direction from the limit imposed by impingement of the base 38 against the edges of the sides 32'. The upper edgesof the side arms are beveled slightly at their rear portions as at 60' to furnish stops for the tilting vof the spiderarms 52 relative thereto in the other direction, this being shown in Figure 3. The lugs 57 are normally held in contact with the base 38' by means of a spring which surrounds a bolt 66 extending 'through the base 38 and having its head 67 bearing against its forward face. At one end the spring 65 bears against an equalizer' bar 68 which has at its ends V shaped trunnions 69 engaging over angle projections 70 on the lugs 57. At its other end the spring` 65 engages against a washer 7l and the pressure exerted by this spring against the equalizer is adjustable by means of a thumb nut 72 threaded on the rear end of the'bolt 66 andbearing on the washer 71.

At the ends of the spider arms 52 are shown holes 75 forl the reception of screws 76 by which a seat 80 is fixed" in position thereto. To the rear of this `seat 80 is fixed a back 8l. which is shown provided witha forward bend or swell 82 some distance above the seat and above thisl avconcave portion as at 83'. These are so shaped that when the seat 8O is tilted forward against the pressure of the spring 65, the spider arms 52 tiltingA about the pivot 56 swinging Athe lugs 57 away from the base 38- ward. When the chair isin upright position (Figures l and 6) or tilted rearwardly (Figure 4), the swell 82 conforms sufficiently to the curve of the back to provide properV support therefor. lVhen the lseat is tilted baehwardly the member 35 pivots about the axis 37, this member 35 and the spider arms pivoting as aunit; this action being opposed by the forward spring 42 as shown in Figure 4.

It will bel noted that the seat tips for-- wardly about a pivot closely adjacent thereto and rearwardly about a pivot more remote s o that therev is little forward movement but considerably more rearward movement when the seat is tilted.` l

The mounting of the chair in this manner causes it to assume a normally mid orl untilted position from which it may be removed only by the exertion of substantial pressure in either forward or backward directions. Then in thisv mid position therefore the chair is in a stable condition in which it tends strongly to remain, though whenever it is desired to tilt it either forwardly or backwardly this may' be done by exerting 'suiicient pressure Yon the seat to overcome'the action of the springs-resisting such motion. K

Having thus described an embodiment of this invention it should be evident to those skilled in the art that manychanges andV modifications may be made therein without departing from its spirit or' scope as defined by the appended claims.

Iclaim: f* 1 l. A chair having'a seat, aspindle for supporting said seat, and pivoted about a pair of axes thereto, means permittingsaid seat to be tilted forwardly from a central portion about one of said pivots only, and means for permitting said seat to be tilted rezrwardly about the other of ysaid pivots on f 2. A chair having a seat, a spindle' for supporting said seat, and pivoted about a pair of aXes thereto, means permitting said seat to be tilted forwardly from a central' porl'sa tion about one of said' pivots only, :means for permitting said seat to be tilted rear-` wardly about the other of said pivots only, and spring means for normally holding said seat in substantially horizontal position.

l 3. A` chair iron comprising a support, a member pivoted to'said support, means for urging said member in one ldirection to its 'liti izo limit 'of pivotal motion, a pairof spider arms each vpivoted'tosaid member, and means urging said arms to` the limits of their pivotal motion in the oppositedirection.V Y I A r4. A chair iron comprising aspreader, a member pivoted to said spreader'. 'and' seatattaching spider arms each pivoted to said member. l v

(lll

ing and pivoted to said suppoi't,-means urging the base of said plate against the ieai` face of said support, apair of angle bar spider armseach having its horizontally disposed flange overlying saidcside arms and support, and its vertical flange downwardly extended outwardly of itspadjacent side arm and pivoted thereto, lugs depending from eachvertical flange rearwardly of the rear face of said base, and means for urging said lugs against said base.

7. A chairiron comprising a support consisting of a U shaped member having its sides upwardly extending, and an inverted U shaped member having its arms extending between and embraced by said sides, said sides extending above said inverted member, a normally horizontally disposed U shaped plate having its'side arms embraoingsaid sides and pivoted thereto adjacent their lower forward edges, a bolt passed through the base portion of said horizontal plate, the head of said bolt bearing against the rear face thereof, a forward equalizing plat-e bridging said sides and through which said bolt passes, a thumb nut threaded on the forward end of `said bolt, a spring surrounding said boltand bearing between said bar and nut and urging said base portion against the rear edges of said sides, and means carried by said horizontally disposed U shaped plate for supporting a chair seat.

8. A chair iron comprising a support oonsisting of a U shaped member having its sides upwardly extending, and an inverted U shaped member having its arms extending between and embraced by said sides, said sides extending above said inverted member, a normally horizontally disposed U shaped plate having its side armsv embracing said sides and pivoted thereto adjacent their lower forward edges, abolt passed through the base portion of said horizontal plate, the head of said bolt bearing against the rear face thereof, a forward equalizing plate bridging said sidesv and through which said boltl passes, a thumb nut threaded on the forward end of said bolt. av

spring surrounding said bolt and bearing between said bar and nut and urging said base portion against the rear edges of said sides, spider arms eaoli pivoted to to said side arms and overlying the upper edges thereof, said `edges being shaped to permit a limited motion of said spider arms, and spring means for urging said spider arms to one limit of their pivotal motion.

