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Publication numberUS1683992 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1928
Filing dateMay 24, 1926
Priority dateMay 24, 1926
Publication numberUS 1683992 A, US 1683992A, US-A-1683992, US1683992 A, US1683992A
InventorsLester Schon, Shoenberg Milton H
Original AssigneeShoenberg
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Circuit interrupter and socket
US 1683992 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 11, 1928. 1,683,992

M. H. SHOENBERG ET AL CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER AND SOCKET Filed May 24, 1926 INVEII T088 MIL T0/V H. SHOENBERG A TTORIEYS Patented Sept. 11, 1928.

UNITED STATES PATENT oFi-"ica,

MILTON H. SHOENBERG AND LESTER SCHON, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA; SAID SCHON ASSIGNOR TO SAID SHOENBERG.

CIRCUIT i INTERRUPTER AND SOCKET.

Application filed May 24,

This invention relates generally to devices for periodically varying the current in a lighting circuit.

In lighting circuits which employ a 011- ciiit interrupter it is often desirable to provide a switch for either causing one or more lamps to burn steadily or to flash periodically. In prior arrangements it was necessary to provide a separate manually controlled switch which of course required special connections with the circuit.

It is an object of this invention to devise a combined circuit interrupter and switch whereby the intei'rupter contact may be either operatively connected in series with the circuit or may be shunted out or made ineffective.

It is a further object of this invention to devise a novel arrangement for incorporating a circuit interrupter in combination with a lamp socket.

It is a further object of this invention to incorporate a switching device in a combined lamp socket and circuit interrupter whereby upon rotation of the light the interrupter element may be either operatively connected in the circuit or shunted out as desired.

Further objects of this invention will appear from the following description in which we have set forth the preferred embodiment of our invention. It is to be undei'stood that the scope of this invention is to be determined from the appended claims and the state of the prior art.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a cross sectional elevation showing the device as constructed in accordance with this invention.

Figs 2 and 3 are top and bottom plan views respectively of the interrupter element and its mounting.

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view takenalong the line 4-4 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a circuit diagram showing the manner in which this interrupter and the lighting socket are connected to a source of current. 1

The device comprises generally a lamp socket orv receptacle which is combined with a suitable form of circuit interrupter, the circuit interrupter being preferably mounted within the hollow socket casing. Thus as shown in Fig. 1, there is provided a lamp socket comprising a hollow body portion 1926. Serial No. 111,119.

10 and cap 11 forming a hollow casing and constructed of suitable insulating material such as a phenolic condensate product. Secured to the lower portion of the body 10 is an internally threaded metal sleeve 12 which is adapted to receive a threaded connection plug or a lamp base 13. The cap 11 may be removably secured to the body portion as by means of screws 14.

Mounted within the interior of the socket and above the sleeve 12 there is a circuit interrupter element 15, preferably of the type shown in our copending application No. 133,130, filed Sept. 2, 1926. Such an interrupter comprises a metal. plate in the form of a disc 16 upon which is mounted a bimetallic element 17. The movable end of this element carries a contact 18 which is grounded to the disc 16, this contact co-opcrating with an insulated contact 19. This insulated contact is carried by a spring metal strip 20, one end of which forms a spring contact stri 21 which is sprung away from the lower face of the disc 16, A heating resistance 22 is suitably positioned upon the bimetallic element and is preferably connected in shunt with the contacts. A sheet of insulating material 23 is inserted between the strip 21 and the disc, and an eyelet 24 is employed for securing strip 21 to the disc, the eyelet being suitably insulated from the metal disc. As shown in Figs. 2 and 3 the bimetallic element 17 is adapted to operate within a recess or slot 25 in the disc 16 and is offset from the center of the disc so that tlhe spring 21 may extend centrally of the i isc.

For securing the interrupter within the socket a recess 26 is provided in the upper end of the body portion whereby the edge of the disc may be clamped between the body 10 and the cap 11. Struck out projections 27 may be provided on the disc for interlocking with the body portion, thus prevfilltll'lg rotationof the disc. When thus supported the contact strip 21 extends in a position to engage the central contact 28 of the lamp base 13. The end of the contact strip 21 is extended beyond the edge of the insulating sheet 23 and is provided with an inturned portion 29 which is adapted to make electrical contact with the lower face of the disc when pressed upwardly.

The circuit interrupter is electrically connected as shown in Fig. 5. One supply line 1 is grounded to the disc 16 while the other line 2 is connected to the socket sleeve 1?. When the central lamp base contact is screwed in sufiiciently far to simply contact with the spring 21 then the circuit inter rupter will be connected in serieswith the lamp and will cause the lamp to light periodically. l/Vhen it is desired to burnthe lamp steadily it is screwed more tightly lnto the socket to bring the portion 29 into electrical contact with the lower face of the disc, thus shunting out the interrupter contacts.

