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Publication numberUS1680976 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 14, 1928
Filing dateNov 4, 1925
Priority dateNov 4, 1925
Publication numberUS 1680976 A, US 1680976A, US-A-1680976, US1680976 A, US1680976A
InventorsField Frease Hurxthal
Original AssigneeField Frease Hurxthal
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Trussed structure
US 1680976 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 14, 1928. 1,680.976

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Application filed November 4, 1925. Serial No. 66,847.

The invention relates to trussed structures having spaced chord members and connecting web members joined together, and more particularly to trussed structures having crossed sectional outlines substantially similar to the outline of an I. j

The structures of the present invention embody the improvements set forth in United States Letters Patent No. 1,526,463, issued on February 17, 1925, to George Hives- Dawson and Hurxthal Field Frease, for trussed structures, and divisions thereof, together with other improvements set forth herein; and the objects of the invention are 5 to provide trussed structures whosecrosssectional outlines are preferably substantially similar to the outline of an I, and having comparatively great transverse strength, and comparatively great lateral rigidity, and which may be nailed into directly.

Because of the relative magnitude and compact disposition of their chord portions, the trussed structures of the present invention may have greater transverse stren th, and greater lateral rigidity and stabi ity than have trussed structures of the same weight and similar outlines as ordinarily constructed, such as ordinary lattice girders madeby riveting a plurality of separate lattice web bars between laterally and transversely spaced angle chord bars, or ordinary bar joists made by welding in old and well known manner a continuous zig-zag web formation between laterally and transversely spaced chor'd bars.

In the case of each of the above types of old construction, the laterally spaced arrangement of chord bars, with no interven,-.

ing material to prevent lateral deflection of the separate chord bars, renders such structures laterally unstable and exceedingly liable to failure by lateral buckling. I

Moreover, when it'is desired, as is commonly the case, to nail flooring. sheathing, metal lath, and the like to such old types of metallic trussed structures, when used as beams or joists, or as columns or stu'dding, it is first necessary to bolt or otherwise secure to the chord portions of such lattice girders and bar joists, wooden strips for receiving the nails, thereby increasing the cost of installation.

In metallic trussed structures made according to the present invention, however, nails may be driven directly into and secured in the chord portions without requiring the addition of wooden strips or; other devices for receiving the nails. The above and other objects and advantages are attained in the present invention by the use of one or more truss elements including spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members all formed from a single continuous strip, there being junction angles between the chord and web members, and one or [more of the rows of chord members being "fastened preferably at the junction angles toa plurality of laterally spaced 'chord bars extending alongside of and abutting a plurality of the chord members of the truss element.

In general the fastening of any assembled product is achieved in one of three ways: namely (1) the use ofpositive fasteners, such as bolts, screws, rivets, or eyelets; .(2). the use of some type of welding, such as electricarc, butt, spot, or flash, the acetylene flame, or direct pressure weldin of heated parts; and (3) physical or mec anical manipulation of the assembled members.

Examples of eachof the first two broad types of fastening means for the trussed structures of the present invention are illustrated and described herein, and examples of the third type are to be the subject matter of companion applications for United States Letters Patent for specific forms of the present invention.

It is to be undeistood, however, that in broad combinations including fastening means securing other parts together, it is immaterial which of the above three types of fastening means are selected to fasten parts together, thexparticular choice being "determined by the plant equipment available.

Several practical cmbodiments of the present invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings forming part hereof, inwhich- I Figure 1, is a fragmentary perspective view of one form of the invention adapted to be used as a beam or joist, the chord bars being broken away to show the truss ele- 55 chord bars and truss elements have been ment, and the fastening means illustrated being arc welds;

Fig. 2, a side elevation of another form of the invention adapted to be used as a beam or joist, differing from the construction shown in Fi 1, only in the specific form of shear rein orcement for the joist ends;

Fig. 3, side elevations ofan upper chord bar, a truss element, and a lower chord bar, therefor, ready to be assembled;

Fig. 4, an oblique view of a shear reinforcement therefor, before assembly;

Fig. 5, a vertical cross section thereof, taken as on line 5-5, Fig. 2;

Fig. 6, an end elevation of another embodiment of the invention, which may be used either as a beam or a column, and in which both rows of the junction angles of the truss element are in substantially endwise abutment with each other, the fastening meansas illustrated being rivets;

ig. 7, a side elevation of the same, portions of the outside chord bars being broken away to show the arrangement of the truss element;

