Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1681817 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 21, 1928
Filing dateJun 7, 1926
Priority dateJun 7, 1926
Publication numberUS 1681817 A, US 1681817A, US-A-1681817, US1681817 A, US1681817A
InventorsSmall Arthur E
Original AssigneeUnion Metal Prod Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Metallic structure for railway cars
US 1681817 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. E. SMALL METALLIC STRUCTURE FOR RAILWAY CARS AAug. 1,21, 1928.

Filed June '7, 1926 2 Sheets-Sheet l WT L M dllo ololmlolmloooollolwloeaooooo onoaonooo o n o o o o o o o o o o o wmlolwwlololwlq o olwlollo uw A oooooooooo @numana Aug. 2l, 1928. 1,681,817

A.E. SMALL METALLIC STRUCTURE FOR RAILWAY CARS Filed June 7, 1926 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Ilo Patented Aug. 21, 1928.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ARTHUR E. SMALL, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR TO AUNION' METAL PRODUCTS COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.

METALLIC STRUCTURE FOR RAILWAYv CARS.

Application led June 7, 1926. Serial No. 114,246

Reference is made to the accompanying drawings, which illust-rate the preferred form of the invention, though it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the exact details of construction shown and described, as it is obvious that various modifications thereof within the scope of the claims will occur to persons skilled in the art.

VMy invention relates to the construction of railway cars and more particularly to metal end structures or walls forrrailway cars made ot one or more metallic plates or panels formed with integral reinforcing, ftittening and bracing corrugations or embossments. However, this device may be incorporated in the construction of car side walls, ioors, roofs or doors used in connection with railway cars ot various types. i

It is well known that the cnd walls ot railway cars are more likelv to be broken or otherwise injured than the side walls. This is due to the inertia thrusts and pressures causedby the shitting ot the cargoes when the train starts or` stops. These thrusts may be local, tending to distort the end in some particular spot, as, tor example` when a piece of piping or lumber shifts lengthwise imparting a blow against the end wall of the car; or there may be a general tendency to break out the end wall as al whole or tear it away from the fra-mino?. For the purpose, therefore, of greater strength and durability, car ends have been constructed of metal plates corrugated or formed with rib-s to impart the desired strength, rigidity and resiliency.

One ot the principal objects of my invention is to provide a corrugated orembossed metallic end structure for railway` cars in which the corrugations or embossments have` a configuration and arrangement that impart to the structure a maximum capacity for resisting cargo thrusts. both local and general, and with sufficient resiliency to prevent permanent distortion dueV to the thrusts otV i" provide a metallic wall element with corrugations or embossments that resist to a. greater' degree torsional stresses, as well as brace the element, and the car end against diagonal side thrusts or weaving.

The combination of the embossments, ribs lor corrugations comprising the reinforcement formed in the metallic plate is disclosed and claimed in my separate application for patent, Serial No. 5520i", filed September 8, 1925, and this application for patent ldiscloses and claims the specilic advantages and constructions when such a reinforced vertical plate is applied to a car with the corrugations or reinforcements positioned vertically or substantially so, i. e., extending trom adjacent the tloorof the car (or end sill) to adjacent the roof (or end plate.) The metallic reinforced plates comprising the wall are usually connected along vertical lines, and the middle plate or plates may be made of thicker metal than those adjacent the side ot the car and the corrugat-ions in the middle ofthe car end wall may be made stronger than those elsewhere by being made deeper or wider or both. Also the corruga- Vtions in the middle of the car end wall may be made longer to eliminate any flat space between the upper end of the corrugations and the end plate or roof of the car.

The maximum pressure and rstress on a car end wall is about two feet above the floor and adjacent the middle of. the car. The corrugations are a series of parallel beams and when positioned vertically the lower ends of these beams are supported by thc underframe which is the backbone of the car and the upper ends are supported by the endplate. A beam should have its maximum strength adjacent its point of maximum stress, therefore, I prefer to have the strongest part of the individual corrugation, as well as the entire end wall. about two feet from the floor or about one-fourth the length of the corrugation.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is an end elevation of a box car equipped with my invention.

Fig. 2 is av section on line 2,2 of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is an Vend elevation ot a gondola car equipped with my invention.

Fig. 4 is a section on line 4 4 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged front view ot a corrugated plate.

