Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1690266 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1928
Filing dateNov 7, 1925
Priority dateNov 7, 1925
Publication numberUS 1690266 A, US 1690266A, US-A-1690266, US1690266 A, US1690266A
InventorsBarrett Harold G
Original AssigneeBarbarite Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shaft for golf clubs and the like
US 1690266 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1928.

Filed Nov- V, 1925 llll'f l \y Q. QJ

vPatented Nov. 6, 1,928.

`UNITEDsrarss PATENT OFFICE.

HAROLD @.BARRETT, or WILME'ITE, ILLINOIS, AssIGNon rIo BARBARITE ooarona- 'iIoN, or CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION or ILLINOIS.

SHAFT FOR GOLF CLUBS AD THE LIKE.

Application led November 7, 1925. Serial No. 67,531. i'.

This invention relates to improvements in shafts., particularly adapted, though not necessarily-limited in its use for golf clubs, andone' of the objects of the invention'is to provide a-'sliteriibodying a core and an improved `gouter shell of non-metallic composition of matter for the core, the portion of the 'casing orshell intermediate thevhead of the club and the handle grip being-free from the core, whereby there will be created a certain free motion or action4 between the core and the outer shell or casing, with the result that the whipping action of theclub will loe greatly increased. Y

A further object is to provide an improved shaft of this character in which the outer shell or casing and the core will be fastened at the top or grip end of the shaft against relative rotary movement thereby producing a golf club shaft having the proper stiffness and flexibility and at the Sametime theshaft will be provided with a maximum amount of Y torque.

A further object is to provide an improved shaft of this character embodying a tubular 'casing of non-metallic composition and a core which is telescoped into the' casing, the the tube and core being fastened together at both ends against relative rotary movement, the intermediate portions being free from each other whereby freedom of action of the shaft will be provided, the outerfshell or casing by being fastened to the hea'dfof the club will produce the necessary torque and at the same time will permit of theuse-of a rigid core in the construct-ion of the shaft.

With such a construction 4the shaft will not only be strengthened and re-enforced. but the required flexibility of the shaft will not be interfered with and at the same time the shaft will be of the desired or required weight and rigidity.

To the attainment of these ends and the accomplishment of other new and useful obiects as will appear, the invention consists in the features of novelty insubstantially the construction, combination and arrangement of the several parts hereinafter more fully described and claimed and shown in the accompanying drawing illustrating this invention, and in which 0 y v Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of the club end of a shaft constructed in accordance with the principles of this invention.

Figure 2 is a longitudinal ysectional view 55 ofthe handle or grip end of the shaft. y Figure 2f* is a detail sectional view on linie .2L-2a, Figure 2. f l

Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure l of the outer non-metallic casing or covering of the shaft, showing the same secure-d to the head. Figure 4 is a detail longitudinal sectional view of one end of a tubular metallic reenforcing core. I 5

Figure 5 is a longitudinal sectional view 65 of the head end of another form of the invention.

igure 6 is a horizontal sectional view taken 'on line 6 6, Figure 3.

` 'Figure 7 is a transverse sectionalvview of 70 a solid re-enforcing core.

Figure 8 is an enlarged detail longitudinal sectional view showing one form of fastening for securing the re-enforcing core and casing together and for securing the casing to the head of the club.

Figure 9 is a detail side elevation of two of the fastening members.

Figure 10 is a side elevation o'fanotherone of the fastening members. 30

Figure 11 is a side elevation of still another one of the fastening members.

Referring more particularly to the drawing thenumeral 15 designates generally an outer tubular shell or casing of any desired diameter and preferably of a tapered configr uration., This casing is constructed of a non- 4 metallic material, preferably a composition 'of matter known as as by means of a suitable. cement or fastening on glue.

Telescoped into and encased within the casing 15 is a rte-enforcing core .17 which is preferably tapered and tubular andconstructed f of metal. v Thecore 17 is secured to the casing 1'5 at the extremitiesthereof in any desired or suit-` able manner and the portions of the 'casing' and coreintermediate the securing `means are free from each other so as to permit of a certain free motion or action between the core and the outer casing or tube. At the grip or handle end of the shaft suitable fastenlng devices 18 may be provided such as pins or fastening rivets which pass transversely through slots 18 in the casing and core to permit of a relative longitudinal movement of the core and casing but will pre` vent a relative rotary movement thereof. The adjacent extremity of the core is preferably closed by means of a bumper element 19 secured in position in any suitable manner.

