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Publication numberUS1689400 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1928
Filing dateMar 14, 1922
Priority dateMar 14, 1922
Publication numberUS 1689400 A, US 1689400A, US-A-1689400, US1689400 A, US1689400A
InventorsManley Lee Lincoln
Original AssigneeRca Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Loop antenna
US 1689400 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 30, 1928. 1,689,400

L. L. MANLEY LOOP ANTENNA Filed March 14. 1922 j 2 sheets-sheet 1 vweutoz LEE L. MA N LET QMMWOQQ %a W Patented Oct. 30, 1928.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

LEE LINCOLN OF AMERICA, A. CORPORATION OF DELAWARE.

L001? ANTENNA.

Application filed March 14, 1922. Serial No. 543,611.

The present invention relates to antennae for receiving radio signals and more particularly to an improved arrangement for a loop antenna forsmall receiving sets such as are used by amateurs.

For receiving radio telegraphy and telehony loop antennae are convenient especialwhere the use of overhead wires is objectionable or prohibited. In such cases it is usually desirable to have the loop antenna indoors, particularly when a portable receiving set is being used. The ordinary construction of loop antenna consists-of a number of turns of wire mounted on a frame and is quite l6 heavy and bulky and does not present a good appearance when used in a home or auditorium. It also cannot be readily set up, taken down or stored away as is desirable and therefore this has to a certain extent hindered the introduction in certain instances of apparatus for receiving radio telegraphy and telephony, such as broadcasting re ceivers.

The object of the invention is to provide 2 a loop antenna construction which avoids the diificulties set forth and which is also inexpensive to manufacture.

In accordance with the invention, the turn or turns of wire comprising the loop antenna are attached to a flexible sheet of material so that it may be rolled up in a convenient compact form. A loop antenna is directional and receives best when normal to the wave front of the waves to be received. To facilitate adjustment a sup-port is pro vided at one end of the roll having a swivel or pivot so that the antenna may be rotated about a vertical axis.

In a particularly convenient embodiment of the invention the structure is mounted somewhat likea window shade and operated in a similar manner.

The novel features which I believe to be characteristic of my invention are particularly set forth in the appended claims, the

invention itself, however, both as to its construction and mode ofo eration, together with further objects and a vantages thereof, will best be understood b reference to the 9 following description, ta en in connection with the-accompanying drawings in which:

HARLEY, OF BROOKLYN, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO RADIO CORPORATION Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a construetion 1n accordance with the invention.

Flgs. 2 and 3 are perspective views of modified supporting structures. Figs. 4, 5 and 6 show a tion.

In Fi 1 the invention is illustrated in a manner 1n which it may be used in a. window frame although it will be evident that it may be attached to a wall orother part of a building for example." The conductor 1 forming the loop may be a fine bare or insulated wire 1 sewed or otherwise attached to the sheet or fabric of'a flexible curtain 2 which is adapted to be wound on a roller 3. One or more turns may be utilized as desired and these maybe close together near the edge or wound 1n splral shape of rectangular, circular or other contour. The terminals of the loop are brought out at any suitable points, for example, at the bottom of the sheet where they are attached to binding posts 4 and 5 fitted in the reinforcing strip -6. If desired one or more intermediate leads may be brought out from the intermediate turns and fastened to binding posts 8 to facilitate tuning. Anarm further modificaor bracket 9 for supporting the roller is hinged for rotation about a vertical axis, the hinge 10 being fastened to the window frame or wall in any appropriate manner. By this means the plane of the sheet may be turned through substantially 180 so that the plane of the loop may be adjusted to the optimum position for reception of signals from any direction. If desired, a ca-tch'may be utilized for holding the arm in the window frame or wall,but usually the friction of the hinge will be sufficient to maintain the arm'in any position to which it is adapted. The roller may be attached to the arm to permit rotation in Variousways, but a convenient construction as shown utilizes the usual spring roller to which a window shade is attached having pins 12, 18 fitting into arms 14, 15 attached to opposite ends of the bracket. As shown, one of the brackets 14 is slotted for receiving the flat or stationary pin 12 of the roller in order to facilitate removal. The rotating pin 13 is fitted in a circular hole. As the construction of the roller and its supports is well known, it will be unnecessary to particularly will be noted that the arms are both connected to the hinged bracket so that the roller may be swung around a vertical axis. When not in use the sheet is rolled up the same-as an ordinary window shade. To put the antenna in service it is merely pulled down, connected to the receiving set and adjusted to any desired plane.

