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Publication numberUS1681799 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 21, 1928
Filing dateNov 12, 1927
Priority dateNov 12, 1927
Publication numberUS 1681799 A, US 1681799A, US-A-1681799, US1681799 A, US1681799A
InventorsClark Charles W
Original AssigneeClark Charles W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus
US 1681799 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

mg. 21, i928. lfQS C. W. CLARK GAME APPARATUS Filed NOV. l2`I 1927 5 SheS-Sh' l l l1 mnh.;

Aug. 21, 192s0 1,681,799

C. W. CLARK GAME APPARATUSr Aug, 21, 1928. 1,681,799

c. w. CLARK,

GAME APPARATUS Filed Nov. 12l 1927 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 III' Hlmlylmlih Ango 21, 928.7 1,@8L799' c. w, CLARK v GAME APPARATUS Filed Nev. 12, 1,927 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Aug. 21, 1928. 1,681,799

c. w. CLARK GAME APPARATUS `Filed Nov.12, 1927 e sheets-sheet 5 gmane/141501 m Mam C. CLARK GAIE APPARATUS Film Non ik i927 Patented Aug. 2l, 1928.

UNITED STATESh CHAR-LES W. CLARK, OF BROOKTYN, NEW YORK.

' GAME APPARATUS.

Application led November 12, 1927. Serial No. 232,732.

This invention relates to a toy golf game and an important object of the invention 1s to provide novel and advantageous apparatus adapted for such use.

Other objects relate to the provision of novel means for actuation of a golf club carried by a manikin having the appearance of a golf player; means for movingv a ball into striking position and thereafter causing a golf club to be swung to hit said ball; apparatus in which manikins at opposite ends of a runway are actuated alternately to cause a ball to move back and forth from one end of the runway to the other; apparatus including a runway with receptacles at opposite ends thereof, manikins with golf clubs and at opposite ends of the runway and adapted to be turned for aiming the clubs, and means acting alternately at opposite ends of the runway to lift a ball from one of said receptacles into striking position and then to cause the club of the adjacent manikin to strike said ball and drive it to the other end of the runway; and apparatus including manikins with golf clubs and at opposite ends of a. runway, devices adjacent said manikins for elevating a hall to positions to be struck by said clubs, chutes to direct the ball to positions to he lifted by such elevating devices, closure devices or holders in the sides of said chutes serving when in open position to cause the ball to be positioned at one side of said elevating devices, and coin-controlled means for holding said closure devices or holders open until a coin is inserted and passed through the coin-controlled means, and permitting a limited number of shots or strokes before the closure devices are again moved to open position.

In general, apparatus constructed according to the present invention includes some or all of the following features: Two manikins are positioned at opposite ends of a s runway, and journalled in said manikins are shafts furnishing supports and actuating connections for golf clubs. The apparatus is mounted in a casing divided into two compartments by said runway, the upper compartment having at its] front a glass i panel through A'which the game may be ob# served. The manikins are mounted for turn- -ing.r about vertical axes and by the manipulation of handles at the outside of the casing may be aimed to cause the ball when struck by one of the golf clubsto enter a hole adjacent the opposite manikin, when the aim is good, or to run over the end of the runway or green.

In either event, the ball passes into a chute with inclined walls directing the ball to a position over a lifting device or ball elevator which serves to raise the ball through the adjacent hole in the runway. At this time the lifting device re resents a tee and may be referred to by t at name. The tees are so connected as to be raised and lowered alternately. Each tee and the corresponding golf club may be actuated in succession, and the sets of tees and golf clubs at opposite ends of the runway may he operated alternately.

To prevent playing the game without paying therefor, each chute or receptacle adjacent a ball elevator or tee may be provided at its front with an opening which is normally closed by a ball holder. These holders are connected by a shaft urged to turn to effective positon by suitable counterbalancing means and which is turned to ineffective position to cause the ball to pass into one of said holders at one side of the adjacent ball elevator or tee, and held in such position until a coin, a nickle for example, is inserted and caused to pass through the coincontrolled mechanism. This causes a part thereof to be put under control of the operating means for the clubs and ball elevators o1' tees, for actuation thereby to cause said holders to return to effective position and remain there until a predetermined number of shots or strokes has been made and the holders have been shifted, to be held in ineffective position until another coin is introduced. In view of the fact that the ball, when struck by a club, ordinarily rolls directly to or past a hole, the manikins may be considered to be putting and the clubs may he referred to as putters.