The other extremity of the core and casing are secured together in any desired or suitable manner and against relative rotary movement, preferably as follows. The lower extremity of the core 17 is closed as at 20 and is provided with an aperture 21 opening therethrough and having left hand threads therein. The lower extremity 'of the casing 15 is preferably provided with spaced lugs or extensions 22 which are adapted to co-operate with correspondingr lugs or projections 23 on an anchor member 24, the latter being provided with radially projecting teeth or ribs 25. The head of the club 16 is provided with an opening 26. This opening 2G is preferably provided with recesses 27 adapted to receive the ribs'or projections 25 and thereby lock the element 24 against relative rotary movement with respect to the head 16. The element 24 is adapted to be inserted into the opening 26 so that the ribs or projections 25 will enter the recesses 27 and so that the lugs 23 thereon will interlock with the lugs 22 on the lower end'of the casing 15. The lower extremity of the core 17 preferably terminates short of the lower extremity of the casing 15, and a fastening device 28, preferably in the form of a screw having left hand threads and a head129 is provided for connecting the member or element 24 with the core 17. The body of the member 28 passes loosely through the element 24 and is threaded into the recess 21 in the end 20 of the core 17, the head 29 resting against the face of the element 24 so that when-the element 28 is rotated it will be threaded into the opening 21 of the end 2070i the core 17 and there will be a tendency of the member 28 to impart a relatively longitudinal movement to ,the core 17 and casing 15 to draw the two together and cause them to be rigidly or tirmly held with respect. to eachother. The left hand threads in the screw 18 a'nd in the aperture 21 in the end 20 of the core 17 will have a tendency to tighten the screw and draw the core and casing together when the head 16 receives an impact, whereas if the threads were right hand threads such an action of the head would have a tendency to loosen the screw which is not desirable.

Threaded into the member 28 is a screw 30, the extremity 31 of `which co-operates with inclined faces 32 in the end of the member 28, the latter being split as at 33 to permit the same to be slightly expanded and thereby lock the member 28 in its adjusted position.

If desired a covering 34 of any suitable material may be provided on the grip end of the shaft.A

In the form of the invention shown in Figures 4 and'5, the core 17 is telescoped into the casing 15 and the lower extremity of the core 17 is secured to the lower extremity of the casing15 and both are secured to the head 16 of the club in any suitable manner. preferably by meansof fastening devices 35 in the form of pinsor rivets which pass through the head and through the core and casing, thereby preventing relative rotary movement of these parts.

In this form of the invention the recess 27 in the end of the club may be closed by a suitable plug 36.

In the form of the invention shown in Figure 7 the core 37 is of a solid construction suchas wood and is adapted to be telescoped into and encased within the shell or casing 15 and the extremities of the core may be secured in a manner similar to the manner as described in connection with the form of the invention shown in Figure 5, or may be fastened within the head in any desired or suitable manner.

lVith this invention there is provided a golf club shaft having an outer tubular shell of non-metallic material which is loose or separate from the core intermediate the extremities of the shaft, the shell and core being fastened together at the extremity of the s aft and against relative rotary movement., with the result that there will be provided a shaft for golf clubs having the proper stiffness and flexibility and yet there will be provided a maximum amount of torque.

By reasonV ofthe fact that the outer shell or casing is free from the core intermedlate the fastening means at the extremities of the core there will be created a certain free action or motion between the core and the outer tube or casing. If the casing and core are secured together intermediate the extremities,v or the fastening means at the extremities, there would not be produced the free fiexible motion or action that is necessary in a golf club, with the result that the whipping action of the club would be impaired, but by maintaining the core and casing detached from each other intermediate the fastening means, the whipping action of the shaftwill be increased and at the same time the necessary torque will be created and it will be possible to employ a rigid core.

While the preferred forms of the invention have been herein shown and described, it is to be understood that various changes may be made in the details of construction and in the combination and arrangement of llU the several parts, within theVV scope of the "gether, the portions of the core and casing intermediate the said securing means being free for slight relative movement.