Fig. 6 is a top view of Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is a section on line 7-7 of Fig. 5.

llU

Fig. 8 is a section on line 8 8 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 9 is a section on line 9 9 ot'l Fig. 5.

Fig. 10 is an enlarged section of a portion of the plate showing a modiiied form on line 7 7 oi' Fig. 5. f

Fig. 11 is an enlarged section of a portion of the plate showing a modified form on line 8 8 oit Fig. 5.

Fig. 12 is an enlarged section of a: portion ot the plate showing a modied -form on line 9 9 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 13 is an enlarged section of a portion of the plate showing a modified form online 7 7 of Fig. 5.

Fig. le is an enlarged section oit a portion of thek plate showing a modiiied i'orm on line 8 8 otFig. 5.

Fig. 15 is an enlarged section of av portion of the plate showing a modiiied form on line 9 9 ol' Fig. 5.V l

Fig. 16 is an enlarged section oi a portion of the plate on line 7 7 of Fig. 5.

(Fig. 17 is an enlarged section ot a portion of the plate on line 8 8 of Fig. Y

Fig. 18 is an enlarged section of a portion of the plate on line 9 9 ot Fik Lilie characters of reference t' arts. Y The end wall structure shown in the above figures comprises a panel composed of a corrugated metal plate or plates.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2. The corrugated plates 1, 2 and 8 entend across the car 'from' top to bottom and are formed with integral flanges 4; along the vertical edges which overlap and are secured to the side walls 5 of Vthe car by any suitable'means.

The top edge of the end wall' is secured beneath the tascia boards 7 and the meeting edges of the plates' overlapjand are secured together by rows of rivets 8 and the lower edge of the end wallfis secured tothe end sill 9.

' Figs. 3 and d show the invention applied to a.` gondola type of ear, wherein only one plate 12 is used to form the end panel which .extends from side to side of the carand is pro- 5. esignate like vided along the vertical edges with tlanges'l-B which overlapand are secured to the side walls lflfby any suitable means. rIhe top edge of the plate issecured to the top chord 15'by rivets V167 while. the lower edge is secured by rivets 17 to the end sill 18. l

While the corrugations are shown pressed outwardly, it is vunderstoodthat the corrugations may be pressed inwardly, orpartially inwardly and partially outwardly from the original plane of the plate; rlhe plates or panels maybe applied to any typeY oi' railway ear.

Figs.,5 to 9 inclusive show the preferred form. wherein the plate is provided with a plurality oi major corrugations 31 with preferably flat apices 36 which are spaced apart distances substantially equal to their respective widths the part 38 of the plate between the major corrugations are also preferably flat sotliat the coniiguration (see F ie. 7) is symmetrical in cross section about a line midway oetween the outermost'portions of these major corriniations, which line is the neutral axis ot' the section. Such a section is very strong on account of the amount of metal positioned away from the neutral axis and also relatively rigid. These major eorrugations 31 decrease in width toward their opposite ends7 and the apices change from ailat to an arcuate conliguration. The metallic plato is also'V provided with a plurality of pairs of aligned minor corrugations 32 which liebetween adjacentmaj or corrugations liwith their inner ends preferably terminating into the plate adjacent each other and with 'their outer ends terminating into the plate in line with the outer ends of the major corrugations. Y Y

The outer ends of the minor corrugations 82 have arcuate apices and the part of the plato between these outer ends of' the minor corrugations and the outer ends of the major load, anch furthermore. -produces very strong section `for the amount of metal used. -rlhe minor 'andmagor corrugations merge into the planeet the plate by means of terminal portions 4G of any desired formation. *By such an arrangement a corrugated metallic Yp; te is pr "'ded which is relatively rigid adjacent the 'floor ciethe car and relatively resilient a' "ent the opposite end portions the corri tions.

and 18 are detailed enlargementso portions of a plate on lines-7, 8

and9, respectively, of Fig.

Fi 2G shows the relatively wide fiat apices 8G formed by lhe'major corrugations 31. The sloping `sides 87 a d the cursed' portions 38 connect the Yflat apices 3G to the original plane of the plate.

Fig. 17 shows the minor corrugations 32 pressed outwardly between the major corrugations 81. i' Y Y F ig. 18 shows the corrugations and uni- ;t'orm convergence ofthe major and minor corrugations just before merging int the original plane 35 of the plate 30.