Other features and advantages will appear upon consideration of the following description and of the drawings in which:

Fig. l is a view infront elevation of one embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a section taken on the line 2-2 of Figure l, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 3 is a vertical section parallel to the front of the case;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary view in section lli) taken along a vertical plane perpendicular to the plane of the section in Figure 3;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary top plan view of the structure shown in Figure 4, but with the parts in slightly changed position;

Fig 6 is a view similar to Figure 4 but with the parts in the same position as in Figure 5;

Fig. 7 is a section taken along the line 7 7 of Figure 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 8 is a section taken along the line 8 8 of Figure 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Fig. 9 is a section taken on the line 9 9 of Figure 3;

Fig. 10 is a rear view illustrating the means for actuating the bolf clubs; and

Fig. 11 is a perspective view illustrating a device for controlling the positioning of the ball on the top of one of the movable tees or ball elevators.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, in which the same characters designate similar parts throughout, 11, 11 indicates manikins, simulating golf players arranged at opposite ends of a runway or green 12 at the upper surface of a floor which divides a casing 13 into an upper compartment in which the playing of golf is simulated and a lower compartment in which most of the mechanism is housed. rFhe upper compartment is closed at its front by suitable transparent material, glass for example, and preferably the back wall is decorated to give the general landscape effect to be seen on golf links. As illustrated on the drawings the left hand figure or Inanikin represents a man and the right hand one a woman. j

Adjacent each golfer 11 is a hole 14 into which a ball 15 struck by a club 16 carried by the opposite golfer will drop if the club is properly aimed in making the strokes. lf the ball 15 drops through the hole 14 at which it is aimed or runs ofi' the adjacent end of the runway, it will pass into a receptacle or chute 17 which has inclined walls, by which the ball is directed, during the playing of the game, to a position over the cupped upper end of a vertically reciproca` ble ball elevator or tee 18 in the form of a plunger in alignment with the corresponding hole 14 so that it may be used to place the ball in position to be struck by the club 16 of the adjacent golfer.

For reasons to be brought out more fully hereinafter each chute 17 is provided with a suitable opening, preferably at its front 'and near the bottom thereof, and this opening is closed by a frame or holder 19 normally in clos-ed position but swingable outwardly to hold the bali at one side of the ball elevator so that it cannot be raised thereby. Fre these frames are connected by a 20 and are--formed from memos the ends of a wire which serves as said shaft.

The shaft of each club 16 is attached to a shaft 21 passing through the corresponding manikin and journalled therein and is suitably connected with the hands of the manikin, the joints at the shoulders and elbows being of any suitable flexible construction, swivel joints for example. To enable the golf clubs to be turned to the proper angle or aimed, each manikin 11 is pivoted to turn about a vertical axis and this may be effected by securing such manikin to the upper end of a vertical shaft 22 extending -into the lower compartment of the casing and provided with an arm 23 curved around the adjacent end of the corresponding chute 17 and projecting through a slot in the front wall'of the casing where it is provided with a suitable handle 23. Preferably the feet of the manikins 11 are held just high enough above" the floor to avoid interference with the turning of the manikins to place the clubs at the proper angles.

Each shaft 21 passes through an opening in the back wall of the casing and to permit turning of the corresponding manikin about the axis of its support, such opening must be in the form of a horizontal slot of a length to permit the necessary adjustment of the manikin to set the corresponding club' 16 at the proper angle. Fixed to each shaft 21 back of the rea-r wall of the casing is a lever 24 having a weighted arm 25 extending inwardly from the end of the casing and a downwardly inclined arm 26 extending outwardly. Each arm 25 is ordinarily supported in a substantially horizontal position by a helical spring 25 attached at its upper end to a fixed part of the apparatus and under such conditions the corresponding golf club is in the position shown at the left of Fig. 10 or the inner position indicated at the right of the figure. Actuation of each club 16 is effected by engagement of the corresponding arm 26 by means in part of Fig. 10 and to be described more fully hereinafter.

Alternate operation of the ball elevators or tees 18 may be effected by any suitable means. 1n the illustrated embodiment of the invention, this result is obtained by means of a lever or bar 27 mounted on a fixed central pivot 28 and connected by pin and slot connections with the lower ends of the ball elevators 18.

