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Publication numberUS1684370 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 11, 1928
Filing dateSep 18, 1925
Publication numberUS 1684370 A, US 1684370A, US-A-1684370, US1684370 A, US1684370A
InventorsKarl R. Schuster
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Art of transporting mixed materials
US 1684370 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 11, 1928.

K. R. SCHUSTER ART OF TRANSPORTING MIXED MATERIALS 7 Filed Sept. 18, 1925 Patented Sept. 11, 1928 UNITED STATES KARL R. SGHUSTER, OF HOPATGONG, NEW JERSEY.

ART OF TRANSPORTING MIXED MATERIALS.

Application filed September This inventionpertains to the art of transporting mixed materials, such as a concretemixture for building purposes, where-1' by the materials may be mixed at a plant or station and transported to a distant point or station for utilization at the latter station in building operations of one kind or another. i

The transportation of themixd materials is effected primarily by thev power of a pump, but the e'fiiciency of a pump ofa type appropriate for handling a concrete mixture is dependent, in large measure, upon keeping said pumping mechanism in a primed condition with the mixed materiall According to one embodiment of the invention, the pump is primed by utilizing the pressure of air or gas employed to agitate and mix the components of the mixture, and to this end, such air or gas is retained under pressure within the mixing chamber and such retained pressure of the mixing agent is utilized to dislodge or to eject the mixture through the mixture outlet, and to feed such mixture to the pump, for-priming the latter, and maintaining such pump in a primed condition. I

It is not essential that the admixture of the component materials be effected by the agency of air or gas under pressure, for the reason that such admixture of the materials may be obtained by a mechanical mixing machine. To. rapidly mix the components and economically transport the same it is desirable,however, to blow air or gas under pressure into contact with the com onent materials while the latter are confinec with in a substantially closed chamber, whereby the sand, cement andiwater of a concrete mixture is diffused within a mass of coarse mineral aggregate, and thus efiect the desired mix of such concrete mass. It requires a brief time to mix such a charge of concrcte, and the air or gas may be at any pressure suitable for thepurpose; but the mix having taken place, the air or gasfis retained within the closed chamber until the mixture outlet'is opened by the movement of a discharge valve,jwhereby the pressure of such retained air or gas is utilized to dislodge the mixed mass and to feed the same to the pumping mechanism, as a result of which air or gas pressure is utilized for procedure.

1a, 1925. serial No. 57,238".

priming the pump and thus efficiency is at tained in the operation of the pump and economy and speed is attained in the transportation of the mixed materials. I

In one practical embodiment of the in vention, it is embodied in an apparatus comprising a chamber wherein the admixture of the components is conducted to produce a charge and concurrently with such admixture within the chamber, the components for a second charge of concrete is accumulated within a second chamber, the inletto and the outlet fromwhich second chamber are controllable separately and by independent gates or valves. Followin the discharge of the mixed mass from the rstchamber into a conduit leading to the pumping mechanism, the outlet valve of said first chamber is closed, and thereafter the accumulated charge within the second chamber is deposited within the first chamber by opening the outlet'valveffrom the second chamber while keeping closed the inlet valve ,to said second chamber, whereby the second chamber serves the functionof an air lock to the first chamber by preventing the outflow of air or gas from the first chamber during the period of time required to mix the components within said first chamber and to discharge to the first chamber the compo nents of the second charge accumulated within the second chamber, as a result of which economy is obtained in the use of air or gas.

Other functions and advantages of the invention will appear from the following description taken in connection with the drawings, wherein different embodiments of my apparatus'a're disclosed, and wherein Figure l is a diagrammatic view partly in elevation and partly in section of one form of apparatus for transporting mixed materials.

Figure 2 is a similar view of another form ofrnixer illustrating, a further step in the "Figures 3 and 4 are similar'views of other forms of apparatus for transporting mixed materials embodyin gthe invention.

In Figures 1, 2 and '3, the admixture of the components of a massis effected primarily by the pressure of, air or gas in contact with such components while present within s a closed chamber, whereas-in Figure 4 the such mixed mass from the vessel and to feed such mixed. mass. to the intake of the pump ing mechanism,

The pump is or may be of any character suitable for the purpose, but one form suit-.

able for transporting a mixed mass is a centrifugal pump such as shown in Figures [1,3 and 4; the intake to which is connected with the vessel A in order that the mixed mass may be forced by air or gas pressure into the pumpfor priming the latter. This pump may be positioned in a distant relation to the mixer, as in Figure 1, or it may be in a close relation to the mixer as in Figures 2 and 4, but in some instances, as where the mixer is closely adjacent to the placeof utilization of the mixed materials,

- I may omit the pump, and utilize the pres sure of air or gas for transporting the mixed mass within the conduit Cso as to transport the mass from the mixer to the place of use solely by air or gas pressure.

