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Publication numberUS1692225 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 20, 1928
Filing dateJul 23, 1927
Priority dateJul 23, 1927
Publication numberUS 1692225 A, US 1692225A, US-A-1692225, US1692225 A, US1692225A
InventorsRoberts Gladys M
Original AssigneeRoberts Gladys M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toe end
US 1692225 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 20, 1928. 1,692,225

G. M. ROBERTS TOE END Filed July 25, 1927 @Hays M. Robrfs Patented Nov. 20, 1928.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

GLADYS M. ROBERTS, or sT. PAUL, MINNESOTA.

TOE END.

Application filed July 23, 1927. Serial No 208,386.

My invention relates to toe ends for danc ing shoes and particularly to dancing shoes used in the art of toe dancing.

An object of the invention resides in providing a pad or toe end adaptedvto be at-V tached to the toe of a dancing slipper so as to prevent the material covering the slipper y posed between the same a suitable cushion to form a pad upon the end of the shoe.

`With the foregoing and other objects in view, which will appear in the following description, the invention resides in the novel combination and arrangement of parts and 'in the details of construction hereinafter described and claimed.

In the drawings Fig. 1 is a side elevational View of a dancing shoe provided with my improved toe end.

Fig. 2 is a plan view of one of the toe ends, illustrating the form and appearance of the same.

Fig. 3 is a transverse sectional viewy illush trating diagrammatically one of the toe ends having the double thickness of materialand showing the attachment of the two discs as being united along their marginal portions.

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 illustrating the toe end with the cushion lmember disposed between the two discs.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary View illustrating a manner in which my improved toe end may be formed.

In the profession of toe dancing, considerable wear occurs upon the toe of the dancing shoe or slipper due to the fact that the entire weight of the dancer is carried byr a small surface directly in contact with the dancing floor. The covering of the shoe which comes in contact with the floor, is quickly worn out, frequently requiring dancers to replacetheir shoes after having worn them on but few occasions. My invention overcomes this difficulty by providing a pad adapted to be sewed or otherwise secured to the toe of a dancing slipper so as toprotect the covering of the shoe and prevent the same from Wearing out. At the same time my invention prevents the dancer from accidentally slipping and serves to cushion the end of the shoe so as to render the shoes more durable and more comfortable to the wearer.

For the purpose of illustrating the application of my invention, I have shown in Fig. 1, a dancing slipper A of the conventional type, which may be constructed in accordance with any desired last and comprises a sole 10 having t-he usual uppers l1 Secured thereto. A boX 12 is formed at the toe end of the slipper and is attached to the 'sole 10, while the entire shoe is covered with a suitable covering13 which may be silk, satin, leather, or any other suitable material such as is now in common use for such foot-Wear. In conjunction with the uppers-11, a drawstring 14 is employed, which is used to hold the slipper firmly in place upon the foot of the wearer.'

vThe eXtreme end of the boX 12 of the shoe A is usually constructed with a convex portion 15 adapted to come in contact with the dancing floor. This end of the shoe, as will be noted, presents a relatively small area which comes in contact with the floor and ordinarily causes the cover13 thereon to become readily worn. Although I have described the particular shoe illustrated in some detail, yet it can readily be comprehended that the invention may be applied to yand used with any type of dancing shoe or slipper.

The toe end comprising the invention properv and indicated in its entirety at B in Figs. 2 and 3, consists of two circular discs 16 and 17 which are united together along their marginal portions as indicated at 18. These discs are preferably constructed by crocheting and are formed with a plurality of spirally arranged ridges19 of a sort of beaded shape which are adapted to come in contact with the dancing floor while the slipper is in use. These ridges serve to partially cushion the end of the dancing shoes and at the same time prevent the shoes from slipping during the performance. v If desired, the disc 17 may be constructed of other material than that forming the disc 16 although I have found that when both discs are crocheted that the cushioning effect is more pronounced and that the same may be more readily connected together along their margins.

The crocheted discs 16 and 17 may be constructed as follows: Referring to Fig. 5, a loop having a slip-knot is first made upon the end of the crochet thread and 'a number ofV Yio stitches ordinarily known in the art of crochet as single crochet, taken about said loop. The end of the. thread is then drawn through the slip-knot to close in the loop and bring the stitches in close relation to one an` rope-like selvage on the work, connecting the various cross threads 23. lt will be further noted that between the various cross threads 23 and the loops 22, holes or eyes 2/1 are formed of which the last hole after the linished row shown in the drawing is indicated at 25. In making the stitch, the cr chet hook v26 remains in the i'inal loop 27 of the last row of the work. The hook is first inserted from thetop of the work through the hole or eye 25 so as to catch both of the loops 21 and 22. The thread is then thrown over the hook, or in other words, the hook inserted between the forefinger and the thread so as to cause same to engage the hook portion thereof. 'The thread is then drawn back through the eye or hole 25 so as to form a second loop 28 on the hook without pulling the said second loop through the loop 27. This leaves the crochet hook 26 free from thev work with the two loops 27 and 28 on it.' The thread is next thrown over the hook again as indicated at 29 in the drawing, and the saine` pulled through both of the loops 28 and 27. This leaves a single loop upon the end of the hook which corresponds to and takes the place of the loop 27 in the next stitch. This completes 'the stitch, after which the various stitches are duplicated, commencing with the new loop thus formed in place of the loop 27 and operating the successive `eyes or holes 24 as the work progresses. To maintain a planiform shape in the disc, at suitable intervals two stitches are taken in the same eye so that the succeeding rows as the work becomes larger, increase in length. It is to be noted that the stitches are taken about both of the loops 21 and 22 of the work which eliminates the usual running stitch frequentlyA found in crochet work and gives a larger core for the respective rows. When the threads are pulled tightly, each of the various rows .of the work take the appearance of a roll or ridge which gives the appearance of a roll or ridge which gives the appearance of groups of ridges when the disc is completed. These ridges serve to prolongthe life of the pad or toe end and also serve to cushion the shoe and to prevent `the same fromslipping. Were the it not for the fact that the needle is inserted beneath both of the loops 21 and 22 instead of beneath the outer loop 21 only, thecrochetingV would become loose and the remaining loop 22-would fill the cre-vice between the 7 two rows and cause the pad to have a substantially flat even surface, However, by including both of the loops. as before stated, the desired rounded or padded effect is given to the individual rows, which causes the pad to function in the desired manner. v