Operation of the olf clubs 16 and the ball elevators may be e ected by shafts 29 passing through the casing from front to back below the. runway 12 and at opposite sides of the middle thereof. Each of these shafts is formed with a crank 30 (Fig. 8) for raising the adjacent end of the lever 27, and a crank 31 Y(Fig. 10) at the rear of the casin Each crank 30 is connected with the adjacent end of the lever 27 by a link 32 hav- Ils ing a long loop enclosing the lever arm and guided thereon to retain the proper position relative thereto.

Each crank 31 is connected by means'of a link 31" and a pivot 33 with an arm 34 rotatable about the fixed aXis of a pivot 35.,

The pivot 33 projects into the plane of the arm 26 and when actuated from the crank 31 engages the arm, shifts the lever 24 and club 16 (as indicated at the right of Fig. 10), and as the movement continues slips off the end of the arm 26. The club 16 is then returned, under the urging of the spring 25', and swings ast 4its normal position far enough to strike a ball in striking position on the adjacent elevator.

Assuming the parts to be in the positions indicated in Fig. 3, operation of the right hand crank shaft 29 may' be effected by a handle 36 attached thereto at the front of the casin The right hand end of the lever 27 will t en be raised until the crank 30 reaches its highest position. Upon further movement of the shaft 29, the link 32 will move downwardly but, due to its loop form, will have no effect on the lever 27 which will be retained in position by frictional contact with leaf springs 37 (Figs. 3 and 9). The ball 15 is then held in raised position bythe right hand ball elevator or tee 18.

The crank 31vis turned upwardly at the same time as the crank 30 and causes the corresponding pivot 33 to engage the actuating arm 26 for the right hand club 16 and swings the club outwardly. The pivot 33 does not, however, slip olf the end of the arm 26 until the crank 31 has been moved past its upright position, thus assuring positioning of the ball in striking position before the striking movement of the club takes place. The rotation of the crank shaft may then be continued until it reaches its starting position. The ball 15 will ordinarily drop into the receptacle or chute 17 at. the

opposite end of the runway and the'operation just described may be repeated at that end by turning the handle 36 at that end of the casing.

At times, the ball 15 may come to reston the runway, thus stopping the operation of the apparatus. To enable the ball to be returned to one of the chutes or receptacles 17, there is provided means (Figs. 1 and 2) including a member or block 38 slidable horizontally inv a slot 39 (Fig. 7) in the front of the casing and a lever. 40 ivoted to the block and normally in the ull line position of Fig. 2 with its handle end projecting just far enough from thefront of the slot 39 to enable the handle end to be pulled out preparatory to returning a ball to one of the chutes orguides. The 'lever 40 `may merely be swung about its pivot or in addi;

tion to the movement of the lever .about its pivot the block 38 'may be moved along the slot.

The description of the game apparatus proper has now been completed. In practice, however, the game apparatus is preferably provided with coin-controlled mechanism which prevents operation until a coin, a nickle for example, has been inserted and passed through the coin-controlled device. Playing of the game may be prevented by turning the holders 19 forwardly so that a ball 15 in either one of them will be to one side of the upper end of the corresponding ball elevator 18. The holders 19 are connected by a shaft 2O and in oi'der to maintain the holders in closed position the shaft 20 is provided with a crank 45 carrying a counter weight 46 of which the downward movement is limited by means of a fixed stop or support 47. It will bel evident that the crank 45 provides a convenient form of arm projecting from the shaft 20.

To rock the shaft Y2O in the opposite direction provision is made of a downwardly and forwardly inclined arm 48 which is conveniently made in the form of a crank or loop of the wire of which the shaft 20 is formed. This arm or loop 48 is the means through which the coin-controlled mechanism controls the playing of the game. The condiltion of the coin-controlled mechanism before insertion of a coin and the passage of the same through the mechanism is illustrated in Figures 5 and 6, the arm being held in its left hand position by means of a pin or stud 49 project-ing from a toothed wheel 50 forming part of a rotatable device 51 journaled in a U shaped bracket 52.

Pivoted on the side of the bracket 52 which lies beneath a coin guide 53, in an arm 54 which serves to engage the pin 49 and turn the device 51 to carry thc pin 49 to its lower dotted line position (Figure 6), thus permitting the arm 48 to swing to the right and come into the positionshown in Figure 4 with the counter weight 48 resting on the support '47, and placing the game apparatus in condition for use. This movement of the arm 54 is effected bymeans including a link 55 pivoted at one end to the arm 54 and at the other end to a lever 56 mounted on a iiXed pivot 57 and projecting through a slot in the upper side of the coin guide 53.