Fig. 8, an end elevation of a modification of the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7, in which both rows of junction angles of the truss element are in substantially sidewise or overlapping abutment with ,each other;

Fig. 9, a side elevation of the same, portions of the outside chord bars being broken away to show the arrangement of the truss element;

Fig. 10, an end elevation of another modification of the embodiment illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7, in which one row of junction angles are in substantially endwise abutment, and the other row of junction anglesare in substantially sidewise or overlappmg abutment with each other;

Fig. 11, a side elevation of the same; portions of the outside chord bars being broken away to show the arrangement of the truss f-element;

Fig. 12, an oblique view of another form of the invention in which a plurality of truss elements are combined with a plurality of chord bars, as by arc welding, portions of the outside chord bars being broken away to .show the arrangement of the truss elements;

Fig. 13, an oblique view of a further modification of the form of the invention illustrated in Fig. 12, in which portions of the broken away to show the arrangement of all the parts; and

Fig. 14, a fregmentary oblique view illustrating the adaptability of the structures of the present invention for use in atype of floor construction in which strip metallic bridging and ordinary wood flooring may be nailed directly to the welded trussed struc- -tures hereof, used as-joists, the nails being able substance; for most practical purposes metallic material adapts itself most easily to the requirements of fabrication and use.

The preferred cross-sectional outlines of the structures as illustrated and described are all similar to the outline of an I.

Similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the several views.

Figure 1, as aforesaid, illustrates one form of the invention indicated at 20-1, adapted to be used as a beam or joist, and includes a truss element indicated at 21-1, havin spaced rows of chord members 22-1 and connecting web members 23-1, all formed from a single continuous strip or bar 24-1, which may be a round as indicated, there being junction angles 25-1 between the chord and web members, and one row of chord members are fastened preferably at the junction angles as by are welds indicated at 26-1 to a plurality of laterally spaced upper chord bars 27-1, which may be rounds as shown, and the other row of chord members being likewise fastened to a plurality of laterally spaced lower chord bars 28-1, both sets of chord bars extending alongside of and abutting a plurality of the chord m mbers of the truss element.

In order to provide a suitable end construction for pendulously supporting the joist and having adequate shear reinforcement, the lower chord bars 28-1 may be bent at their ends to form upwardly extending portions 29-1 and end portions 30-1. the end portions being preferably parallel with the upper chord bars 27-1, and there being a shear reinforcement 31-1 in the form of a suitably cut-away T-section, as shown, secured as by are welds to the ends of the upper and lower chord bars and the truss element, as illustrated.

The are welds 26-1 are preferably built up around the junction angles in a pyramidical form, as indicated at 32-1 and thus preferably join the junction angles 25-1 of the truss element to each other and to the side by side chord bars, the junction angles being preferabl in endwise abutment with each other, as s own.

The form of the invention 20-2 illustrated in Fig. 2, and adapted to be used as a beam or joist, differs from the construction shown in Fig. 1, only in the specific form of shear reinforcement for the joist ends. The structure 20-2 includes a truss element indicated at 21-2, having spaced rows of chord members 22-2. and connecting web members 23-2, all formed from a single continuous strip or bar 24-2, there being junction angles 25-2 between the chord and web members, and one row of chord memof chord members of the truss element.

In order to provide a suitable end con-' struction for pendulously supporting the joist and having adequate shearreinforcemerit, the lower chord bars 28-2 maybe bent at their ends to form upwardly extending portions 29-2'and end portions 30-2, the end portions bein preferably parallel with the upper chord bars 27-2, and there being a shear reinforcement indicated at 31-2, consisting of a pair of suitably formed angle sections 33-2, secured as by are welds to the ends of the upper and lower chord bars and the truss element.

The Figs. 3 illustrate an upper chord bar, a truss element, and a lower chord bar for the structure 20-2 before assembly.

Fig. 4 illustrates the shear reinforcement for the structure 20-2 before assembly, and

more clearly shows the exact details of con struction, including the air of formed angle sections 33-2 having the inner portions of their bottom anglelegs cut away, as illustrated, enabling the outward forming of the end portions of the vertical angle legs 34-2,

as shown, for extending alongside the outside of the truss element 21-2, as illustrated in Fig. 2. V

Figs. 6 to 11, inclusive, illustrate embodiments of the invention, which may be used either as beams or columns, and including various modifications of the truss element, and upper and lower chord shape bars here shown as being angles, the fastening means illustrated being rivets.

