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Publication numberUS1693435 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 27, 1928
Filing dateMar 10, 1927
Priority dateMar 10, 1927
Publication numberUS 1693435 A, US 1693435A, US-A-1693435, US1693435 A, US1693435A
InventorsThomas J Clarke
Original AssigneeThomas J Clarke
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Powder box
US 1693435 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T. J. CLARKE Nov. 27, 1928.

POWDER BOX Filed March lO, 192'? "Illa witness j Wme.

Patented lNov. 27, 1928.

amas,

y :POWDER Box.

Application led March 10, 1927. Serial No. 174,2554

Theinventi'on relates to improvements in boxes whose primary use is for packaging face powder, and such invention deals with a known type of box, which embodies an inner container which is filled with they owder and is then housed within co-opera le top and bottom sections of the box. Inner vcontainers -of this character are commonly formed with a bottom of paper and cardboard and are provided with a top having a4 comparatively large opening through which the container 4may b-e filled with powder. Aftery this filling operation, the bottomsection of the box is inverted and applied Vto what is then the upper portion of the lled container, the two being I, glued together.

p Then, when the article as so far completed is inverted, the 'top section of the box is applied. In this condition, the box of powder is marketed, and upon removing the top section of lthe box,lthe paper and cardboard which previously formed the bottom of the inner container, areaccessible, so that they, can be removed to give .access to thepowder. Boxes of the type above defined, have a very extensive use and are very desirable, but they are rather expensive/to manufacture and quite an amount o f material yis necessarily cut out and wasted. Moreover, dierent purchasers of these boxes from the factory, require them in dierent sizes and with different sized openings in the tops of the inner containers and hence, a number of expensive dies must bekept on hand, to form these openings and toI otherwise cu't the blanks fromwhichthe. inner container is constructed.

Then too, in forming the side and end walls and the top of the inner container,it is customary to make use of a single cardboard blank, with the above mentioned opening cut from its central portion and with right angular notches cut in'its corner portions, the parts of the blank between the notches being bent to form the side and end 'walls of the container. Thismanner of construction wastes the material cut from the corners of the blank and that cut from its central por. tion to form the opening. Moreover, when the container embodies these `details of construction, it is prone to leak at the corners, I permitting the powder to sift out.

Itis theprinoipal object of the present inventionto providea new andimpro-ved construction for therinner container, 'which is such as to minimize loss pf material'bv cutting, does not require special dies in order to Aform the filling opening in the top of the container, readily permits of assemblage by machine operations, and will be proof against leakage. i

Vith the foregoing in view, the invention resides in t-he novel subject matter hereinafter described andclaimed, the description being supplemented by the accompanying drawing.

Fig. 1 is a disassembled perspective view of the several parts from which the inner containeris constructed.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the inner container completely assembled.

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional View on line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view through a complete box embodying my improvements.

Fig. 5 is an elevation of the strip from which the outer frame of the inner container and top-forming flaps for said container, are formed.

In the drawing above briefly described, the numeral 6 designates an inner rectangular frame preferably bent from a'single strip of cardboard to form o posed side and end walls 7 and 8, the ends of the strip being secured together by thinning one of them and gluing litto the other strip vend, as indicated at 9.

By forming the frame 6in this manner, there is no danger of powder leakage at the corners thereof and its construction will also be simple, easy and inexpensive.

Preferably, a piece of cardboard 10 rests against the lower edge of the frame 6 to assist in forming a strong bottomtherefor, and a Y sheet of paper 11 extends under this cardboard 10, being cut so as toprovide it with four integral flaps 12. These flaps extend upwardly against the outer faces of the side and end walls 7 and 8 and have their upper portions bent inwardly as at 13, over the uph `per edges of said walls. l