The construction of Fig. 2 is similar to Fig.

1 but has a roller bearing 16 such as used in casters, the of the window frame or ceiling.

plate 17 being attached to the top Fig. 3 shows a diflerent type of hinge in which the pin 18 projecting from the window frame fits in a socket 19 attached to the rotatable arm. A catch such as the pin 20 and socket 21 is also provided for holding the lower end when the loop is pulled down so that the sheet is eld more or less fixed along one edge.

y In some instances it may be convenient to, eliminate the leads from the-bottom of the shade and to provide permanent connections from the loop to the receiving set. This may be accomplished for example, by having the leads extend from the roller end instead of the other edges. This may be done'in various ways, for example, with the ordinary shade as shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 6. In Fig. lthe.

insulated bearing. Another binding post 27 is electrically connected to the bracket. Electrical connection from the other end of the loopgto the binding post 27 will be made in the following manner using an ordinaryshade roller. The metal cap 23 is electrically connected to the end ofthe loop. When the shade is not being drawn up or down the cap is electrically connected to the slotted bearing of the arm 14 through the rectangulartip 12 and the cam 28- forming a part thereof contacts with the dog 29 which is fastened by the pivot pin 30 to a disk of metal 31 fitting in the cap. This arrangement permits the antenna to be rol ed u in the same manner as Fig. 1 and withoutt e necessity of providing conspicuous leads to the detector.

Obviously the roller may be located at or near the floor and the free end drawn up in order to spread the loop.

Only 90 adjustment is required to place the loop normally to any wave front and therefore the vertical axis ma be placed in a corner if desired instead 0 in a position where 180 rotation is permitted.

In the description the window shade types have been particularly described although all of the features thereof need not be utilized describe these details although it .arm attached to one I sheet and the conductor into and various modifications may be madewithout departing from the spirit of the invention. Having described my invention, what 'I claim is:

1. A loop antenna construction comprising a coiled conductor and a support in the form of a sheet of flexible material having its surface disposed in an optimum plane for desired reception, said coilbeing mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of said sheet. a

2. A loop antenna construction comprisin a coiled conductor consisting of a number 0 turns and a support for said conductor in the form of a sheet of flexible material surface disposed in an optimum sired reception said conductorbemg mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of said sheet and the turns being maintained in spaced relation thereby. 3..An antenna construction comprising a support in the form of a having its" plane for de-' sheet of flexible materlal adapted to be disposed in an optimum plane for desired reception, a wire like conductor mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of the flexible material and a roller attached to said sheet and-ada ted to have said sheet and-conductor wound t ereon.

4. A loop antenna construction com rising a support In the form of a sheet of flexible material adapted to be disposed in an optimum plane for desired reception a coiled conductor mountedinithe plane and within the marginal lines of said sheet and conductor wound thereon.

v sheet and a roller attached to said sheet and adapted to have saidice 5. A loop antenna construction comprising a support in the form of a sheet of flexible material adapted to be disposed in an optimum plane for desired reception, a coiled conductor mounted in the lane and within the marginal lilies of said s eet and a roller'attached to one edge of said sheetada ted to have said sheet and conductor wound t ereon.

6. A loop antenna construction com risin an antenna support in the form of a s met 0 flexible material adapted to be disposed in an optimum plane for desired reception, an antenna conductor mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of said edge of said sheet and a swivel at one end of the arm to permit rotation of the sheet and thereto.

7 v A loop antenna -construction a support in' the form of a'sheet of flexible material adapted to-be disposed in an'opti mum plane for desired reception, an antenna conductor mounted in the plane andwithin the-marginal lines taehed to said sheet and ada ted to have said sheet and conductor woun thereon and a swivel at one end of the roller for rotating the diiferentplanes.

sheet, .an

the conductor attached comprising,

p of said sheet, a roller at-' 8. A100 antenna construction com rising .a support 1n the form of a sheet of exible material adapted to be disposed in an optimum plane for desired reception, a conductor mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of said sheet, a roller attached to one i edge of said sheet adapted to have said sheet and conductor wound thereon and a swivel for said roller having a vertical axis for rotating the sheet and conductor into different vertical planes.