Figs. 6 and 7 illustrate one modified form of the invention, as aforesaid, indicated at 20-3, and includes a truss element indicated at 21 -3 having spaced rows of chord mem bers 22-3, and connecting web members 23-3 and 23'-3, all formed from a single continuous strip or bar 24-3, there being junction angles 25-3- between the chord and web members, and both rows of the junction angles being in substantially endwise abutment with each other, an chord members being secured at the junction angles as by rivets 26-3 to a -plurality of laterally spaced chord shape bars 27-3,

The truss structure 20-4, illustrated in Figs. 8 and 9, includes a truss element indicated at 21-4, having spaced rows of chord members 22-4, and connecting web members 23-4 and 23'- 4, all formed from a single continuous strip or bar 24-4, there both rows of being junction. angles 25-4 between the chord and web members, and both rows of the junction angles being in substantially 1 sidewise overlapping abutment with each other, and both rows of chord members being fastened at the junction angles as by rivets 26-4 to a plurality of laterally spaced chord shape bars 27-4.

The truss structure indicated at 20-5,

illustrated in Figs. 10 and 11, includes a truss element indicated at 21-5, having spaced rows'of chord members 22-5, and

connecting Web members 23-5 and 23'-5,

all formed from a singlecontinuous strip or par 24-5, there being junction angles 25-5 etween the chord and web members, and

one row of junction angles being insubstantially endwise abutment with each other, and the other row of junction angles being in substantially sidewise or overlapping abutment with each other, and the rows of chord members being fastened at the junc tion angles as by rivets 26-5 to a plurality of laterally spaced chord shape bars 27-5.

. In Fig. 12 is illustrated a truss structure indicated at 20-6, which includes aplurality of truss elements indicated at 21-6, cach truss element having spaced rows of chord members 22-6 and connecting web members 23-6, all formed from a single continuous strip or bar 24-6, there being junction angles 25-6 between the chord and web members, and the rows of chord members being fastened preferably at the junction angles, as by arc welds indicated at 26-6, to a plurality of laterally spaced chord bars 27-6.

In Fig. 13 is illustrated a truss structure indicated at 20-7, which includes a plurality of truss elements indicated at 21-7, each truss element having spaced rows of chord members 22-7 and connecting web members 23-7, all formed from a single continuous strip or bar 24-7, there being junction angles 25-7 between the chord and web members, and the rows of chord members being fastened preferably at the. junction angles, as by arc --welds indicated at 26-7, to a plurality of laterally spaced chord bars 27-7 and 28-7, the bars 28-7 being interposed between the truss elements 21-7, as illustrated. r

In Fig. 14 a plurality of the welded truss joist structures 20-2, illustrated in detail in Figs. 2 to 5 inclusive, are illustrated as in I bars 27-2 and 28-2, and the chord members 22-2 of the truss element, thus illustrating the practical adaptabil ty of the structures of the present invention for receiving nails and eliminating the otherwise nee ssary operation or bolting or securing nai receiving wooden strips to the chord members, as is required in other types of joists as aforesaid.

In all of the herein illustrated and described improvements of the invention, the laterally spaced chord bars having the intervening chord members of the truss elements secured between them are rendered much more laterally rigid than in the older types of structures in which there is no intervening and abutting material to prevent lateral deflection of the laterally spaced chord bars.

l\Ioreover, the addition of the section area of the chord members of the truss elements into the total chord section area of the truss structures of the present invention provides members having greater transverse strength than has been available under the old methods of construction.

All of these features enable economies in erection and in the dead weight of truss structures required for any particular purpose as for floor joists for a particular floor.

I claim:

1. A trusscd structure including a truss element and a plurality of spaced chord bars,

. the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members, all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, one of the rows of chord members abutting and being fastened at each junction angle to a plurality of the spaced chord bars.

2. A trussed structure including a truss element and a plurality of spaced chord bars, the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connectin web members, all the element members in formed from a single continuous strip, an there being spaced junction angles between the chord and Web members, and means abutting and fastening at each junction angle one of the rows of chord members to a plurality of the spaced chord bars.

3. A trusscd structure including a truss element, and a set of laterally spaced chord bars, the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members. all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, and spaced means fastening each chord member of one row of the chord members to and in abutment with the laterally spaced chord bars.

4. A trusscd structure including a truss element, and a plurality of sets of laterally spaced chord bars, the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members, all the element mem bers being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, and spaced means fastening each chord member of the rows of chord members to and in abutment with a set of the laterally spaced chord bars.