d An outer rectangular frame 14 snugly surrounds the frame 6 and th'e flaps 12, said frame comprising opposed side and end walls 15 and 16 connected at the corners of the frame and provided at their upper edges with integral iaps 17, these flaps being turned inwardly and lying upon the inturned portions 13 of the iaps 12. These fiaps jointly form `a top for the inner container and they vare preferably of such width astoleave a central opening 18 of desired size, through which the container may be filled with powder, said opening being usuall of a size to Excellent results have been obtained from accommodate an outlet nozz e of a well known form of box-filling machine "In constructing the outer frame 14, I make use of a single cardboard vstrip such as that shown in Fig. 5. At spaced points, this strip has notches 19 formed in one of its edges,` to define the ends of the flaps 17, and these'I notches may be formed by arl-ordinary corner-cutting machine, instead of requiring that specially constructed dies be formed, to cut the strip in the desired shape. The strip is transversely scored at the notches 19, as indicated at 20, defining the ends of the side and end walls 15 and 16, and said stripI is longitudinally scored at 21, from each notch 19 to the next notch, thereby defining the upper y edges of said walls. vBy bending the strip upon the scored lines 2 0, and suitably connecting its ends, the outer frame 14 is formed with the flapsv 17 then projecting upwardly. Preferably, a thin strip of paper 22 is glued around the frame 14 to hold the strip ends together and to give a more finished appearance to this portion of the frame, which later is exposed when the complete box is opened.

With the frame 14 standing as seen in Fig. 1, the lpaper sheet 11, the'piece of cardboard 10, and the inner frame 6, may be forced into it from above, by machine operations, said inner frame 6 serving to downwardly move the cardboard 10 and the paper l1 into the frame 14. During this operation, the iaps 12 will obviously beI upwardly folded between the walls of the inner and outer frames and they w 1ll projectl above these frames at the inner sides of the fiaps 17. Thus, when these 4flaps are folded over to jointly form a top for the inner receptacle, the projecting portions of the flaps 12 will be similarly folded/ as indicated at 13 in Fig. 3, so that'there is no danger of the iiaps 12 pull'inof out from engagement with the innerandb outer frames, although not glued thereto.

The inner container as above described, is filled through the opening 18, while it stands as seen in Figs. 2 and 3. After filling, the bot-V tom section B of an outside box is inverted and slipped onto jthe upper portion of the filled receptacle, as indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 8, said bottom section .being glued either to the flaps 17 orto theside and end -walls of the outer frame A14. Now, the entire filled assemblage is inverted and the top rsecf tion T of the outside box is slipped over the l portion of the frame 14 projecting beyond the bottom section B. Inlthis condition, the package is marketed.

. When a purchaser of a box of the powder, l

wishes to open the saine, she-removes the top T, tears or cuts the paper 11 andI removes the cardboard 10, thus gilving access `to the powder. l

Leest/itatl is invited to the fact that-while the flaps 17 are preferably of such proportions as to leave the opening 18, they might in some instances bewider so as to form a complete top for the inner receptacle, provided with nol opening. With this construct-ion, it' would of course 4be necessary to ll the containerwith the pow/der while the flaps stood upright, folding said flaps inwardly, into co-operative relation, after filling.`

Icl'aim:'-

l. In a powder box, an inner container comprising an inner frame consisting of opposed side and end` walls connected` in a powder-tight manner at the corners of the frame, an easily rendible top sheet extend-V ing over said frame and having integral iaps which extend downwardly against the outer faces-of said side and end walls, and an outer frame surrounding said inner framfe 'andy flaps, said`o'uter'frame consisting of opposed side and end walls connected at the corners of the frame and having integral flaps at vunder the lower edge o f the inner frame and project horizontally inward from said inner frame; and an outer container snugly receiving said inner container, said outer container having a fixed bottom section co-operable with said horizontal iiaps in forming the box bottom, and a removable covergiving access to said easily rendible top sheet. i