Figs. 10, 11 and 12 a detailed enlargements of a nioed form of corrugation similar toxFigs. rtl, 17 and 18 wherein the major corrugations have arcuate apices 40 and the portions of the `plate between the major corrugations is also of arcuate configuration.

Fig. 11 shows the minor'corrugations 32 pressed outwardly between thel major corrugations 31 midway between the center and termination of the corrugations at 34.

Fig. 12 shows the Contiguous and uniform convergence of the. or and minor corrugations just before merging into the original plane 35 of the plate 30.

Figs. 13, 14 and 15 are detailed enlargements of a modified form of corrugation similar to Figs. 16-18 and 10-12 wherein the corrugations are truncated.

The flat apices are joined by sloping sides and curves.

Fig. 13 shows the relatively wide Hat apices 42 formed by the maj or corrugations 31. The sloping sides 43 and the curved portions 44 join the flat apices of the corrugation to the original plane 35 of the plate 30.

Fig14 shows the minor-corrugations 32 pressed outwardly between the major corrugations 31. Y

Fig. 15 shows the contiguous and truncated convergence of the major and minor corrug. tions just before merging into the original plane 35 of the plate 30.

Themajor corrugations are preferably of uniform width for a short distance adjacent their middle to provide greater strength for a greater portion of the plate and also to facilitate the changing of the forming dies when it is desired to increase or decrease the length of the corrugations or embossments.

A plate provided with a plurality of contiguous narrow corrugations possesses a considerable amount of elasticity and when struck a blow deiects readily and regains its shape without distortion, whereas a plate provided with wide flat corrugations, though better able to carry quiescentloads, has not the resiliency of the former and is more readily distorted when struck a blow.

It is, therefore, desirable to design a plate that possesses great strengthto withstand the sudden impact loads or blows, with sufficient resiliency to resist distortion.

This application is confined 'to the construction wherein the minor corrugations merge with the major corrugations, whereas in my application Serial No. 595,634, filed October 19, 1922, I have shown and claimed a construction wherein the major corrugation is split into two or more minor oorrugations.

I have described and claimed the corrugations as being that portion of the reinforcement between the terminations or between lines corresponding to 9 9 in Fig. 5. The terminations are the conical or pointed portions, such as 46 in Fig. 5. j

Y This is a continuation'in part of my application Serial No. 55,207 led September 1. A wall structure for a railway car comprising a plurality of metallic plates secured together along vertical lines, each plate provided with a plurality of parallel vertical major corrugations decreasing in width towards the terminal thereof adjacent the edges of said plate, a plurality' of minor corrugations lying in a plane between said major corrugations, said minor corrugations merging from the plane of said plate at the center thereof and increasing in width and depth towards the terminals adjacent the edges of said plate.

2. A wall structure for a railway car comprising a plurality of metallic plates secured together along vertical lines, each plate provided with a plurality of major and minor vertical corrugations, said major corrugations projecting from the original plane of said plate forming a uniform cross section with flat apices diminishing in width towards the end of said corrugations where said major and minor corrugations merge and become contiguous and of a sinuous formation.

3. A wall structure for a railway car comprising aplurality of metallic plates secured together along vertical lines, each plate having a plurality of major and minor` vertical corrugations, terminating Within the plate, said major corrugations formed with fiat apices decreasing in width toward the ends of said corrugations, said minor corrugations positioned between said major corrugations merging from vsubstantially the center and the plane of the plate, and increasing in depth and width until they merge with said major corrugations to form a contiguous configuration of uniform cross section.

4. A wall structureffor a railway car comprising a plurality of metallic plates secured together along vertical lines, each plate having a plurality of major and minor vertical stifening corrugations of varying cross sections throughout the greater portion of their length but merging together forming a cross section uniform in depth, width and shape symmetrical about a line midway between the outermost portions of the corrugations.`

5. A wall structure for a railway car comprisingva plurality of metallic plates secured together along vertical lines, each plate provided with a plurality of major and minor vertical corrugations, said major corrugations being widest, contiguous and symmetrical and provided with fiat apices diminishing in width toward the end of said corrugation where said major and minor corrugations merge and become contiguous, symmetrical and parallel for a short distance just before merging into the original plane of the plate.