For securing the disks together at 'their margins when the samev are constructed by crocheting as above outlined, the two disks are made of diameters slightly less than that desired, and placed face to face. The crochet thread on one of the disks is left intact and the crocheting continued, inserting the hook each timethrough both of the loops 21 and 22 of both of the disks. This provides a single row of stitches which unites `the two disks, which row is slightly larger in diam eter than the rows of either of the disks due to the four threads in the core,'bnt makes the, construction slightly less in diameter than the double thickness of the remainder of the toe end. By adding one or more ordinary rows of the same stitch to the row uniting vthe two disks, the toe end can be made to gradually decrease in thickness towards the margin so that when the same is applied tothe shoe the same will lie smooth and flat upon the surface thereof without appearing bulky or otherwise disliguring the shoe.'

yTf desired', a suitable filler of some soft elastic material such as wool, cotton or some other substance may loe inserted betweenthe two discs 16 and 17 as indicated at 30 in Fig. 4L. This serves to further cushion the toe of the shoe and causes the shoe to be particiu larly comfortable to the wearer, duringk performance.` f

In the form` of toe end shown in Fig. 4r, the spiral'ly related beads or ridges inthe lower disc serving to keep the padding'O. from crawling and bnnching up between the two discs.

If desired, the discs 16and 17 may be con-v structed slightly smaller than required and several. additional rows of crocheting formed on the work after the two discs have been united. This causes the pad to become thinner along its edges and prevents the same from appearing bulky when attached to the, shoe proper. The toe ends or pads may be secured to the shoeby stitching or otherwise, as desired. Y i

The advantages of my invention are mani# fest. A simple and successful device is prof vided for preventingthe excessive wear to dancing slippers used fortoe dancing, which at the same time cushions the shoe and makes the same more comfortable to the: wearer. The toe ends may be constructed in accord+ ance with my invention at a nominal cost lll) and may be readily removed and replaced as the same become worn or otherwise rendered unsatisfactory for use.

Changes in the specific form of my invention as herein disclosed, may be made within the scope of what is claimed without departing from the spirit of my invention.

Having described my invention what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

l. In combination with the convex t-oe of a dancing shoe, a ad secured thereto, said pad consisting of spirally arranged rows of ma.- terial interconnected at suitable intervals to allow the same to flex so as to cause the pad to adjust itself to the convex form of said shoe toe.

2. A toe end for dancing shoes comprising a circular pad, said pad consisting of a spirally arranged bead-like member connected together at frequent intervals throughout its length, each portion of said bead-like member being movable relative to the adjacent portion to permit said pad toflex and assume a convex form.

3. A toe end fo-r dancing shoes comprising a circular pad formed with crocheting of a closely drawn nature, said crocheting being formed around a central loop and being progressively spiraled about said loop toy form a plurality of substantially concentrically arranged ridges on the wearing surface of said pad.

4. A toe end for dancing shoes comprising a circular pad formed with crocheting of a closely drawn nature, said crocheting being formed around a central loop and being progressively spiraled about said loop to form a plurality of substantially concentrically arranged ridges on the wearing surface of said pad, said crocheting consisting of stitches ordinarily known as single crochet, successively taken through both of the loops of the marginal portion of the preceding row.

5. A toe end for dancing shoes comprising a pair of discs, said discs being secured together near the marginal portions thereof and a cushion disposed between said discs.

6. A toe end for dancing shoes comprising a pair of crocheted circular discs having a row of crocheting uniting the same along the marginal portions thereof.

7. A toe end for dancing shoes comprising a pair of crocheted circular discs having a` row of crocheting uniting the same along the marginal portions thereof, and a cushion disposed between said discs.

v8. `A toe end for dancing shoes comprising a pair of crocheted circular discs having a row of crocheting uniting the same along the marginal portions thereof, and a second row of crocheting united to said row connecting said two discs. y 9. A toe end for dancing shoes comprising a pad having a spiraliform ridge on the wearing surface thereof starting at the center of the pad and extending outwardly therefrom, the turns of the ridge being closely adjacent to each other.

10. A toe end for dancing shoes comprising a pad having a spiraliform. ridge on the wearing surface thereof starting at the center of the pad and extending outwardly therefrom.

ll. A toe end for dancing shoes comprising two disc-like members joined at the margins thereof and having insert-ed between them a padding material, the inner surface 4of the inner member being formed with substantially concentric ribs serving to keep the padding material from creeping and bunching between said members.

12. A toe end for dancing shoes comprising a pad, said pad consisting of a series of rows of bead-like members connected together at frequent intervals throughout their length, adjacent portions of said bead-like members being movable relative to one another to permit said pad to Hex out of the normal surface of said pad.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature.

GLADYS M. ROBERTS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7900375 *Jan 28, 2008Mar 8, 2011Michael ThoravalBallet pointe shoes
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/8.3, 36/113, 36/77.00R, 36/72.00R
International ClassificationA43B5/00, A43B5/12
Cooperative ClassificationA43B5/12
European ClassificationA43B5/12