When a coin 58l is dropped into a slot 59 at the front of the casing it enters the coin guide 53 and passes on edge along the guide until itv comes into contact with the lowerl end of the lever 56. It is then located just to the left (Figures and 6) of an arm 60 o-which the tip is positioned to enter a slot 59a at the rear of the guide as seen in Figure .6. This arm 60 forms part of a bent lever the casing and terminating in a handle 64. If when the coin rests against the lever 56 (Figure 6), the handle 64 isforced to the left, the arm 60 will force the coin 58 to the left and thereby rock the lever '56 from its full line position against the action of a spring 56 to its dot-and-dash position, thus turning the toothed wheel 50 far enough to release the arm 48 and thus permit the frames or holders 19 to be moved to closed position by the counter weight 49. As soon as the coin A58 is forced past the tip of the lever 56, it willdrop into a suitable receptacle 53 (Fig. 3).

The toothed wheel 50 may be held against backward movement by means of a pawl (Fig. 6). Connected with the toothed wheel 50 to rotate therewith and positioned at the opposite side of the U shaped bracket 52 is a disc 66 which is provided at its front face (Fig. 6) with a plurality of pins 67. These pins 67 are five in number and are equally spaced around the periphery of the disc with the exception that the space between the upper and right hand pins in .Figure 6 1s greater than the other space by the distance between the right hand pin in full lines and lthe dotted line position immediately thereabove. When the pins 67 are in their full line positions (Fig. 6), the right hand pin 67 supports an extension of a pawl 68 pivoted on an upright arm of a bell crank lever 69 which turns about the axis of the disc 66 and the toothed wheel 50.

Said crank 69 is connected by a link 70 with the lever 27 at the left of the pivot 28, and, when the parts are in the position shown in Figure 6, turning of the handles 36 will rock the lever 27 back and forth to raise and lower the ball elevators and operate the golf clubs. Inasmuch, however, as the ball holders are held open by engagement of the arm or loop 48 with the in 49, Athe ball 15 is held out of the aths o the ball elevators and, therefore, wil not be raised into position for use. During this rocking of' the levers 27, the pawl 68 will move back and forth idly on the right hand pin 67 (Fig. 6). When, however, the rotatable device 51 is advanced, as already described, through operation of the handle 64 after the insertion of a coin the right hand tooth 67 (Fig. 6) -is turned to its dotted line position where it may` be veffectively engaged by the pawl 68 urged thereagainst by a spring 71.

Then, as the lever 27 is rocked back and forth, each downward movement of the left hand end thereof will serve, through the pawl 68', to' turn the rotatable device 51 through an angle'corresponding to the distance between'the irstand second pins 67 and each upward movementof the left hand arm of the lever 27 will return the pawl to position to engage the next pin 67. When, however, the pawl 68 actuates the discv66 by engagement with the fifth pin 67, the first pln will not be advanced suiiiciently to enable it to be actuated by the pawl and the parts will again be in the position shown 1n Fig. 6.

There will be no change in the position of the arm 47 during the actuation of the device 51, until the pawl 68 after engaging the fifth pin, as shown in Figure 4, turns the dlsc 66 to the original position, shown .in Figure 6. During this movement, the pin 49 will restore the arm 48 to its Figure 6 position and throw the holders 19 to open position. The ball 'l5 will then be kept out of use until the rotatable Adevice 51 has again been rotated, after insertion of a coin, to place the first tooth 67 under the control of the paw168.

It should be understood that various -changes may be made in the apparatus and that certain parts ma be used without others without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

l. In a toy golf game, a runway, manikins at opposite ends of said runway, clubs connected with said manikins, devices adjacent said manikins for elevating a ball into position to be struck by said clubs, and connections between such elevating devices to cause vthem to act alternately.

2. In a toy golf game, a runway, manikins at opposite ends of said runway, clubs connected with said manikins, devices adjacent said manikins for elevating a ball into positions to be struck by said clubs, and means to prevent actuation of said clubs until the cor'esponding elevating devices have actuate 3. In a toy golf game, having an outer casing, a manikin, a'club associated therewith, controlling means actuable from the outside of the casing to position a ball in the path of said club and thereafter causing -said club to strike the ball, and means for preventing said controlling means from acting on said ball.