2. In a powder box, an inner container their lower edges which are turned inwardly I comprising an -inner frame consisting of opposedside and end walls connected in a powder-tight manner at the corners of tlief rame, an easily rendible topsheet extendf ing over said frame and having integral flaps which extend downwardly against the outer faces of said side and end walls, are turned inwardly'under said walls and project horizontally inward from the latter, and an outer frame surrounding said inner frame and aps, said outer frame consisting of opposed `s'idefand end walls connected at the corners of the frame and having' integral flaps at their lower edgesl which are turned inwardly and lie horizontally under thev aforesaid inwardly turnedportions` of'said flaps of the topI sheet; andv an outer'container snugly re' ceiving said inner container, said outer container-having a lower section co-operahle 4with saidjfiaps in forming the box bottom,

and a removable cover section to said easilylrendible top shee In vtestimony whereof .I have hereunto' affixed my signature'.l f i THOMAS J. CLARKE. 'Y

giving access

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2741223 *Aug 18, 1952Apr 10, 1956Winborn Jr Byron RAnimal commode
US3142431 *Jul 18, 1961Jul 28, 1964E S & A Robinson Holdings LtdBoxes made of coated sheet material
US4850527 *Aug 3, 1988Jul 25, 1989Heil-Quaker CorporationCarton with self positioning interlocking corners
US4950216 *Sep 26, 1988Aug 21, 1990Highland Supply CorporationMethod of forming a flower pot
US5007229 *Jun 20, 1989Apr 16, 1991Highland Supply CorporationMethod of wrapping utilizing a self adhering wrapping material
US5029412 *Aug 22, 1989Jul 9, 1991Highland Supply CorporationFlower pot or flower pot cover with pleated skirt and or base
US5038933 *Jun 2, 1989Aug 13, 1991Highland Supply CorporationWrapping material for providing a decorative covering
US5076874 *Sep 15, 1989Dec 31, 1991Highland Supply CorporationProcess for forming a paper, burlap or cloth flower pot cover
US5077937 *Sep 8, 1989Jan 7, 1992Highland Supply CorporationApparatus for providing a decorative cover for a flower pot using a collar
US5085003 *Nov 13, 1989Feb 4, 1992Highland Supply CorporationPlant cover/wrap system
US5111613 *Jun 15, 1989May 12, 1992Highland Supply CorporationPleated flower pot or flower pot cover
US5120382 *Nov 30, 1990Jun 9, 1992Highland Supply CorporationProcess for forming a paper, burlap or cloth flower pot cover
US5129182 *Sep 11, 1989Jul 14, 1992Highland Supply CorporationFlower pot accessory
US5184390 *May 27, 1992Feb 9, 1993Highland Supply CorporationMethod of shaping and holding a sheet of material about a flower pot with a collar
US5228934 *Jul 30, 1991Jul 20, 1993Highland Supply CorporationMethod of forming a flower pot or flower pot cover with controlled pleats
US5259106 *Sep 1, 1992Nov 9, 1993Highland Supply CorporationMethod of making a flower pot or flower pot cover with pleated skirt
US5274900 *Dec 3, 1992Jan 4, 1994Highland Supply CorporationMethod of shaping and holding a sheet of material about a flower pot with a collar
US5303506 *Oct 13, 1992Apr 19, 1994Highland Supply CorporationBasket flower pot with decorative cover
US5327635 *Apr 14, 1993Jul 12, 1994Highland Supply CorporationMethod of making a flower pot or flower pot cover with pleated skirt
US5349739 *Oct 8, 1992Sep 27, 1994Highland Supply CorporationFlower pot accessory
US5402601 *Feb 4, 1991Apr 4, 1995Highland Supply CorporationCover/wrap system
US5501039 *Jul 26, 1994Mar 26, 1996Highland Supply CorporationMethod of forming a flower pot or flower pot cover with controlled pleats
US5654049 *Dec 22, 1994Aug 5, 1997Southpac Trust International, Inc.Self adhering wrapping material
US6131332 *Dec 11, 1997Oct 17, 2000Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant cover/wrap system
US6321486Dec 17, 1999Nov 27, 2001Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant wrapper
US6374540Feb 15, 2000Apr 23, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant cover/wrap system
US6449900Jul 20, 2001Sep 17, 2002Southpac Trust International, Inc.Plant wrapper
US6640492Sep 9, 2002Nov 4, 2003Southpac Trust International, Inc.Flower pot wrapper
US6823625Aug 13, 2003Nov 30, 2004The Family Trust U/T/AFlower pot wrapper
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/122.2, 229/122.33, 206/823, 229/122.32
International ClassificationA45D33/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S206/823, A45D33/00
European ClassificationA45D33/00