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Publication numberUS1682179 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 28, 1928
Filing dateMay 20, 1927
Publication numberUS 1682179 A, US 1682179A, US-A-1682179, US1682179 A, US1682179A
InventorsOttmar M. Krembs
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container
US 1682179 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

o. M. KREMBs commun Filed lay 2Q; 19 4 Shoots-Sheet 1 y ya; trail;

O. M. KREMBSV CONTAINER Aug. 28, 1928. 1,682,179

Filed Ilay 20, 1927 4 Shoots-Shut.- 2

Aug. 2s, lsza 1382,119

Q. M. KREMBS coN'rAIu.Bi'-'R Filed Hay 20. 1927 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 llllllNillllHlg lfhll lillllllllllll 4, WM5. f Mg Aug. 2s, 192s. '1,682,179

C. M. KREMBS con'umnn Filed lay 20. 1927 4 Shoots-Shoot 4 Patented Aug. 28, 1928.

OTTMAB. M KREMBs or CHICAGO, rnLiNoIs.

GQNTAINER.

Application led May 20, 1927. Serial No. 192,934.

This invention relates to a container of fibre or the like, and to a method to be used in packing, shipping and handling vmetal products,

such as welding rods, forexample, which haveV heretofore required shipping cases of Wood or other strong and expensive shipping wrappings. y

One of the objects of the invention is to produce a packing container which shall be relatively light in weight and yet be su'Hiciently strong to withstand rough handling; which will be as cheap as possible; which will be easy to use in packing; which will be available for use as a container for the goods af.-

5 ter the shipment reaches its destination, and from which the welding rods or other articles may be readily removed, as required; and` protrude, and sometimes the rods are damaged or lost. Such cartons are of no value as containers for handling the rods `for sale or for use after reaching destination. Cartons or boxes of wood, While more or less durable, are unduly expensive and increase freight charges on account of their weight. Moreover, after receipt at destination, wooden boxes are not useful as dust-proof containers and do not preserve the coated or uncoated welding rods from the effects of atmospheric changes. Y

By the present invention, I have obviated the foregoing and other objections; the invention consisting in the means for packing,

shipping and handling coated and uncoated vention, may be made.

Figure 2 is aperspective view of the blankfolded in carton form, with the ends open.

Figure 3 is a vertical sectional View of the carton with one end closed and the other open.

welding rods and other metalv products, as herein illustrated, described and pointed outV 0fA a blank from' Figure 4. is a similar view, with rods packed and the carton closed, and protectingblock applied to each end.

Figure 5 is an elevation showing the packed carton and baling strip applied, ready for shipment.

Figure 6 is a plan view of one end of the package shown in Figure 5, on an enlarged scale.

F igure? is a longitudinal sectional View of one end of the same package, also enlarged, the section being taken in the plane of the dotted line 7 7 of Figure 6.

Figure 8 is aview in elevation, of a modified form of package, partially broken away-to show the modiiicationin section.

. Y Figures 9, 10, 11 and 12 are views in per-.-

spective showing some modified .forms of theV protecting blocks used.

Figure 13 isaperspective View, enlarged,-

of a modified form of package cap or cover.

. Figure 14- is a view in perspective, of a package board which may beemployed in practicing the invention.

` Figure 15 is a view in elevation, of a` package, .partially broken away to show the rods in place in the board illustrated in Figure 14. Figure 16 is a transverse, sectional view vof the same, the section being taken in the plane ofthe horizontal line 16-16 of Figure 15. Figure 17 is a perspective view of a modification. Figure 18 is a transverse, `sectional view taken on the line 1S-18`of Figure 17.

Figures 19 and 2O are plan and perspective views, respectively, of details.