9. A chair iron comprising. a support consisting of a U shaped member havingits sides upwardly extending, and an inverted U shaped member .having its arms extending between and embraced by said `sides,said sidesextending above saidinverted member,

la normally horizontally disposed U shaped plate having its side arms-embracing said side-s kand pivoted thereto adjacent ltheir lower forward edges, a bolt passed through the base portion of said horizontal plate, the head of said .bolt bearing against the rear face thereof,y .a forward equalizing plate bridging said sides and through which said bolt passes, a :thumb nut threaded on `the forward end of said bolt, a spring surrounding said bolt and bearing between said bar and nut and urging said base portion against the rear edges ofsaid sides, angle spider arms each having one vflange overlying the upper edges of said sides and side arms,

and the other flange depending outwardly of said side arms and privo-ted thereto, the upper edges ofY said side arms being beveled inwardly to permit the seat of a chair supported by said spider arms to tilt forwardly, lugs extending downwardly from said spider arms, and a spring for urging said lugs against said base portion.

l0. A chair iron `comprising a support having upwardly extending sides a U shaped plate having its side arms pivoted to said sides and its base engageable with one edge of feach of said sides, a forward equalizer bar bridging the opposite edges of saidsides, a forward bolt passing through said Abase plate and equalizer bar, a thumb nut threaded on said bolt forwardly of said equalizer` bar, a compression spring reacting between said bary and nut, a pair of spider arms each having adownwardly extending flange pivoted to one of said side arms and having a depending lug adapted to Contact with the rear face of said base, a rear equalizer bar bearing on the rear portions of said lugs, a rear bolt passing Athrough said base plate and rear equalizer bar, a rear thumb nut on the rear end of said bolt, and a spring bearing between said rear thumbnut and said rear equalizer bar. l

ll. A chair iron comprising a support having upwardlyextending sides, a U shaped plate having its side arms pivoted to said sides and its base engageable with one edge of each of said sides, a forward equalizer bar bridging the opposite edges 1of said sides, a forward bolt lpassing through said base plate and equalizer bar, a thumb nut threaded on said bolt forwardly of said equalizer bar, a compression spring reacting between said bar and nut, a pair of spiderl arms each having a downwardly'extending flange pivoted to one of said side arms and having a depending lug adapted to contact with the rear face of said base, a rear equal.

izer bar bearing on the rear portions of said lugs, a rear bolt passing through said base plate and rear equalizer bar, ra rear thumb nut on the rear end of said bolt, a spring bearing between said rear thumb nut and said rear equalizer bar, an inwardly extending lug on each of said side arms adapted to contact with the adjacent side plate to limit the rearward tilting of said spider arms, said side arms each having its top edge rearwardly of said spider arm pivot beveled to form stops against which said spider arms bear to limit the forward tilting of said spider arms.` e

v l2. A chair having a seat, a support for said seat having a pair of pivotal connections with said seat at diii'erent distances therefrom, said seat being tilted forwardly from a mid position about the nearer of said pivotal connections, and rearwardly from said mid position about the more remote ,pivotal connection, and means for yieldingly holdingfsaid seat in said mid position.

13. A chair-iron comprising seatl supporting spider arms pivoted aboutV one axis, means to limit the tilting of said arms vabout said axis in one direction, said arms being pivoted about another axis, means to limit* signature. Y

DAVID R. COLLIER.'A

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2454990 *Sep 30, 1946Nov 30, 1948Chindlund Cecil WImplement seat support
US3049375 *Mar 17, 1961Aug 14, 1962Carlson Gustave AReclining chairs
US3726560 *Aug 23, 1971Apr 10, 1973R PageStool
US4807841 *Mar 22, 1988Feb 28, 1989Serge AbendOmnidirectionally tilting and swivelling support mechanism for chairs or the like
US4852943 *Mar 10, 1988Aug 1, 1989Phr Furniture LimitedPedestal chairs
US5026117 *Jul 18, 1989Jun 25, 1991Steelcase Inc.Controller for seating and the like
US5042876 *Jul 25, 1989Aug 27, 1991Steelcase Inc.Controller for seating and the like
US5160184 *Mar 6, 1991Nov 3, 1992Steelcase, Inc.Controller for seating and the like
US5409295 *May 25, 1993Apr 25, 1995Omniflex SpecialtiesOmnidirectional tilting mechanism
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/303.5, 297/302.4, 297/302.5, 297/344.12, 297/326
International ClassificationA47C3/026
Cooperative ClassificationA47C7/443, A47C7/441
European ClassificationA47C7/44A, A47C7/44D