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Publication numberUS1690696 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1928
Filing dateFeb 10, 1927
Priority dateFeb 10, 1927
Publication numberUS 1690696 A, US 1690696A, US-A-1690696, US1690696 A, US1690696A
InventorsNorwood Harry G
Original AssigneeA D T Libby
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rubber heel
US 1690696 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1928. 1,690,696

H- G. NQRWOOD RUBBER HEEL Filed Feb. 10, 1927 IN VENTOR HARRY 6 N01? W000 grjfw A TTURNEV f Patented Nova. 6, 1928.

u -iiau stares a: e. nonwoon or narrmonn. MARYLAND, assrenon re A.

. NEWARK, NEW masnr.

PATENT orrics.

n. r. LIBBY, or

anemia HEEL.

Application filed February 10, 1827. Serial No. 167,847.

This invention. relates to a resilient heel, for use on boots, shoes and the like. r

In the past many designs of resilient or rubber heels have been proposed, but my present.

invention is directed more to an entirely new design, rather than to improvements on the prior art designs, and the advantages of my present invention may be briefly set forthas follows.

The resilient heel disclosed herein is, directed to one in which a combination of arches have bases which coact to sustain'the adjacent arch or arches, whereby much greater resilience is obtained than in other heels which have been proposed.

' The construction is such that the amount of material used in making the heel is materially reduced, in some cases as much as half. Another object of my invention-is to provide a construction by which the outer cavities produced by the arches act to prevent slipping or skidding to a high degree and due to the arch construction, greater resilience is obtained,'and the wear on the heel is reduced to a minimum.

Referring to the drawing, Figure 1 is a plan view of the bottom of the heel, while Figure 2 is a longitudinal section through the heel. The heel comprises a rim portion 1, having the edge 2 adapted'to 'fit closely againstthe heel lift of the boot or shoe. The heel is provided with the usual holes 3 for nailing the heel to the shoe lift. 4 is the usual metal Washer which acts to limit the driving of the nail onto the lift. Preferably around the hole 3 is a series of slight corrugations 8 which add to the appearance of the heel.

Between the confines of the rim-1, the heel is constructed of a plurality of arches, two being illustrated, the central arch 5 is surrounded by an annular arch 6, the arches having a common abutment 7, which preferably engages the lift of the shoe, when the heel'is put in position thereon.

It will be noted that the arches 5 and 6 are very much thinner than the rim 1, and due to this thinness of the wall and the arch construction, the amount of rubber required in the heel is materially reduced. By making the arches 5 and 6 re atively thin, greater resilience is obtained, yet it will be seen from a study of the drawing sure is applied to e1ther of the arches, the strains applied thereto are conveyed through the common abutment 7 to the other arch or arches so that the equilibrium of the arches is maintained and greater resilience results.

The annular cavity 9 formed on the outer surthat in use when 'presarch and an annular arch between the rim and V the central arch, said central arch being proportioned'so as to have somewhat more resilience than the outer arch.

2. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift and a plurality of arched portions concentrically arranged and. which coact to transmit the applied pressures from one arch to the other.

3. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift, a central arch and an annu-' lar'arch between the central arch and the rim, said central arch being of considerable length and breadth relative to said annular arch.

4. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift, and a plurality of arched portions concentrically arranged and having abutments on theheel lift.

5. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift, a central arch and an annular arch between the rim and the central arch, said arches having a thickness materially less than the thickness of the rim portion.

6. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift, a centralarch and an annular arch between the rim and the central arch, said central arch having a common abutment with the annular arch.

7. In a flexible heel having a rim to fit the heel lift, means for securing great resilience, and non-skidding characteristics, comprising a plurality of spaced concentric arches forming outer surface suction areas therebetwe'en,

said arches having a thickness of section materially less than the rim.

8. In a flexible heel having a rim to fit the heel lift, means for securing great resilience,

5 and non=skidding characteristics, and minimum of weight comprising, a central arched portion and an annular arched portion having a common abutment with the central arch a ainst the heel lift, the outer convex surface 0 said arches forming an annular suction ring while said arches are of much less thickness than the rim.

In testimony whereof, I afiix my signatui HARRY G. NORWOOD.

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US7063336Feb 18, 2003Jun 20, 2006Heeling Sports LimitedExternal wheeled heeling apparatus and method
US7165773Dec 22, 2005Jan 23, 2007Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus and method
US7165774Jun 19, 2006Jan 23, 2007Heeling Sports LimitedExternal wheeled heeling apparatus and method
US7610972Aug 4, 2005Nov 3, 2009Heeling Sports LimitedMotorized transportation apparatus and method
US7621540Jan 22, 2007Nov 24, 2009Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus and method
US8480095Nov 23, 2009Jul 9, 2013Heeling Sports LimitedHeeling apparatus wheel assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/35.00B
International ClassificationA43B21/06, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/06
European ClassificationA43B21/06