We claim:

1. A device of the class described com prising an electrical socket, a circuit interrupter. mounted within said socket for re peatedly varying current supplied to the same, and switch means incorporated with said circuit interrupter for shunting out said circuit interrupter.

2. A device of the class described comprising an electrical socket adapted to receive a light base, a circuit interrupter associated with said socket for repeatedly varying current supplied to the same; and switch means operable upon rotation of said light base to shunt out said circuit interrupter.

3. A device of the class described comprising an electrical socket having a hollow casing, a plate disposed within said casing, a circuit interrupter mounted on said plate,

a spring contact mounted on the underside of said plate for contacting with the central contact of a light base, said first mentioned contact forming one of the terminals for said circuit interrupter and being adapted to be forced upward by rotation of the light base to shunt out the circuit interrupter.

4. A combined socket and circuit interrupter comprising a hollow casing, a threaded metal sleeve dlsposed in the lower end of the casing for receiving a light base, a plate mounted within said casing above said sleeve, a spring contact disposed below said plate and insulated from the same, a circuit interrupter having contacts connected in series with a source of current and in shunt with said plate and spring contact, whereby a light inserted in said socket will contact with said spring contact to be operatively connected to a. source of current in series with the interrupter contacts, further insertion of said light causing the spring contact to touch the plate and shunt out the circuit interrupter.

5. A combined socket and circuit interrupter comprising a hollow casing, a threaded sleeve disposed in the lower end of the casing for receiving a light base, a metal disc disposed within said casing above said sleeve, a circuit interrupter mounted on said disc and offset from the center of the same, a spring strip mounted on the underside of said disc and insulated from the same, the end of said strip being adapted to be contacted by a lamp base inserted in the sleeve, said disc and strip forming the two terminals for the circuit interrupter, means for connecting a supply of current to said disc and sleeve whereby a. light inserted in the sleeve will be connected in series with the interrupter element but may be further inserted to force the spring strip into contact wfth the disc to shunt out the circuit interrupter.

6. In a device of the class described, an electrical socket having a casing, an interrupter elelnent mounted on said casing for repeatedly varying current supplied by the socket, and switch means operable upon rotation of a light inserted in the socket for shunting said interrupter element.

7. In a device of the class described, an electrical socket including a casing, a threaded metal sleeve contact for engaging a lamp base, and a central contact; an interrupter element inserted in series with said contact for repeatedly varying current supplied to a lamp inserted in the socket, and switch means associated with the central contact for shunting the interrupter element upon rotation of the light.

8. A device of the class .described comprising an electrical socket adapted to be connected to current supply lines, a circuit interrupter cooperably associated with the socket and said supply lines for repeatedly varying current supplied by the socket. and switch means mounted on the socket for effecting continuous supplying of current to the socket and serving as a means for rendering said circuit interrupter inoperative.

9. In a device of the class described, an electrical socket, a circuit interrupter cooperably associated with said socket to recurrently vary current supplied by the socket, and switch means cooperably associated with the socket and adapted to be opened and closed bymovement of a lamp base inserted in the socket, said switch in one position thereof serving to render said circuit interrupter inoperable to interrupt current supplied by the socket whereby the lamp may be burned steadily.

In testimony whereof, we have hereunto set our hands.

MILTON H. SHOENBERG. LESTER SCHON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2458724 *Jan 4, 1946Jan 11, 1949Parissi Anthony JIncandescent lamp socket
US3058032 *Jun 1, 1960Oct 9, 1962Quintin C TeichCombination switch and lighting element
US4131868 *Mar 7, 1977Dec 26, 1978Gte Sylvania IncorporatedIncandescent lamp socket having overtemperature protector
US4314223 *Dec 11, 1980Feb 2, 1982Mcgraw-Edison CompanyThermal protective device for lighting fixtures
US4396898 *Mar 26, 1982Aug 2, 1983Gte Products CorporationLampholder having thermal protector
US4751623 *Oct 27, 1986Jun 14, 1988Novo Products, Inc.Heat deactivated illumination device
US20120322323 *Jun 15, 2012Dec 20, 2012Optilume Ltd.Electrical connection means
Classifications
U.S. Classification337/92, 315/209.00R, 439/667, 337/113, 337/85
International ClassificationH01H61/00, H01H61/06
Cooperative ClassificationH01H61/063
European ClassificationH01H61/06B