In Figure 1 there is shown a hopper- I shaped vessel A of suitable form and dimensions. The bottom part a of this. vessel is of ta ering formation for discharging the mixec, mass through a port b,.with which communicates a branch 0 of an eduction pipe or conduit C. The exit or port 6, is closed by a gate or valve B adapted, when opened, to be turned byvanysuitable means (not shown) in a way for the gate tocbe substantially out of the line of flow of the mixed mass.

The vessel is shown as being provided in-' teriorly with a partition 03, constituting a hopper or chamber D within the upper part .of said vessel. The chamber D is of such 'form and dimensions. as to contain a quantity of'materials adapted to be accumulated therein for the production of a charge of materials, and this chamber. D-is withinthe limits of the vessel A, so that the accumulated materials, or the charge, may be delivered from the accumulating chamber D directly into the mixing chamber A of hopper A. The partition cl is of frusto-conical formation, with an opening 0 at the bottom;-

of chamber D, and this opening 6 is adapted to be closed by agate or valve E, shown as a sliding gate operableby a hand rod 6. The inclined upper part a of vessel A constitutes the top of the chamber D,

andsaid top part of the vessel A and of the chamber D is provided with a tapering mouth portion f, the latter being closed by a gate or valve F, shown also as a sliding valve operable by a hand rod f.v

The agitation of the materials within the mixing chamber A is eiiected by the energy of air or gas under pressure. Such air or gas is supplied to vessel A by a pipe G, hav' ing a reduced section g coupled to the bottom of vessel A. In this instance, the pipe with its reduced section 9 constitutes an air blast means, or said pipe may be provided,

or formed, obviously, with a blast nozzle.

As shown, the reduced pipe, or its blast nozzle, is POSllJlOIlGClTOI teeding air or gas under pressure within the vmass of materials present within the chamber A, such inflow of air or gas being into the materials and above the mixture outlet 5. The inflow of the agitating fluid is controlled by a cook or valve 9, provided at a suitable point in the feed pipe G.

The eduction pipe C is of a desired length and diameter for conducting the mixed mass from the vessel to the place at which the mixture is to be installed or used. In the apparatus of Figure 1, the semi-plastic mass is transported within the conduit C, by the combined action of suction and pressure, the suction being exerted forwardly of the moving mass, whereas the pressure is ap plied rearwardly of such mass. The pressure impelling medium may be a suitable gas or atmospheric air, supplied by a pressure pipe I-I, coupled to the eduction pipe C ata point in axial alinement therewith, and if desired a valve or cook (not shown), may be provided in said pipe H. The suction or partial vacuum in the conduit C is due to, the action of pump I, the intake of which is connected to the eduction pipe C, and from the outlet of this pump leads a distributing pipe 71, of any suitable nature, by which the concrete mass may be installed or placed or otherwise disposed of for utilization in accordance with the practice of the trade. r i p The chamber D within which the materials certain stage in the service of the apparatus to have communication with the mixing chamber A so that the fluid pressure supplied for agitating purposes to chamber A is free to pass from the mixing chamber into an airlock chamber D, thus accumulating the fluid pressure within said air lock chamber, and thus enabling such accumulated fluid pressureto be utilized for effecting the expulsion of the mixture from the mixing chamber A, and also for clear ing out of the chamber D (air lock chamber) any materials which may tend to lodge upon the surfaces within the chamber.

J is a by-pass for the fluidpressure. the

intake of said by-pass being connected with the mixing chamber A and the outlet connected to the accumulating (air-lock) cham ber D. In this by-pass is a manually controlled valve j, adapted to be closed at will.

As shown, the by-pass is arranged exteriorly of the vessel A; but this arrangement is optional, for the reason that the by-pass may be positioned interiorly of said vessel as at J in Figure 2.

A vent K is provided on the vessel A at the top partthereof, said vent having a valve of any approved kind, whereby fluid pressure within chamber D may be permitted to escape, desirable in the operation.