6. A wall structure for a railway car comprising a plurality of metallic plates secured 4together along vertical lines, each plate havlil Y together along Vertical lines,

ing a plurality of major and minor Vertical corrugations terminating Within the plate, said major corrugations decreasing in Width toward the ends, said minor ycorrugations positioned betweensaid major corrugations merging` trom the plane of the plate and increasing in depth and Width until they merge with said major corrugations tov form an arcuate contiguous configuration of uniform iross section. y f. A Wall structure fora. railnfay'car comprising a plurality ol metallic plates secured each plate having` a. plurality-ot sinuous and contiguous major and minor vertical corrugations terminating. Within the plate. said major corrugations decreasingv in Width toward the ends, said minor'corrugations positioned between said major oorrugations merging from the plane ot the plate and increasing' in depth and Width untilthey merge with said major corrugations to form a-sinuous and contiguous configuration of uniform cross section.

S. Anfall structure for a railway car comprising a plurality of metallic plates secured together along vertical lines, each plate havinfrv a plurality oit major and n'iinor Vertical corrugations terminating Within the plate, said major corrugations being parallel, contiguous, symmetrical and Widest adjacent one of their ends' and diminishing in Width toward Atheir ends, said minor lcorrugations positioned between said'm'ajor corrugations merging from the plane of the plate, and increasingr in depth and'width until they merge with-said major corrugations to 'form a continuous configuration ot'uniiorm cross section.

9. A Wallstructure for a lrailway car comprisin a plurality of metallicplates secured together along' vertical lines, each plate havinga plurality ot major and `minor vertical eorrugations terminating Within the plate,

said major corrugations descreasingl in ,Width from adjacent one 'of their endstoward their ends, said minor corrugations positioned between `the major corrugations merging Jfrom the plane of the plate, and increasing in depth and Width until they merge With the major eerrugrations to form a contiguous congurathemajor corrugljations. y

tion or" uniform cross section.- Y l0. A. metallic plate Wall structure pro- .vided.with a plurality elf-major Verticaleorrugrations spaced apart distances equal `to their Width which decrease in Width toward their ends. and a plurality of minor Vertical corrugations lyingbetween said major corrun'ations which increase in Width toward the edges of the plate until said major and minor corrunations are spaced apart distances equal to .their width, the maxnnum strength of the corrugated Wall being` below the n'iiddle er 1p1. A metallic plate Wall structure proa line midway between the outermost portions ot Ythe corrugations, the maximum strength of the corrugated Wall beingbeloiv the middle ot' the maj or corrugations.

l2. A Wall tor a railway car comprising a metallic plate secured to oppositely disposed horizontal trame members oi the car, said plate proyidedivith aplurality or Vertical major 'corrugat-ions Which decrease in Width toward their ends, said major corrugations haxf'in-,e their maximum lWidth adjacent the lower trame member, each plate also provided with a plurality et minor corrugations lj, ,n between said major corrugations, which increase in width toward theedges ot the plate until the major and minor corrugations terminate in the plate adjacent said onpositely disposed traine members and in line with each other. l

13. il Wall iter a railwaycar-comprising a metallic plate secured to oppositely disposed horizontal frame members ot the can said plate provided With a plurality otyertical major corrugations which decrease in Width toward their ends, said maior corrugations having' 'their maximumV Width adjacent the lower frame member, each plate also provided .rith a plurality ot minor corrugations lying between said major corrugations, which increase in Width and in depth toward the e lgjes of the plate until the major and minor corrugatiens terminate in the plate adjacent said oppositely disposed trame members and in line with each other.

M ;A Wall for arailway car comprisingy a metallic plate secured to oppositelydisposed horizontaltrame members ot the car, said plate provided with a plurality of vertical. major corrugations spaced apartpdistances substantialljf.VY equal to their width Vvwhich decrease in width toward their ends Where they members.y said -major 'coi'rurations haring substantially equal to their' width which decrease in width toward their ends where they merge into the `plate adjacent said trame members, said major corrugations having their maximum width adjacent the lower frame member, each plate also provided with a plurality of minor corrugations'lying between said major Ycorrugations which increase in width and in depth toward the edges of the plate until the major and minor corruga tions are spaced apart distances equal to their width adjacent said oppositely disposed frame members.