In` practicing my invention, I prefer to make the container of paper, fibre or other foldable orl relativelyv strong material, in the form of the blank A,shown in Fig. 1; This blank is preferably scored as indicated at 1 and slit asat 2 to form end iaps 3, and prefi be longitudinally scored at 7. The scoring referr'ed to isnot essential; it-being sufiicient if the container material Yis capablev of #being foldedclosely about .the articles to be packed so as to engage the sides and ends thereof.

yerably also notched at two-of its edges, as?! The container B may be formed by bending the blank A along the longitudinal score lines.

1 into the tubular, four sided package shown in Figure 2,V the fiap being secured .to coverv the marginl 8, by r'nucilagey or other suitable 9. A similar, second lining plate is placed uponthe top vends ofthe Welding rods, the flaps 3, 3 at the open end of the package are then folded over in superposed relation to close the package as shown in Figure 4.

11 and 12 are blocks used upon the top and l bottom respectively, of the package B. They are of Wood and sufficiently thick to protect the-package during shipment. These blocks are not initially connected to the container A, but are loose and adapted to be placed closely against the ends of the metal product, regardless of the length of said product. They may be used either with or Without lining plates 10 andV 11. It is important to note that these blocks 11 and 12 are not originally connected With the Ycontainer material A, because if so connected, the container would be of a predetermined lengthnot adaptable to Welding rods of different lengths, and the blocks 11 and 12 Would not be capable of closely engaging the ends of the rods or of being drawn toward each other in the inishing of the packing operation.

Baling `strips 13,14, preferably .of flat, thin metal, are then placed around the ends and sides of the `package and one or more' similar strips 15 are then placed around the package outside the strips 13, 14, as clearly shown in Figures 5, 6 and-7. 'Ihese strips 13 and 14 are secured by brads or nails 16 driven into the shippingblocks 11 and 12.y

The package is now ready for shipment. The thin packing or lining plates 9 and 10 act to prevent the ends of the rods C from indenting or breaking the folded flaps 3 and prevent injury to the rod ends; The thick end blocks 11A and -12 take all undue end thrust. The package and the bundle of rods are securely bound into a unitary structure for shipping, Without the possibility of the rods shifting during shipment or handling in transit, and to these results the end protective blocks 11 and 12 largely contribute.

In the modification shown` in Figures 8 and 12, it will be noted that flatbaling strips 13,

14 and 15 are omitted and Wire strips 17 and' 18 are similarly used longitudinally of the container Band about the protective blocks 11 and 12. These Wires may be secured by staples 19. The flat transverse strip 15 is also omitted and one or more binding Wires h 20 are used, the ends of each Wire being twisted or otherwise secured together as. indicated at 21. The carton D, in this instance, Will be made from a blank similar to that shown in Figure 1, With the score lines 1, 1 and the four top flaps 3, 3 omitted, and the 'blank folded into tubularform as shown in Figures 8 and 9. The body of the round carton D is provided on its top end with an ordinary, removable cup shaped cap 22 which not only surrounds tlie top portion of the body but closes its open end. Usually the Wall of the top portion of the carton body D Will be of reduced thickness to provide an annular circumferential shoulder 23 against which the edge of the cap 22 rests, thus making the exterior surface of the cap flush with the outer surface of the carton D. And it Will be further noted that the body of the carton D will be shorter than the length of the Welding rods C, C, so that the top ends 24 of the latter Will project above the margin 25 of the carton D, which arrangement provides easy access to the rods and Wtihrdrawal 0f one or more for sale or yfor use when the cap 22 is removed. 4The carton D, being shorter than the rods C, permits the cap 22 to be seated so as to engage the ends of the rods C, and consequently the endblocks 11 and 12 may closely engage the ends ofsaidcovered rods, as heretofore explained. It Will of course be understood that the use of the cap 22 excludes dust and dirt forni the carton and excludes moisture and other deteriorating agencies therefrom.

I may notch or channel the outer faces of the blocks 11 and 12 as shown at 26 in Figure 9, so that the liat strips14 Will lie'in the channels iiush With the surface of the blocks and have no projecting edges to catch, or I may overlap the edges of the strips 14 and secure them to the blocks by a plurality of short nails 27 or tacks, as shown in Figure 11.

