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Publication numberUS1693730 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1928
Filing dateJul 17, 1926
Priority dateNov 16, 1925
Publication numberUS 1693730 A, US 1693730A, US-A-1693730, US1693730 A, US1693730A
InventorsChristian Schroder Hans Wilhel
Original AssigneeElfriede Drager
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Breathing apparatus particularly for administering anesthetics
US 1693730 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 4, 1928.

H. w. c..scHR6DER BREATHING APPARATUS PARTICULARLY FOR ADMINISTERING ANESTHBTIGS Filed July 17, 1926 v HTTOIEWEKS' Patented Dec. 4, 192 8.

UNITED HANS WILHELM CHRISTIAN scHRoDER, or Lassen; GERMANY, ASSIGNOR'TO ALEX- ANDER BERNHARDDRAGER, or LUBECK, GERMANY; STANGE, EXECUTRIX or SAID DRKGER, DEcEAsED.

v ELFRIEIDE DRliGER, NICJE BREATHING APPARATUS PARTICULARLY FOR ADMINISTERING ANESTHETICS.

Application filed July 17, 1926, Serial No. 123,125, and in Germany November 16, 192-5.

Apparatus operating by compressed gas are known in 'whicha liquid anaestheticis sprayed or evaporated to a regulatable amount that is administered to the patient together with the working gas for inhaling. The physician who attends the patient, it is true, knows what quantities ofthe liquid by Weight are inhaled within a certain time, but, henever knows what effect such quantities of liquid have in comparison to the amount of air inhaled at the same time; because thepatient beside the working gas (compressed air or oxygen) necessary for spraying also inhales atmospheric air to a far'greater amountthrough an opening in the breathing mask. According to the depth 1 and frequency of breathing the amount of atmospheric air varies, and therefore also the concentration of the inhaled vapors varies correspondingly. It therefore has occurred that a large quantity of liquid administered was less effective than a small quantity, and moreover there was the possibility that the physician had a quite erroneous conception with regard to the patients susceptibility to the anaesthetic.

A clear judgment and comparison with regard to the effect of inhaled substancesc'an' only be gained if the degreeof dilution with the air of the vapors is known and can be taken into account.

The invention overcomes these difficulties by admixing a regulatable quantity of air corresponding to the depth of breathing with the vapors of the anaesthetic, in addition to the predetermined or fixed amount of compressed gas to be sprayed.

In the drawing the apparatusis shown in sectional elevation. U

Compressed air or compressed oxygen is supplied by the pipe a, the end of which has a nozzle b projecting into a casing c opposite the suction nozzle f forming part of the injector f. By the compressed air or oxygen passing from the nozzle b into the nozzle f a vacuum or a partial vacuum will be created within the casing 0 adapted to draw medicine or anaesthetic from a glass 6 or other vessel connected with the upper part of the casing c by the piped. The medicine or anaesthetic will enter the casing 0 by the v pipe d in drops, which fall into the space between the two nozzles b and f, and will.

thusbe driven into the nozzle) in a fine spray. Between the injector f and the casing 0 there is a return pipe 9 and a cock ghaving a notched plug 9 According to the position of the plug the return pipe 9 Will be more or less throt'tled, and thus a more or less artial vacuum and a more or less frequent alling down oft-he drops within the casing 0 results. For spraying the largest amount of liquids only a very small amount of comv pressed air is required, which'will be sufficient for filling the lungs on slow breathing. The deficiency of air is supplied or supplemented by atmospheric air being drawn in by the injector nozzle 7L and the shut-off or throttling member 2'. The compressed gas passing the nozzles b and h is a determined amount and the amount of outer air sucked in may be read off from a dial according to the position of the shut-off member 2'. From the proportionof the amount of sprayed liquid and thetotal amount of air the concentration may be calculated. The amount of air inhaled by the patient-can be judged by the moderate distension of the bag In, which always ought to show a moderate distention. WVhen the mask 97?; fits snugly the patient produces therein a small vacuum and sucks gas from the bag by the pipe n and the non-return valve 0. valve 0 will be closed and the exhaled air escapes into the atmosphere by the'non-return valye p.

The shut-off or throttling member i may be of any well known construction; in the drawing it is shown as a cock.

The feeding of the additional air byaid of an injector operating by compressed gas In exhaling the as f is particularly a simple solution of the task. 7

For producing a regulatable stream of-air any other suitable source may be used.

I claim Breathing apparatus comprising a breath ing bag, a conduit for gas under pressure ing With said chamber, means for regulating the output of anaesthetic, a second conduit connected with said first mentioned conduit bypassing said injector and leading to said 5 breathing ba aninj ector in said second con duit, a charm er about said second injector,

said last mentioned chamber having a passage communicating with the atmosphere, and a valve in said passage for regulating the I amount of air injected.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to' this specification.

HANS WILHELM CHRISTIAN S CHRfiDER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2547458 *Jun 25, 1947Apr 3, 1951Stephenson CorpResuscitator
US2647511 *Nov 23, 1951Aug 4, 1953O E M CorpOxygen mask
US4865027 *Sep 27, 1988Sep 12, 1989The University Of MichiganNon-rebreathing collapsible chamber continuous aerosol delivery system with infusion port
US5586551 *Jul 17, 1995Dec 24, 1996Hilliard; Kenneth R.Oxygen mask with nebulizer
US5755221 *Oct 24, 1994May 26, 1998Bisgaard; HansAerosol inhaler with piston dump
US6463928 *Apr 6, 1999Oct 15, 2002Michael Irwin BuissonPediatric prepatory and induction anesthesia device
US7007693Feb 3, 2003Mar 7, 2006The Research Foundatilon Of State University Of New YorkDevice and method of reducing bias flow in oscillatory ventilators
US7367335Jun 30, 2003May 6, 2008The Research Foundation Of State University Of New YorkTherapeutic agent delivery device and method
WO2004002390A3 *Jun 30, 2003Apr 29, 2004Univ New York State Res FoundTherapeutic agent delivery device and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/203.13, 210/290, 128/200.21, 128/203.12, 128/203.29
International ClassificationA61M16/10, A61M16/18
Cooperative ClassificationA61M16/18
European ClassificationA61M16/18