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Publication numberUS1694514 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1928
Filing dateSep 9, 1924
Priority dateSep 9, 1924
Publication numberUS 1694514 A, US 1694514A, US-A-1694514, US1694514 A, US1694514A
InventorsNaugle Harry M, Townsend Arthur J
Original AssigneeColumbia Steel Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Floor joist
US 1694514 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 1l, 1928.

' 1,694,514 H. M. NAUGLE ET AL FLOOR JOIST 3 sheets-sheet Filed Sept. 9, 1924 FAES Il E" f3 IIIII", III

i IIIIIIII Dec.` 1l, 1.928. 1,694,514 H. M. NAUGLE ETAL FLOOR JOIST Filed Sept. 9, 1924 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 gmx@ Mmm.'

atmmgd Patented Dec. 11, 1928.

UNITI-:o STATES PATENT OFFICE.

HARRY E. NAAUGLE AND ARTHURa J'. TOWNSENID, OF CANTON,.OHIO, ASSIGNORS, BY HEBNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO THE COLUMBIA STEEL COMPANY, OF PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA, A. CORPORATION OFENNsLvANI.

rLoon 301er.

Application led September 9, 1924. Serial No. 736,879.

The invention relates to a trussed U-bar beam for use as floor joists, roof rafters and the like, and the object of the improvement vis to provide a 'cheap and simple structural member which can be made at a factor and distributed in complete form for use in ulldin construction.

e object of the improvement may be attained by combining an integral metal U-bar beam with at bar truss and strut members, and with a wooden strip filler in the channel for strengthening the U-bar'and receiving oor fastening means.

The invention is illustrated in the accom` panying drawings forming part hereof, in which Figure 1 is a plan view of a preferred form of the improved joist;

Fig. 2, a side elevation of thesame, showing supporting licor beams in sectlon;

Fig. 3, a longitudinal elevation sectlon of the same;

Fig. 4, a side` elevation-of the improved joist showing a modified form of strut member and ceiling supporting channels suspended from the joist;

Fig. 5, a side elevation of the lmproved joist showing two strut members; i t

Fig. 6, a cross section as on line 6 6, Figs. 2 and 3; f

Fig. 6, an enlarged' cross section of the wood filler U-bar as on line 6 6, Fig. 2;

Fig. 7, a cross section on line 7 7, Fig. 4;

Fig. 8, a cross section of a strut strip on line 8 8, Fi s. 2 and 3;

Fig. 9, a ragmentary perspective view of a floor containing the improved j oists.

Fig. 10, a side elevation of another form of the improved joist, showing the associated parts of a building;

Fig.. 11, a cross section on line 11 11, Fig. 10;

Fig. 12, an end view of the same formed 'oist T J Fig. 13, a fragmentary longitudinal section on line 13 13, Fig. 12;

Fig. 14, a cross section of a wood filled U-bar with edge reinforcing beads; and

Fig. 15, a cross section of a wood filled U-bar with edge reinforcing lianges.

Similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the drawings.

The integral metal U-bar 16, 16 or 16" may be made by rolling of any suitable metal, preferably high carbon steel; and for the purpose of the present invention the bars are. formed with a greater depth of ange 16 than width of wedge 16" so as to give increased beam strength thereto; the bar may be positioned with its web downward and its flanges upward so asto receive a wooden strip filler 17 within the recess of the bar, as shown in Figs. 1 to 9, inclusive.

As shown in Figs. 2, 6 and 9, the wood strip 17 may fill the entire recess of the Urbar, or as shown in Figs. 4 and 7, the woodstrip 17a may extend downward only part way into the recess to leave a space betweenthe wood filler and the bottom of the U-bar for bolt heads and the like.

When a wood strip is used as a filler, it is placed in the recess of the U-bar and the lianges thereof are rolled together so as to bodily clamp the strip by and between the ianges and to deflect the anges t0 converge toward each other from the web bottom of the bar toward the free edges of the fianges.

This construction and arrangement of the composite bar materially increases the strength of the U-bar as a beam, and also as a compression member. When the U-bar is used as a beam, the initial failure under a load is a lateral deflection of the upstanding flanges, and when these flanges are inclined upward and inward from normal' according to the present improvement, such a deflection is thereby directed inward; but the abutment formed by the wood filler strip between the flanges, prevents an inward deflection thereof, and thereby realizes the maximum compression strength of the metal in the fianges.