Vihere the block 11 is inclosed Within the cap 22 as indicated in dotted lines 28 in Figure 13, I prefer to stamp out or otherwise form on the cap 22 a pair of loops 29 and to lace the ends of the fiat strips 14 therethrough. The ends of the strips 14 Will be secured Vby nails or tacks 29 driven through the flat strip, the cap 22 and into the block 1'1, as shown in Figures 1,1 and 13.

I may also notch the top and bottom blocks 11 and 12 sufficiently to receive the Wires 17 and 18 and may tie or unite the Wires by v One arrangement for sodoing is illusprovided with a plurality of shaped, flat metal bands 33 suitably secured at their ends to the side margins of the board 32, as indicated at 34. v

The rods C are held upon the ,boardl 32 in non-shifting relation by thebands 33 rand the bundle of rods and boardvplaced, as a unit, within the shipping carton E, having four sides, 35, 36, 37 and 38, and two ends 3,9, 39. The carton E is provided interiorly at top and bottom with wooden blocks 40 ot' sufficient thickness to withstand rough usage in transit. The blocks 40, it will be understood, are positioned intermediate the ends 39 and the ends ot the rods C and also contact with the end margins 41 of the board 32. The side 35 of the carton E is secured by tacks 42 to the side edge 43 of the board 32, as isralso the side 38 by tacks 44, The ends 39 are tacked to the interior blocks 40 by brads or tacks 45, some of the latter being sufficiently long to pass through the blocks 40 and imite it to the board 32, as indicated at 46.

When the carton D is rectangular in cross section and the removable cap 22 is of the but vtransversely of the strip 47. The strips 47 and 49 will be provided with pressed up loops 50. similar to the loops 29 of Figure 13, and bale strips 13, 14, positioned as shown in Figure 17, are laced through the loops 50. The transverse hailing strips 15 join the ends ofthe strips 47 and 49 by being passed around the package and throughthe end loops 51, 52, as clearly shown in Figure 17, and draw the end: blocks 11 and 12 closely against thegends of the rods or other articles to be packed.

In some instances, it may be desirable to further protect the corners'oi the cap 22 by thin strips of sheet metal 53, which, being angular, may be positioned to cover the corners and extend on two adjacent sides of the cap and be held in position by the overlying margins of the strips 47 and 49 as indicated by the dotted lines 54.

It will be understood of course that the body of the carton or package is of relatively thin material, and if of paper or fibre, may have a plain or iiuted surface.

It will be seen from the foregoing description that the package and its contents are securely bound together and capable of withstanding rou gh usage in transit. Itwill also be understood that after arrival at destination, the package having been opened and part of the contents removed, the package ina-y be readilyclosed so as to remain subprotecting blocks at each end of the package,

binding means extending longitudinally and across the ends, whereby the end blocks are drawn toward cach other and against the ends ot' the merchandise to be packed, and a circumterentially arranged Vtie strip, where'- by a solid, unitary structure of contents is produced.

2. A carton of iibre or other relativelyY thin Y package and chandise :to be shipped and the inner surfaces ofthe carton ends.

3. A container for the shimentof heavy i merchandise, comprising a ture of paper or similar relatively fragile ma terial and of a predetermined size to be substantially completely Filled when the iner-y chandise to be handled is inserted therein, aV

chandise therein into one solid, compact shipping package.

