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Publication numberUS1685785 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 2, 1928
Filing dateOct 30, 1924
Priority dateOct 30, 1924
Publication numberUS 1685785 A, US 1685785A, US-A-1685785, US1685785 A, US1685785A
InventorsMuth John H
Original AssigneeC F Heinkel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lock means
US 1685785 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. H. WIIUTll-ll Filed Oct. 30, 1924:

IINVIENTOR ATTORNEY BY W, I

Patented Met. 2, 12%..

It. HEINKEL, OE CLEVELAND;

LOCK MEANS.

Application filed October 30, 1924. $eria1 No. 746,750.

My invention relates to lock means between associable members for such mechanisms as guide bushings telescoping into each other.

Une of the objects of my invention is a sim ple, inexpensive and efficient lock means between associable members of a mechanism.

Another object is to provide a mechanism having insertable members with means whereby the insertion of one member into the other automatically and positively locks them to each other.

Another object is to provide a. n'iechanisni having associable members with means whereby the removal of one member from the other automatically and positively unlocks them from each other.

Another object is to provide a mechanism having associable members with a lock means 'Wll'lCliiS not subject to bending or breaking.

Another object is to provide a mechanism having associable members with a lock means which is conlined entirely within the bushing to prevent breakage thereof or tampering therewith.

. Another object is to provide such mechanism as a guide bushing having a liner bushing and a plurality of slip bushings with a lock means common to all bushings so that either of the slip bushings may be inserted into the liner bushing, and automatically locked therein upon insertion thereof and automatically unlocked therefrom upon re moval thereof.

lln guide bushings for instance, particular-- ly those for guiding tools, boring bars etc, as used in, rapid production, it quite neces sary that lmshings can be changed quickly and that these bushings are locked in desired relation to each other with the least amount of time and effort.

I attain the above objects and necessities by the mechanism illustrated in the accompanying drawing in which Fig. 1 is a perspective view, partly in section, of a guide, bushing embodying the features of my invention, showing the relations of the elements.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the liner bushing of Fig. 1, showing the retainerpin in position. i Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the slip bushingof Fig. 1, showing the groove in the head adapted to the pin of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a perspective viewof a guide bushing, similar to Fig. 1, partly in section to show more clearly the relation of the elements with a modified retainer pin.

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the liner bush ng of Fig. 4 showing the retainer pin in position. V

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the slip bushing of Fig. 4 showing the groove in the head adapted to the pm of Fig. 5.

1* 1g. 7 is a perspective view of a liner bushlng showing another modified retainer pin.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view of a slip bushmg adapted to the liner bushing of Fig. 7 and showing the groove in the head adapted to the pm of Fig. 7. i

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the views Referring now to Figs. 1, 2. and 3. The guide bushing shown here comprises the liner bu slung lt, the slip bushing l3 and the pin C.

the liner bushing A has the bore 10, the head 11. and the counterbore 12 in this head.

The slip bushing B has the body 13 fitting to the bore as usual in telescoping busliings, and also has the head 'l l loosely fitting into the counterbore 12. y L

The relations of the bushings A andli. when in operative position, is shown in Fig. 1: While the guide bushing is in operation. it is quite desirable that some means is provided to retain the bushings in desired relation to ich other by preventing either a rotative or a lougitiulinal movement, or both of these inoven'ieuts of the slip bushing in the liner bashing. it is also desirable that the slip laushins can be changed the least amount of time and labor,

The mechanism illustrated attains these desirable features by arranging the elements so thatthe slip bushing automatically locks itself while the same is being inserted into the liner bushing without any extra operation other than the act of inserting the slip bushing and so that the slip bushing automatically unl cks itself while the same is being removed lfl'Oll'l.t-l18 liner bushing without any other operation than the act of removing the slip bushing and so that the slio bushing auto-- matically seats itself in the liner bushing when in desired relation thereto.