9. A'loop antenna construction comprising a support 1n the form of a sheet of flexible material ada ted to be disposed in an optimum plane or desired reception, a coiled conductor mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of said sheet, a roller attached to one edge of said sheet adapted to have said sheet and conductor wound thereon, a bracket for supporting said roller and a swivel connected to said bracket for rotat ng the sheet in different planes.

10. A loop antenna construction comprising asupport 111 the form, of a sheet of flexible material, adapted to be disposed 1n an optimum plane for desired reception, a conductor mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of said sheet, a spring roller attached to one edge of said sheet, said sheet and conductor being adapted to be rolled on and off said roller under the action of the spring. v 0

11. A loop antenna construction comprising a support in the form of a sheet of flexible material adapted to be disposed in an optimum plane for desired reception, a conductor mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of said sheet, a spring roller attached to one edge of said sheet, said sheet and conductor being adapted to be rolled on and off sa1d roller under the action of the spring and a support for said roller. 12. A loop antenna construction comprisin a support in the form of a sheet of flexib e material adapted to be disposed in an optimum plane for desired recept1on, a conductor mounted in the plane and within themarginal lines of said'sh'eet, a sprin roller attached to one edge of said sheet, said sheet and conductor being adapted to be rolled on and off said roller under the action of the spring, a support for said roller and a pivot for said support. v

13. An antenna constructioncompnsmg a support in the form-of a sheet of flexible mav terial adapted to be disposed in an optimum plane for desired reception, a conductor mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of said sheet, a spring roller attached to one edge of said sheet, said sheet and conduc-.

tor be1n adapted to be rolled on and'ofi of said rol er under the action of the s ring, a support for said roller and a pivot $01 said support located at one end thereof.

14. An antenna construction comprising a support in the form of a sheet of flexible ma-. terial, adapted to be disposed in an optimum plane for desired reception, a conductor mounted in the plane and within the marginal lines of said sheet, a spring roller attached to one edge of said sheet, said sheet and con-- ductor being adapted to be rolled on and ofl said roller under the action of said spring, a support for said roller, and a pivot for said support, said pivot being disposed so that the .sheet is rotatable into different vertical planes. 15. A loop antenna construction comprismg a su mum plane for desired rece tion, a conductor mounted in the plane and within the marginal pport in the form of a sheet of flexible. materia adapted to be disposed in an optilines of said sheet, a roller attached to one edge of said sheet, a pivot for said roller and leads connected to the end of said coiled conductor extending to terminals attached to the edge of said sheet which is located on the ed e opposite that which is attached to the rol er.

16. An antenna comprising'a su port in the form of a flat sheet of flexible fa ric, and an antenna conductor secured to said sheet and conformed to provide a plurality of turns which are maintained in spaced relation and in substantially the same plane by said fabric,

said fabric with the conductor secured thereto 7 LEE LINCOLNMANLEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4970524 *Feb 13, 1989Nov 13, 1990The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyBroadband transmission line coupled antenna
US5115249 *Aug 28, 1990May 19, 1992Grumman Aerospace CorporationArrangement for window shade-deployed radar
US5313221 *Jun 22, 1992May 17, 1994The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Air ForceSelf-deployable phased array radar antenna
US7057563May 28, 2004Jun 6, 2006Raytheon CompanyRadiator structures
US7126553Oct 2, 2003Oct 24, 2006The United States Of America As Represented By The Administrator Of The National Aeronautics And Space AdministrationDeployable antenna
US7489285 *Oct 18, 2005Feb 10, 2009Checkpoint Systems, Inc.Collapsible electronic article surveillance gate
US8451180Nov 23, 2009May 28, 2013Aerovironment, Inc.Integrated antenna and display shade
US20050264448 *May 28, 2004Dec 1, 2005Cox Gerald ARadiator structures
US20060082510 *Oct 18, 2005Apr 20, 2006Checkpoint Systems, Inc.Collapsible electronic article surveillance gate
US20110122029 *Nov 23, 2009May 26, 2011Aerovironment , Inc.Integrated antenna and display shade
WO2006001873A1 *Apr 8, 2005Jan 5, 2006Raytheon CompanyAntenna radiator structures
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/868, 343/720, 343/880, 343/897, 343/877
International ClassificationH01Q7/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/44, H01Q7/00, H01Q1/087
European ClassificationH01Q1/44, H01Q7/00, H01Q1/08D1