` 4. A container for the shipment of'heavy merchandise, comprising ay box like structure of paper or similar relatively fragile ymaterial and of a predetermined size to be substantially completely-filled when Vthe merchandise to be handled is inserted therein, a movable relatively thick block of wood'at each end of the ox like s truclll) container, a binding strip extending longitudinally over the container body and over the f two end blocks, a second binding strip similarly positioned but crossing the first binding strip over the blocks, whereby the end blocks are drawn toward each other and against'the ends of the merchandise to ber packed, means for securinglthe strips to the wood blocks, a third strip extending transversely about the container body and over both of the other binding strips to bind the end blocks, the container and the merchandise therein into one solid, compact shipping package, and a relatively thin wood filler insert within the container between the merchandise and each end of the container. y Y

5. A container for the shipment of heavy merchandise, comprising a' box like structure of paper or similar relatively fragile material and of a predetermined size to be substantially completely filled when the merchandise to be handled is inserted therein, aV movable relativelyv thick block of wood at each end of the container', a binding strip extending longitudinally over the container body and over the two end blocks, a second binding strip similarly positioned but crossing the first binding strip over the blocks, whereby the end blocks are drawn toward each other and against the ends of the merchandise to be packed,

means for securing the strips to the wood blocks, and a third strip `extending transversely about the container body and over both of the other binding strips to bind ther end blocks, the container and the merchandise therein into one solid, compact shipping package, and a relatively thin wood'filler in,- sert within the container between the merchandise and each end of the container, the container having removable cap at one end.

6. vA container for the shipment of heavy merchandise, comprising a box like structure of paper or similar relatively fragile material and of a predetermined size to be substantially completely filled when the merchandise to be handled is inserted therein, a movable relatively thick block of wood at each end of the container, a binding strip extending longitudinally over the container body and over the two end blocks, a second binding strip y similarly positioned but crossing the rst binding strip over the blocks, whereby the end blocks are drawn toward each other and against the ends of the merchandise to be packed, means. for securing the strips tothe 5:" l wood blocks, and a third strip extendingtransversely about the container body and over both of the other binding strips to bind the end blocks, the container and the merchandise therein into one solid, compact shipping package, the bloc-ks of wood at the ends being provided with crossed recesses to re- 'having slots cut thereinto provide looped portions, and a plurality of longitudinally and transversely extending ties passed through said looped portions of the bands and around the sides and ends of the container, whereby the end blocks are drawn toward each other, to, form the merchandise and packing into a unitary structure.

8. A method of packing relatively heavy merchandise, which consists in enclosing the merchandise in a wrapping of relatively light foldable material, arranging a pair of end blocks closely against the ends thereof, drawing the end blocks toward each other by means of longitudinal ties, and forming the merchandise and packing into a unitary structure by longitudinally and transversely extending ties. v

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my invention I alfx my signature this 17th day of May, 1927.

OTTMAR M. KREMBS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2426797 *Sep 3, 1943Sep 2, 1947Joseph P SteinLiquidproof container
US3913827 *Jan 17, 1974Oct 21, 1975Us Postal ServiceShipping container for mail cartons
US4497407 *Apr 16, 1984Feb 5, 1985Stager Daniel JWelding rod package
US4589550 *Jan 24, 1985May 20, 1986Stager Daniel JWelding rod package
US7780004 *Sep 6, 2005Aug 24, 2010Lincoln Global, Inc.Package for stick electrodes
US8397913Sep 27, 2010Mar 19, 2013Lincoln Global, Inc.Shipping package with end retainer and method therefor
US8616426Aug 16, 2010Dec 31, 2013Lincoln Global, Inc.Holster for stick electrodes
US9022241 *May 26, 2011May 5, 2015Lincoln Global, Inc.Stackable container
US20110220530 *Sep 15, 2011Lincoln Global, Inc.Stackable container
DE3930336A1 *Sep 11, 1989Mar 21, 1991Oerlikon Buehrle SchweisstechContainer for preserving welding electrodes - contains material which has greater moisture absorption potential than that of material coating electrodes
WO2012042342A1 *Sep 27, 2011Apr 5, 2012Lincoln Global, Inc.Shipping package with end retainer and method therefor
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/443, 229/125.37, 229/199
International ClassificationB65D59/00, B65D71/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D59/00, B65D71/02
European ClassificationB65D59/00, B65D71/02