In Figs. 1 and 2 I have shown one manner of mounting a means for attaining the desirable features set forth in the preceding paragraph which means comprises the pin C driven into the head 11 and partly projecting into quickly and with tit] loo

the counterbore 12. In thisinstance, the pin C is inclined to the axis of the guide bushing in one plane but is parallel therewith in a plane at right angles to the first plane, The inclination to the first plane is best seen in Fig. 2 whilethe parallel oi the second plane is best seen in Fig. 1. It is observed that the pin C is partly embedded, longitudinally, in the material of the head 11 at 15 and that the lower part 16 thereof'is wholly embedded in the bottom of the counterbore 12. This arrangement supports the pin C throughout its entire I length and thereby prevents the bending or breaking thereof.

V The head l lof the slip bushing B is provided with the groove 17 inclined to correspond to the inclinationot the pin C.

\Vhile the bushing B is being inserted into the'bushing A, the pin C engages the groove 17 and thereby guides the'bushing B into de sired position in the bushing A.

After the bushing B is fully inserted in the bushing A, the entire length of the pin C engages the groove 17 and thereby forms a substantial abutment or retainer or lock means between both of the bushings which can not be destroyed easily since the pin C is supported in the bushing A throughout its entire length and, therefore, can not bend or be broken o'it either whilethe bushings are handled or during the use thereof.

i The angular disposition of the pin C prevents the bushing B from moving longitudinally in the'bushing A since the side 18 ot the groove 17 engages the side 19 of the pin G and prevents such longitudinal movement unless the bushing B is rotated according to the inclination of the pin C.

When removing the bushing B from the bushing A, it is only necessary to push the bushing B longitudinally which action causes the bushing B to rotate according to the inclination of the pin C while it is moving longitudinally out of the bushing A.

In Figs. 1-, 5, and 6, I have shown a modification ot' the lock and retainer means. In this modification, the bushing D tits into and is inserted into and removed l rom the bushing E similar to the bushings A and B previously described but the lock means shown here has the additional. feature of exerting a wedging action on the lower side of the pin F to lock the two bushings to each other more positively than the lock means shown in Figs. 1, 2, and 3. This wedging action, however, should not be carried'to a sufliciently high degree to prevent the ready removal of the bushing D from the bushing E.

In this modification, the pin F is also driven into the head of the bushing E, as in the bushing A, but is here inclined in two directions, i. e. in one plane the pin F is inclined to the longitudinal axis of the bushing while in a plane at'right angles to the first plane it is also inclined to this longitlulinal axis so that'only the upper portion 20 projccts into the counter-bore 21 while the pin F is otherwise embedded similar to the pin C.

The bushing D is provided with the groove 22 in the head 23. It is observed that the groove 22 is arcuate in contour tor the purpose of providing a wcdging engagement between the side 2i ot the pin F and the side 25 of the groove 3 when the bushing D is fully inserted in the bushing E and given a slight rotative movement. The pin F itself is straight, it is therefore necessary to doubly incline this pin so that the portion 20 only projects into the counterbore 21 to engage the arcuate groove 22 to guide and to retain the bushing D in the bushing E.

It is observed that the arcuate i'mmation o t the groove 22 is not the natural result of a groove cut straight and around on the circmn'lercntial surface of the head 23 and that.

-the groove 22 is actually cut arcuate around his surface to acquire the necessary wcdgiu action on the bottom of the side 2- 1; oi the pin F and that the arcuate formation of the groove is inclined to the longitiulinal axis of the bushing.

In Fl 7 and S I have shown another modification of a guide and retainer means. In this modification the pin G is also partly embedded in the head of the bushing H and also partly projects into the counticrbore 26 similar to the pin C previously described but: in this instance the pin G is not inclined in any manner and the head of the bushing J is provided with the groove 27 also uninclined to correspond to the pin G.

The structure of this last modification is the most simple and inexpensive and prevents the bushing J from rotation in the bushing II in either direction but does not prevent the longitudinal movement of the bushing J in the bushing H.

In the guide bushings illustrated in the accompanying drawings I have shown a pin to act as guide and retainer and lock means mounted in the head of the liner bushing in each instance. This is the most convenient manner of providing such a means since there is more metal there to mount in and the groove can readily be provided in the head of the slip bushing. In either manner of mounting of the pin or other guide or rctainer or lock means the groove is formed to suit the pin.