- The operation is as follows; Valve F is opened, and valves B, E, are closed, whereupon the materials, such as a coarse mineral aggregate, sand and cement, in the desired proportions, are supplied through inlet f to the chamber D, water beingsupplicd as reguired to render the mass semi-plastic.

alve F is now closed, and valve E opened, valve B remaining closed. The charge passes from chamber D to mixing chamber A, whereupon valve E is again closed to cut off direct communication between mixing chamber-.A and accumulatingchamber D, except through the bypass. under the required pressure is supplied by 0 (min the cock for a desirable eriod' of time, thus admitting a blast of compressed air or gas to chamber A, the eflect of which is to ditlusethe sand and cement within the coarse mineral aggregate and to this ellect the mix of the Components of the charge of materials.

Following the closing of the valve E, valve F is opened. for a short period, and another charge of materials is accumulated within chamber D, the by-pass being shut ofi" during such charging period, and there after valve F closed and the by-pass opened, whereby the air or gas pressure supposited within the conduit, andforce l or moved to the pump I for priming the pump, and thereafter the gate or valve B is closed,

whereupon the mixed mass or' charge is moved through the conduit by fluid pressure supplied rerrwardly of the mass through pipe H and by partial vacuum or suction created in conduit C forwardly of the mass Air or gas by pump I, whereby the mixture may be transported for a desirable distance and the mixed mass during such period of transportation is subjected to further admixture by such pressure and suction. The pump I is or maybe located at a distance from vessel A, and said pump is aided in its action upon the charge by the rearward ressure of air or gas supplied by the pipe the delivery pipe i leading the charge or mixed mass from pump I to the point at which the concrete is utilized. While one charge is undergoing admixture within chamber A, another charge is being accumulated within chamber D, and while one charge is being mixed within chamber A, a previously mixed charge is undergoing transportation within conduit C. Thus the mixed masses are sup- )lied in successive charges to the conduit, and subjected to the action of the pump I and to fluid pressure of pipe H, the net result bein that the operations are continuous and carried out with economy of gas or air in the mixingand transporting stages of the method. By the use of chamber D and its valves E, F, the materials are ac cumulated within the hopper A during the mixing and transporting operations of other charges, and by using the valves E, F, in the required order the hopper remains open only for the periods required to deposit the materials within the hopper, thus minimizing the loss and waste of the air or gas, the chamber D functioning as an air-lock in econoi'nizing in the air or gas pressure, and in 'lt'eeding the charges into the mixing chamber.

In the apparatus of Figure 2, the construction is essentially the same as in Figure 1, except that the by-pass is positioned i11- teriorly of the vessel, and the pumpI is omitted, the successive charges of material being transported within the conduit by pressure supplied by the pipe H, which air or gas pressure is applied rearwardly of such successive charges. I

The apparatus of Figure 3 is substantially the same as the apparatus of Figures 1 and 2,,except. that the transportation of the mixed charges is effected by the action of a pump I located in close relation to the vessel A, the fluid pressure pipe H being dispensed with and the pump I relied upon to furnish the energy for the propulsion of the mixed charges. In this form ofapparatus, the pump 1 is fed with the charges directly from the hopper, and said pump is primed by the air or gas pressure upon the charges within chamber A.

Figure A there is shown another form apparatus by which my method of operation may be carried out. Asthere-shown, the vessel A provides a chamber within which is accumulated a charge and the air or gas pressure required to dislodge said charge Ion . of the charge and by pressure exerted upon and to feed such charge to the pump I for priming said pump. The admixture of the components of the charge is efl'ected mechanically by the action of a. suitable mixing mechanism, indicated at E. This mixer is positioned in an elevated relation to the hopper A, and said mixer is shown as having a charging or filling spoute and a dis charging spout (a The feed spout opens into the mixer E, and said spout is exposed for convenient access in order that the materials may be dumped into the spout and thus accumulated within said mixer to con stitute a charge. The materials thus accumulated-may be delivered by spout e by opening a suitable gate (not shown), said spout being in overhanging relation to the charging mouth f of the hopper A.

The charge is mixed within mixer E and supplied to hopper A, and such charge is forced from hopper A into the pump by the pressure ofair or gas supplied to vessel A by means of a valved pipe G, the valve g in which may be opened for the air or gas to flow into vessel A (valve I -being closed) so that the air or gas may be utilized to dislodge the mixed mass from hopper A and thus prime the pump I, whereby said hopper acts as an air lock in conserving the use of the compressed air or gas.

Having thus fully described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In the art of mixing and transporting materials such as concrete, the method which consists in accumulating within a chamber the materials to constitute a charge to be mixed; feeding said charge to a second chamber; blowing compressed air upwardly within the second chamber and exposing Y the com accents of the mass constitutin b said charge concurrently with the admixture of such charge; dislodging the mixed charge from the second. chamber by gravity the charge by the air accumulated above the charge; feeding the dislodged mixed mass constituting thecharge into a conduit, and transporting the mixed charge within said conduit.