5. A trusscd structure including a truss element, and a plurality of sets of laterall spaced chord bars, the truss element inclu ing spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members, all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, and spaced means substantially at the junction angles fastening each chord member of a. row of chord members to and in abutment with a set of the laterally spaced chord bars.

6. A trusscd structure including a truss element, and a plurality of sets of laterall spaced chord bars, the truss element inclu ing spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members, all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, and spaced means substantially at the junction angles fastening each chord member of the rows of chord members to and in abutment with a set of the laterally spaced chord bars.

7. A trussed structure including a truss element, and a plurality of spaced chord bars, and means fastening the truss element to the chord bars, the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members, all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles at each row of chord members between the chord and web members, junction angles being in substantial abutment with each other and the chord members abutting the chord bars.

8. A trusscd structure including a truss element, and a plurality of sets of laterally spaced chord bars, the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members, all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, and means substantially at the junction angles fastening each of the rows of chord members to a set of the laterally spaced chord bars, and junction angles at each row of chord members being in substantial abutment with each other and the chord members abutting the chord bars.

9. A trusscd structure including a truss element, and a plurality of spaced chord bars, the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members. all of the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, and spaced means fastening some of thejunction-angles to each other and to a plurality'of the spaced chord bars and the chord members abutting the chord bars.

10. A trussed structure including a truss. element, and a plurality of .spacedchord bars, the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connecting web members, all of the element members bein formed from a single continuous strip, an there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, some of the.

junction angles being fastened to a plurality of the chord bars and the chord members abutting the chord bars.

11. A trussed structure including a plurality of truss elements and a plurality of spaced chord bars, each of the truss elements including spaced rows of chord members and connectingJ web members, all the element members eing formed from a single cono trnuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, some of the chord members -in each truss element being fastened at intervals to a plurality of the spaced chord bars.

12. A trussed structure including a plurality of truss elementsand a plurality of spaced chord bars, each of the truss elements including spaced vrows or chord members.

and connecting web members, all the element member'sbeing formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web riembers,'and spaced means fastening some of the chord members of each element to and in abutment with a plurality of the spaced chord bars.

13. A trussed structure including a plurality of truss elements and a plurality of spaced chord bars, each of the truss elements including spaced rows of chord members and connectlng web members, all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, and spaced means fastening some of the chord membersof each truss element to some of the chord members of another truss element and to an in abutment with one of the chord bars. Y

14. A trussed structure including a plurality of truss elements'and a .plurality of spaced chord bars, each of the truss elements including spaced rows of chord members and connecting web menibers, all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and web members, some of the chord members of one element being fastened at intervals to some of the chord. members of another element and to and in abutment with a plurality of the chord bars.

15. A truss structure including a set of laterally spaced chord bars and a truss element, the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connectin web members, all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip and there being spaced junction angles between the chord and Web members, some of the chord members being interposed between and abutting the set of the laterally spaced chord bars, and spaced means abutting and fastening each of the interposed chord members to the chord bars.

16. A truss structure including a plurality of sets of laterally spaced-chord bars, and a truss element, the truss element including spaced rows of chord members and connecting Web members, all the element members being formed from a single continuous strip, and there being spaced junction angles between the chord 'and web "members, some of the chord members being interposed between and abutting the sets of the laterally spaced chord bars, and spaced means fastening each 01' the interposed chord members to the chord bars. y

In testimony that I claim the above I have hereunto subscribed my name.

.HURXTHAL FIELD FREASE

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2686578 *Apr 17, 1948Aug 17, 1954Edge Alfred JNail retaining means for wire structural members
US2746580 *Sep 5, 1946May 22, 1956Benz Leonhardt WStructural unit
US3175651 *Jan 8, 1962Mar 30, 1965Keystone Steel & Wire CompanyNailable metal stud
US6149021 *Sep 11, 1998Nov 21, 2000Skyline Displays, Inc.Folding truss member for a display
US7669379Dec 15, 2006Mar 2, 2010Gerald Bruce SchierdingMetal truss system
US7730692 *Apr 5, 2006Jun 8, 2010Alliance Trutrus, LlcTruss bearing
WO2008076867A2 *Dec 14, 2007Jun 26, 2008Schierding GeraldMetal truss system
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/634, 52/692, 52/694
International ClassificationE04C3/08, E04C3/04
Cooperative ClassificationE04C2003/0491, E04C3/08
European ClassificationE04C3/08