It is understood that such a pin or other similar means may be mounted other than in the head of the liner bushing as shown in all o l: the illustrations; for instance, it may be mounted at the bottom of the liner bushing, or in the head of the slip bushing, or at the bottom of the slip bushing. Such guide or retainer or lock means may also be formed directly on the material of the bushings.

Modifications other than. those shown and ion ill

eas /ea ,3,

described and pointed out may be made within the scope Off the appended claims; therotore, without limiting myselt to the precise construction and arrangement oi elements shown and descril :Li and pointed out.

it claim 1. In a lock means, associablc members to be locked to each other, a pin having one end thereof lined in one of said members, the ii'en'iainder of said pin partly embedded in said one member throughout the major portion of the length thereof, said pin disposed at an angle so that the end of said partly em bedded portion projects further from the Wall 01' said one member than the other portion thereof, and another one of said members to be locked to said one member having a groove arranged to engage both sides 01'' said projecting portion of the pin so that either a longtitudinal movement between the memhers in one direction creates a rotative movement between the members in one direction or a rotative movement between the members in one direction creates a longitudinal move ment between the members in one direction to lock the members to each other both longitudin ally and rotatively and so that a reversal of said movements automatically disengages the members from each other.

2. In a lock means, associable members to be locked to each other, one of said members having a groove and a shoulder abutablc on another one of said members, to be locked to said one n'iember, a pin having one end thereof fixed in said other member, the remainder of said pin partly embedded in said other member throughout the major portion of the length thereof, said pin disposed at an angle so that the end of said partly embedded portion projects further from the wall oi? said other member than the remainder thereof, and said groove arranged to engage both sides at said projecting portion of the pin so that either a longitudinal movement between the men'ibers in one direction creates a rotative movement between the members in one direction or a rotative movement between the members in one direction creates a longitudinal movement between the members in one direction and thereby abuts said shoulder on said other member to lock the members to each other longitudinally and to arrest the rotative movement between the members when said shoulder so abuts said other member and so that a reversal of said movements automatically disengages the members from each other in a guide bushing, a liner bushing, a slip bushing inscrtable into and lockable to and unlockable from said liner bushing, a pin projecting from the wall of one of said bushings and supported therein throughout the major portion of the length thereof, a portion out said pin projecting from said wall, the outer end of said pin projecting further from said wall. than the remainder thereof, and the other one of said bushings having a groove arranged to engage both sides of said projecting portion of the pin so that either a longitudinal n'iovement between the bushings in one direction creates a rotative movement between the bushings in one direction or a rotative movement between the bushings in one direction creates a longitudinal movement between the bushings in one direction to lock the bushings to each other both longitudinally and rotatively and so that a reversal of said movements automatically disengages the bushings ttromeach other.

41-. In a guide bushing, a liner bushing having a bore and a counterbore, a slip bushing having a body adapted to said bore and a head adapted to said counterbore, a pin fixed in said liner bushing and supported therein throughout the major portion of the length thereof, a portion of said pin projecting into said counterbore, one end of said pin projecting "further into said counterbore than the remainder thereof, and a groove in the wall of said head and arranged to engage both sides oi. said projecting portion of the pin so that either a longitudinal movement between the bushings in one direction creates a rotative movement between the bushings in one direction or a rotative movement between the bushings in one direction creates a longitudinal movement between the bushings in one direction to lock the bushings to each other both longitudinally and rotatively and so that a reversal of said movements automatically disengages the bushings from each other.

JOHN H. MUTH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2942500 *Dec 12, 1958Jun 28, 1960Conner Guy OSlip head drill bushing
US4521140 *Oct 3, 1983Jun 4, 1985Doescher George CFor supporting a drill or similar tool during operation
US7033363May 19, 2004Apr 25, 2006Sean PowellSnap-lock for drill sleeve
US20110064531 *Dec 5, 2007Mar 17, 2011Howard George OsborneCutting apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification408/241.00R, 408/115.00R, 408/115.00B
International ClassificationB23B49/00, B23B49/02
Cooperative ClassificationB23B49/023
European ClassificationB23B49/02B