2. A shaft for golf clubs embodying a tubular non-metallic casing, a core telescoped into and fitting within the casing, and means securing the ends of the core and casing together, the portions of Ithe corel and casing intermediate the said securing means being free for slight relative rotary movement.

3. A. shaft for golf clubs embodying a:

tubular non-metallic casing, a hollow metallic core telescoped into and fitting within the casing, andv means securing the ends of the core and casing together, the portions of the core and casing intermediate the said secur-' ing means being free for slight relative movement.

4. A shaft for golf clubs embodying a tubular non-metallic casing, a hollow metallic core telescoped into and fit-ting Within the casing, and means securing the ends of the core and casing together, the portions of the core and casing intermediate'the said securing means being free for slight relative rotary movement.

5. A shaft for golf clubs embodying a tapering tubular non-metallic casing, a. tapering core telescoped into and fitting wit-hin the core, and (zo-operating means disposed at one end of the casing and core for securing the two together, the said means adapted to impart a relative longitudinal movement to the casing and core.

6.-A shaft for golf clubs embodying a tapering tubular non-metallic casing, a tapering core telescoped into and fitting Within the core, a head secured to the said easing and into which head the casing and core telescope, and co-operating` means disposed at one end of the casing andcore and housed Within the head for securing the casing and core together, the said means adapted to impart a relative longitudinal movement to the casing and core.

7. A shaft for golf clubs embodying a tapering tubular non-metallic casing, a hollon7 metallic tapering core telescoped into and litting Within the core, and co-operating means disposed atone end of the casing and core for securing the two together, the said means adapted to impart a relative longitudinal movement to the casing and core.

8. A shaft for golf clubs embodying a. tapering tubular non-metallic casing, a hollowr metallic tapering core telescoped into and fitting Within the core, a. head secured to the said casing and into Which head the casing and core telescope, and co-operating means disposed at one end of the casing and core and housed Within the head for securing the casing and core together, the said means adapted to impart a relative longitudinal movement to the casing and core.

9. A shaft for golf clubs embodying a tubular tapering non-metallic casing', a tapering core tclescoped into and fitting within the casing, means securing the extremities of` the casing and core together, the portion of the core intermediate t-he said securing means being free for slight relative movement, and a head into which one end of the casing and core telescope, the last recited end of the said casing being secured to said head.

l0. A shaft for golf clubs embodying a tubular tapering non-metallic casing, a. hollow metallic tapering core telescoped into and fitting Within the casing, means securing the extremities of the casing and core together, the portion of the core intermediate the said securing means being free for slight relative movement, and a head into which one end of the ycasing and core telescope, the last recited end of t-he said casing being secured to said head.

4In testimony whereof I havel signed my name to this specification, on this 4th day of November, A. D. 1925.

HAROLD G. BARRETT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3819181 *Sep 18, 1972Jun 25, 1974T MillsHosel-less wood type golf club
US4995609 *Apr 10, 1989Feb 26, 1991Callaway Golf CompanyIron golf club heads
US5067711 *Aug 31, 1990Nov 26, 1991Callaway Golf CompanyIron golf club heads
US5181720 *Dec 12, 1991Jan 26, 1993Head Sports, Inc.Golf club construction
US5222734 *Nov 22, 1991Jun 29, 1993Callaway Golf CompanyIron golf club heads
US5320347 *Apr 5, 1993Jun 14, 1994Callaway Golf CompanyIron golf club heads
US5540435 *Sep 22, 1992Jul 30, 1996Kawasaki; JiroGolf clubs
US5820482 *Apr 30, 1996Oct 13, 1998Acushnet CompanyGolf putter shaft attachment
US5941781 *Mar 4, 1998Aug 24, 1999Acushnet CompanyGolf putter shaft attachment
US7621821 *Apr 3, 2008Nov 24, 2009Advanced International Multitech Co., Ltd.Golf club interchanging connection structure (I)
US8449404Nov 23, 2011May 28, 2013Nike, Inc.Releasable and interchangeable connections for golf club heads and shafts
US20110111881 *Nov 11, 2010May 12, 2011Nike, Inc.Releasable And Interchangeable Connections For Golf Club Heads And Shafts
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/312, 473/306
International ClassificationA63B53/02
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/02
European ClassificationA63B53/02