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Publication numberUS1679553 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1928
Filing dateMar 23, 1927
Priority dateMar 23, 1927
Publication numberUS 1679553 A, US 1679553A, US-A-1679553, US1679553 A, US1679553A
InventorsPhilip C Waite
Original AssigneeWaite Carpet Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rug and strand therefor
US 1679553 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 7, 1928. 1,679,553

P. c. WAITE nus AND s'rnlmn' THEREFOR Filed larch 23, 1927 Patented Aug. 7, 1928.

y UNITED srA rsiaass TES PATENT OFFICE.

PHILIP o. WAITE, or osHKosn, WISCONSIN, ASSIGNOB TO WA'I-TE CARPET COMPANY,

or OSHKOSH, WISCONSIN, A CORPORATION OF 'WISCONSIN.

Rue Ann STRAND THEREFOR. I

Application'filed March 23, 1927.

In the making of rugs of a certain class, it is at present common to employ strands composed of fiber, which are subject to eel.- tain objections which the rug of the present invention is designed, to avoid. All-fiber rugs tend to soil easily, and are very hard to clean, and, .at the same time, the fiber surface affords a somewhat hard or unyieldluster, and other desirable characteristics of aiwool surfaced rug. At the same time, the

character of the fiber is such that it can be I to afford a pleasing or attractive stencilled pattern which .is not the case with a wool surfaced rug.

The present invention is designed to ob viate the objections above notedby the use of strands composed of a fiber core with a fiber core between the wool wrappings permits the use of stencil patterns, and the wool surface not only serves in a measure to protect the fiber against both soil and wear, but also cleans more readily, although the mottled or variegated exposed surface tends to conceal or neutralize the effect of soiling, so that the rug from every standpoint is more attractive and desirable than the all-fiber rug. 7

In the drawing:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a section of the rug comprising the features of the present invention; and

Fig. 2 is an enlarged strand more clearly showing the relationv of the wool wrapping to the fiber core.

The strand comprises a core A which is mg, surface which lacks the warm texture Serial No. 177,519.

sired thickness, and the core itself may be composed of varicolored constituents, if desired.

Around the core, which isrelatively thick and heavy, is a spiral winding C of yarn, composed of Wool or other material having the characteristic texture of wool, although wool is preferredin lieu of any substitute therefor. The winding C is relatively thin or light, but it affords an outstanding spiral rib of contrasting texture to the core, the surface of which is relatively hard or'harsh in comparison with the softer and fluffy surface of the wool. The core and the winding thus afford not only a contrast in texture, but in appearance,'.giving to the rug surface a mottled or broken effect, and by reason of the fact that the wool winding outstands from or protrudes above the core filler, it will afford the most conspicuous surface element in the completed rug and gives a characteristic appearance thereto.

The rug, of which a section isshown in Fig. l, is built up of strands ofthe character described which constitute the woof strands of the rug, and are secured together by warp strands D of relatively thin and inconspicuous cord which, however, serve not only tobind together the woof strands, but to holddown the wool wrappings against displacement. p

In order to afford a pleasing color body tone to the rug, it is desired to employ a wool wrapping affording a contrast in color to the core of each strand, but in addition to this general color effect, it is desired to employ tends to absorb andhold the stains. or pigments which do not readily adhere to an all wool surface, and, at the same time, the upstanding WOOl surface protects the core against abrasion, which would tend to rub away or Wear off the pigment adhering to the core surface. In this way, it is possible to secure permanent stencil designs which cannot readily be applied to all-wool rugs which lack the exposed fiber surface of the present invention, although in the present rug the stencil. also covers the wood wrapping. v

In view of the fact that the wool wrapping outstands from. the core, it-will become. the most conspicuous surface element in the completed rug, and afford a surface which most intimately comes in contact with the feet, so that both in appearance and in feel, it becomes difficult to distinguish the rug of the present invention from an all- WOOl surfaced rug save upon close inspection. At the same time, the fluffy texture afforded by the W001 Wrappings tones down the hard or harsh appearance of the fiber.

The rug is thus much superior to an allfiber rug from every standpoint in that it presents a more attractive appearance, soils less readily, and is easier to clean. At the same time, the body filler'of the rug is composed of fiber, the WOOl being conserved to afford the surface texture, so that it is possible to" secure the characteristics of an all- WOOl rug at a cost not greatly in excess of that of a cheap fiber rug.

I claim:

1. A rug strand having a core of relatively bulky hard-surfaced fiber-like material, and a relatively lighter open spiral Winding of fluffy Wool-like material outstanding from and bearing upon the hard-sufaced fiber-like core, the turns of the Winding being spaced apart to clearly disclose the hard-surfaced core, substantially as described.

2. A rug strandhaving a core of relatively bulky hard surfaced fiber-like material composed of strands thereof bundled together, and a relatively lighter open spiral Winding of fluffy Wool-like material outstanding from and bearing upon the hard surfaced fiber-like core, the turns of the Winding being spaced apart to clearly disclose the hard-surfaced core, substantially as described.

3. A rug composed of strands each having a core, of relatively bulky hard-surfaced fiber-like material, and a relatively lighter open spiral winding of fluffy Wool-like material outstanding from and bearing upon the hard-surfaced fiber-like core, the turns of the winding being spaced apart to clearly disclose the hard-surfaced core, substantially as described.

4. A rug composed of strands each having a core of relatively bulky hard-surfaced fiber-like material and a relatively lighter open spiral winding of fluffy Wool-like material cutstandin from and loearin u on the hard-surfaced fiber-like core,'the rug havmg a stencil pattern imprinted upon its surface and impregnating the exposed fiber cores, the turns of the winding being spaced apart to clearly disclose the hardsurfaced core, substantially as described.

5. A rug composed of Woof strands each having a core of relatively bulky hard sur-' faced fiber-like material and a relatively lighter open spiral Winding of fluffy Woollike material outstanding from and bearing series of Warp strands of relatively thin cord v binding together the woof strands and hold ing the wool-lie Wrappings against displacement, the rug having a stencil pattern imprinted upon its surface and impregnating the exposed portions of the fiber cores, the

turns of the winding being spaced apart to clearly disclose the hard-surfaced'core, substantially as described.

PHILIP o; WAITE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5616200 *Nov 17, 1993Apr 1, 1997Interface, Inc.I-bond method for making fusion-bonded carpet
US5616210 *May 1, 1995Apr 1, 1997Interface, Inc.Fusion-bonded carpet system
US6089007 *Jul 25, 1997Jul 18, 2000Interface, Inc.Fusion-bonded carpet system and method of preparation
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/196, 442/197, 57/210, 101/129, 428/382, 428/85
International ClassificationD04D7/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04D7/00
European ClassificationD04D7/00