'2. In the art of mixing materials such concrete, the method whichconsists in accumulating within a chamber the mate rials to constitute a charge to be mixed;

feeding the charge from said chamber to component materials of the charge first ad-.

mitted thereto thereby effecting the admix-- tureot the charge within the second chamber; accumulating the inflowing air under pressure within the second chamber and within the first chamber; dislodging from the second chamber the mixed charge by the pressure upon such charge of the air accumulated within the second chamber; and dislodging from the first chamber by the pressure of the air accumulated theiein the mass constitutingythe second charge, and feeding the latter to the first chamber.

3. In a mixer, a vessel provided at the bottom with a mixture outlet, means for feeding air or gas within said vessel, a pump connected to said vessel, and a valved chamber constituting an air lock within which is adapted to be accumulated the materials to form a charge, and means for controlling the flow of the charge from the air lock chamber to saidv vessel.

l. In a mixer, a vessel having an outlet, a pump the intake of which is connected to said vessel, means for blowing air or gas into said vessel, an air lock chamber within which is adapted to be accumulated the materials to constitute a charge, and means for feeding the charge of accumulated materials from the air lock chamber to the vessel.

In a mixer, a vessel having a mixture outlet, a pump connected to said vessel, means for feeding air or gas to the vessel, an air .ocl; chamber within which is adapted to be accumulated the materials to constitute charge, means for establishing the flow or" air or gas from the vessel to the air lock chamber, and means for discharging from the air lock chamber to the vessel the charge of materials accumulated within the air lock chamber. 7

6. In a mixer, a vessel having a mixture outlet, a pump, means for. feeding air or gas to said vessel, an air lock chamber within which is adapted to be accumulated'the materials to constitute a charge, a valved by-pass from the vessel. to the air lock chamber, and a valve for discharging the accumulated charge from the air lock cham-- bar to the vessel. 1

7. A concrete mixer embodying a vessel provided at its upper part with a charging opening and at its bottom part with a mixture outlet, means within said vessel dividing the interior of said vesselinto a lower mixing chamber and an upper hopper chamber, valves at the top and bottom of the hopper chamber, a conduit, and a valve.

for controlling the discharge through the mixture outlet to said conduit. I

8. A mixer embodying a vessel provided with an "interior member. positioned for dividing the same into a mixing chamber and an air lock chamber within which latter chamber may be accumulated the materials to constitute a charge to be mixed, means for controlling the flow of the charge from the air lock chamber to the mixing chamber, and means for blowing air or gas within the mixing chamber.

9, A mixer embodying a vessel provided with an interior member positioned for dividing the same into a mixing chamber and an air-lock chamber within which latter chamber may be accumulated the materials to constitute a charge to be mixed, means for controlling the flow of the charge from the air lock chamber to the mixing chamber, means for blowing air or gas within the mixing chamber, and means for the flow of air or gas from the mixing chamber into the air lock chamber.

10. A mixer embodying a vessel provided with an interior member positioned for dividing the same into a mixing chamber and an air lock chamber within which latter chamber may be accumulated the materials to constitute a charge to be mixed, a valve for cutting off the air lock chamber from the outside atmosphere, a separate valve for controlling the flow of the charge from the air lock chamber to the mixing chamber, means for blowing air or gas within the mixing chamber, and a discharge valve at the lower part of the mixing chamber.

11. A concrete mixer embodying a vessel provided with a chamber and with a mixture outlet, means for blowing air or gas into said chamber, a valved inlet at the top of said vessel, a chamber separate from the mixing chamber within which may be accumulated the materials of a charge adapted to be supplied to the mixing chamber, a conduit for the transport of the charges mixed successively within said mixing chamber, a pump connected to said con duit, and a valve between the mixing chamher and the conduit for controlling the discharge of said charges through the mixture outlet.

12. In the art of mixing and transporting materials such as concrete, the method which consists in accumulating within a chamber the materials constituting a charge to be mixed; feeding the charge from said chamber to a second chamber; accumulating in the first named chamber the materials to constitute a second charge to be mixed; blowing compressed air upwardly within the second chamber and exposing the components of the charge first admitted to said second chamber to the action of the upward flowing air, thereby effecting the admixture within the second chamber of the charge present therein; accumulating in the first chamber and in the second chamber the compressed air blown upwardly within the second chamber; dislodging from the second chamber the mixed charge by the pressure upon such charge of the air accumulated in said second chamber; dislodging from the first chamber the charge subsequently deposited therein by the pressure of the air accumulated in the second chamber, and scavenging the walls of the first chamher from adhesions of material by the out flow of air from the first chamber into the second chamber.