16. A wall for railway car comprising a metallic plate secured to oppositely disposed horizontal frame members of the car, said plate provided with a plurality of vertical major corrugations symmetrical in cross section 'about a line midway between the outer-A most portions of the major corrugations which decrease in width toward their ends where they merge into the plate adjacent said frame members, said major corrugations having their maximum width adjacent the lower trame member, each plate also provided with a plurality of minor corrugations lying between. said major corrugations which increase in width until the major and minor corrugations form a cross section symmetrical about a line midway between the outermost portions of the corrugations adjacent said oppositely disposed frame members.

17. A wall for a railway car comprising a `metallic plate secured to oppositely disposed horizontal frame members of Vthe car, said plate provided with .a plurality of vertical major corrugations symmetrical in cross sec tion about a line midway between the outermost portions of the major corrugations which decrease in width toward their ends where they merge into the plate adjacent said frame members, said major corrugations having their' maximum width adjacent the lower frame member, each plate also provided with a plurality of Vminor corrugations lying between said major corrugations which increase in width and in depth until the major and minor corrugations form a cross section symmetrical about a line mid? way between the outermost portions of the corrugations adjacent said oppositely dis-V posed frame members.

18. A wall for a railway car comprising a metallic plate secured to oppositely disposed horizontal trame members of the car, said plate provided with a plurality 01": vertical truncated maj or corrugations which decrease in width toward their ends where they merge into the plate adjacent said trame members, said major corrugations having their maximum width adjacent the lower frame member, each plate also provided with a plurality of minor corrugations lying between said major corrugations which increase in width until the major and minor corrugations are contiguous and form a sinuous configuration adjacent said oppositely disposed frame members.

19. A wall Jor a railway car comprising a metallic plate secured to oppositely disposed horizontal frame members of the car, said plate provided with a plurality of vert-ical truncated major corrugations which decrease in width toward their ends ywhere they merge into the plate adjacent saidframe members, said major corrugations having their maximuml width adj acentv the lower frame member, each plate also provided with a plurality of minor corrugations lying between said major corrugations which increase in width and in depth until the maj or and minor corrugations are contiguous and form a sinuous configuration adjacent said oppositely disposed frame members. n

20. A wall for a railway car comprising a metallic plate secured to oppositely disposed horizontal frame members of the car, said plate provided with a plurality of vertical major corrugations spaced apart distances substantially equal to their width symmetrical in cross section about a line midway between the outermost portions of the major corrugations which decrease in width toward their ends where they merge into the plate adjacent said frame members, said major corrugations having their maximum width adjacent the lower frame member, each plate also provided with a plurality of minor corrugations lying between said major corrugations which increase in width toward the edges of the plate until the major and minor corrugations are spaced apart distances equal to their width and form a cross section symmetrical about a line midway between the outermost portions of the corrugations adjacent said oppositely disposed frame members.

21. A metallic structure for a railway ear, comprising a metallic plate secured to oppositely disposed frame members of the structure, said plate provided with a plurality of constant depth vertical major corrugations with substantially flat apices with the parts of the plate between the major corrugations also substantially flat, said plate also provided with a plurality of minor corrugations lying substantially between the major corrugations which terminate into the plate adjae cent said frame members, substantially in alinement with said major corrugations, where the said major and minor corrugations have arcuate apices and the parts of the plate between the ends of the major and minor corrugations are also et arcuate conliguration.

22. A wall structure for a railway car comprising a metallic plate secured to upper and lower frame members of the car provided.

major corrugations and a pair of alined vary- Vlving widthfvertical minor corrugations positioned between adjacent major corrugations,

'the maximum strength of the corrugated wall Vbeing nearer said lower frame member than said upper frame member.

23. A metallic plate provided with a plurality of varying width vertical major corrugationsand a pair of alined varying width vertical minor corrugations positioned between adjacent major corrugations, the maximumv strength of the corrugated wall being below the middle of the corrugated portion of the plate.

24. A metallic plate provided with a pluf rality of varying width vertical major corrugatione and a pair of alined yvarying width vertical minor corrugations positioned be= tween adjacent major corrugations, having the upper minor corrugations longer than the lower minor Corruga'tions, the maximum strength ot' the corrugittedV wall being' below the middle of the corrugated portion of the date, i'

l ARTHUR E. SMALL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7066529 *Dec 1, 2003Jun 27, 2006Hyundai TransleadCargo carrying container with peripheral wall structure incorporating a corrugated sheet
Classifications
U.S. Classification105/410
International ClassificationB61D17/04, B61D17/08
Cooperative ClassificationB61D17/08
European ClassificationB61D17/08