4. In a toy golf game enclosedin a casing, a runway, manikins with clubs at the ends of said runway, elevating devices beneath said manikins for lifting a. ball to positions to be struck by said clubs, guides at each end of the runway to oplace said ball on said elevating devices, means actuable from the outside of the casing for effecting operation of said elevating devices and clubs, and means for modifying the effect of said guides to prevent the ball from being on said elevating devices when-they are operated.

5. In a toy golf. game enclosed in a cas- 'ing and played from the outside thereof, a

runway, manikins with clubs at the endsof said runway, elevatingdevices adjacent said manlklns for lifting a ball to positions to Cil 'and operable from the outside thereof, a runway, manikins with clubs at the ends of the runway, elevating devices for lifting a ball to position to be struck by said clubs, guides to direct said ball on said elevating devices, and coin-controlled means for maintaining "such 'a relation between the guides and elevating devices as to prevent the presence of the ball on the elevating devices and operable through an inserted coin to permit the presence on the elevating devices for a predetermined but limited number ofstrokes of the clubs.

7. In a toy golf game having a casing, a manikin, a club associated therewith, means controlled from outside the casing for aiming the club, means operable from outside the casing to position a ball in -the path of said club and thereafter cause said club to strike the ball, and coin-controlled means for preventing such positioning of the ball in the path of theclub but operable upon insertion ,of a coin to permit such positioning only for a definite number of strokes.

.8. In a toy golf game, a runway having at each end a hole to receive a properly aimed ball from the opposite end, a vertical-- ly movable tee beneath each hole to raise a ball through said hole in position to be knocked toward the other end of the runway,

means for alternately elevating said tees including a centrally pivoted lever connected with said tees.

9. In a toy golf game, a figure mounted to turn about a vertical axis, a golf club pivoted on said ligure, and means for holding the golf club..in partially retracted position and adapted when the cluby is swung back and released to cause the club to move past its normal position and to a ball striking position.

10. A toy golf game having a runway provided with a ball-receiving opening adjacent to each end thereof, a chamber beneath each opening for 4receiving the ball, a plunger member in each chamber vertically movable to the corresponding opening to lift the ball from the chamber and support it above the opening, and means adjacent to each end of the 'runway for knocking the ball along the runway toward the opposite en 11. A toy golf game having a runway provided with a ball-receiving opening adjacent to each end thereof, a chamber beneath each opening for receiving the ball, a plunger member in each chamber vertically movable te the corresponding opening to lift theball from the chamber and-support it above the opening, means adjacent to each end of the runway for knocking the ball along the runway toward the opposite end, and means operating said plunger members alternately.

12. A toy golf game having a runway provided with a ball-receiving opening adjacent to each end thereof, a chamber beneath each opening for receiving the ball, a plunger member in each chamber vertically movable to the corresponding opening to lift the ball from the chamber and support it above the opening, means adjacent to each end of thel runway for knocking the ball along the runway toward the opposite end, and means on each chamber for holding the ball out of the path of the plunger, thereby preventing lifting of the ball into playing position.

13. A toy golf game having a runway -provided with a ball-receiving opening adj acent to each end thereof, a chamber beneath each opening for receiving the ball, a plunger member in each chamber vertically movable to the corresponding opening to liftthe ball from the chamber and supportit above the opening, means adjacent to each end of the runway for knocking the ball along the runway toward the opposite end, and a rock shaft having arm portions adjacent to opposite ends thereof for holding the balls out of the path of the plunger members, and thereby preventing playing 0f the game.

14. A toy golf game having a runway provided with a ball-receiving opening adjacent to each end thereof, a chamber beneath each opening for receiving the ball, a plunger member in each chamber vertically movable to the corresponding opening to lift the ball from the chamber and support it above the opening, means adjacent to each end of the runway for knocking the ball along the runway toward the opposite end, a lever pivoted intermediate of its ends and having its opposite ends engaging with said plunger members, and separate means adjacent to opposite ends for lifting the corresponding end of said lever and depressing the opposite end.

Signed at New York, in thecounty of New York, and State of New York, this 11th day of November A; D. 1927.

CHARLES W. CLARK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5393058 *May 5, 1993Feb 28, 1995Rowland; BruceRobot golf game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/108.22, 194/295
International ClassificationG07F17/32, G07F17/38
Cooperative ClassificationG07F17/38
European ClassificationG07F17/38