13. In an apparatus for mixing and transporting concrete materials; a mixing chamber having a valved outlet; a charge accumulating chamber having a valved inlet and a valved outlet, adapted to feed a charge of materials to said mixing chamber; means for blowing compressed air upwardly within said mixing chamber; means where by the upwardly flowing air is accumulated within the charge-accunmlating chamber; a conduit into which a charge from the mixing chamber is adapted to flow under pressure of air accumulated within said mixing chamber, and means co-operable with said conduit for effecting the transportation therein of successive charges supplied from said mixing chamber.

14. In an apparatus for mixing and transporting concrete materials, a mixing chamber, a valved outlet from the lower part of said n'iixing chamber, a conduit connected for communication with said valved outlet, means for feeding a charge of materials to said mixing chamber; means connected with the lower part of the mixing chamber for blowing compressed air upwardly within said mixing chamber, and accumulating air under pressure therein, and a pump mechanism havingits intake connected with the conduit, whereby the pump mechanism is primed with the mixed charge of materials adapt-ed to be dislodged from said mixing chamber by the pressure of air accumulated therein.

15. In an apparatus for handling mixed materials, a chamber, a conduit leading from said chamber, means for blowing air into chamber, and an air lock chamber having a valved inlet and a valved outlet, whereby air is confined within said air lock chamber upon opening the valved outlet for discharging a charge of materials from the air lock chamber into the first named chamber.

16. In an apparatus for handling mixed materials, a chamber, a conduit leading from said chamber,'means for blowing air into said conduit, and an air lock chamber having a valved inlet and a valved outlet, said air lock chamber functioning as means for precluding the escape of air from the first chamber when the valved outlet is opened for discharging a charge of materials from the air lock chamber to the first named chamber. 1

17. In an apparatus for handling mixed materials, a chamber, a conduit leading inlet valve to the air lock chamber for pre-' therefrom, means :for feeding air to the mateeluding the outflow of air from the first rial containing space, an air lock chamber chamber to the atmosphere when the outlet 10 Within which materials may be accumulated valve is opened.

to form a charge, an outlet Valve for con- In testimony whereof I have hereto signed trolling the How of the charge from the air my name this 17th day of September, 1925. lock chamber to the first chamber, and an KARL R. SOI-IUSTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2710232 *Jun 14, 1950Jun 7, 1955Holden John HMethod for filling cavities with granular solids
US2732107 *May 11, 1953Jan 24, 1956 Metering and shakedown means for
US2753220 *Mar 27, 1953Jul 3, 1956Maxwell F KemperApparatus for controlling the application of concrete in the lining of tunnels
US2819122 *Dec 30, 1953Jan 7, 1958Dracco CorpLow pressure pneumatic conveyor
US2942860 *Mar 5, 1956Jun 28, 1960Klosterman Richard LConcrete gun, mixer and sandblaster
US3187401 *Feb 28, 1963Jun 8, 1965Harbison Walker RefractoriesFeeding system for a brick press
US3432151 *Jan 26, 1967Mar 11, 1969Halliburton CoPortable sand-fluid blender
US4046358 *May 10, 1976Sep 6, 1977National Service Industries, Inc.Method and apparatus for mixing and dispensing material
US4815860 *Apr 20, 1988Mar 28, 1989Degussa AktiengesellschaftMethod and device for the continuous dosing of powdery substances by means of high-pressure gas
US5160222 *Nov 30, 1990Nov 3, 1992Tech-Air, Inc.Pneumatic conveying system
US6045299 *Apr 13, 1998Apr 4, 2000International Business Machines Corp.Unidirectional gate between interconnecting fluid transport regions
US6149498 *Dec 16, 1999Nov 21, 2000International Business Machines CorporationSemiconductor wafer handling system
US7104207Apr 29, 2004Sep 12, 2006Cnh America LlcAir seeder tank arrangement
US20050241070 *Apr 29, 2004Nov 3, 2005Cnh America LlcAir seeder tank arrangement
EP1873094A1 *Jun 28, 2007Jan 2, 2008GŁnter BaldersMethod of conveying mortar and screed and mortar and screed conveyor for carrying out the method
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/5, 406/125
International ClassificationB65G53/00, B65G53/32, B65G53/46, B65G53/40
Cooperative ClassificationB65G53/4691, B65G53/32
European ClassificationB65G53/32, B65G53/46H