Furthermore, the clamping action of the 'anges on the sides of the wood filler holds the strip in endwise alignment, and adds to the U-bar the strength of the wood strip to resist endwise compression. To increase the adhesion of the wood strip to the metal flanges a thin coating of liquid cement may be interposed between them; and to stiffen the edges of the flanges, a reinforcing bead 17 or a reinforcing flange 17" may be provided, as shown in Figs. 14 and 15, respectively. y

The truss member 18, 18'* or 18" is made from a flat bar of steel, of a width to enter between the flanges of the U.-bar; and the end portions 18 of the flat bar may be folded around the ends of the web of the U-bar and extended inward a short distance upon the same, as shown in Fig. 3.

The truss bar is also preferably bent, as at 18, so that a portion 18" of each end of the strip of the flat bar will abut the underside of the end portion of the web of the U-bar; and the end portions of the truss bar which abuts the upper and lower sides of the U-bar may be secured thereto by spot welding or other suitable means.

The strut member 19 or 19" may be made from a flat bar of steel of substantially the same width as the truss bar; and as shown in Figs. 2, 3, 5 and 6, the strutbar may be provided with a longitudinal corrugation 19 for increasing its endwise compression strength.

Each strut bar may be provided 'with L- flanges 19" on its ends for abutting the underside of the U-bar and the upper side of the flat tru bar, to which the flanges may be secured by spot welding or the like.

The modified strut member 19 shown in Fig. 4, may comprise a tubular stem clamped between the U-bar and the truss bar, by a tie bolt 19W', and as shown in Fig. 5 two spaced truss members 19" may be interposed between a long span U-bar 16" and a corresponding truss bar 18".

The abutment of a portion of the ends of the flat truss bars against the underside of the web of the U-bar provides a long flat bearing, and the length of this bearing permits a reasonable range of variation in the distance between the floor beams, without changing the length of the joist; so that the improved joists can be kept in stock in standard lengths in the same or similar manner that wooden joists are usually cutand carried in stock lengths.

The substantial width of the U-bar, as compared with the depth thereof, gives a bearing of suflicient width upon the floor beam to render unnecessary the use of bridging means. Ceiling channel bars 20 may be suspended from the improved joist U-bars by means of depending metal strips 21 having their ends bent over and nailed to the wood filler stripin the U-bar, and having the lower ends engaged with the channel bar, or with the metal lath thereon, as shown in Figs. 4 and 7 In the form of joist shown `in Figs. 10 to 13 inclusive, the U-bar 16 positioned with kits web 16"/ upward and itsflanges 16- downward, for which arrangement the ends of the strut bars 19 abut the under side of the web between the flanges of the U-bar, and short lengths of channel bars 22 may engage the flanges at the ends of the U-bar, to form bearings for seating upon a wall support 23 or a beam support 23.

Expanded metal sheets 24 may be laid upon the web of the U-bars in this form of joists and a cement slab formed thereon, with wooden strips 17 laid upon the joists to which a wooden floor 24* may be nailed.

It will be understood that floor joists and other like structural members are required to carry the load of the floor throughout the length ofthe joist, and that the strains im posed upon the trussed U-bar of the present improvement includes not only the compression strains imposed by 'the truss bar, but also the load strains upon the bar as a beam, between the points of support at the end and strut bar bearings.

And it is evident that in either arrangement of the U-bar withits flanges turned upward or downward, the greater depth of the flanges as compared with `the less width of the web, gives. the'necessary beam strength for the use of the U-bar as a constituent member of the improved joist.

We claim:

1. A floor joist including an integral metal U-bar beam with flanges extending upward from the web, and a wood strip bodily clamped by and between the flanges of the U-bar.-

2. A floor joist including an integral metal U-bar beam with flanges extending upward from the web, and a wood strip bodily clamped b v and between the flanges of the U-bar, the flanges being inclined inward from the web bottom to the free edges of the flanges.

3. A floor joist including an integral metal U-bar beam with flanges extending upward from the web, a wood strip bodily clamped by and between the flanges of the U-bar, the flanges being inclined inward from the web bottom to the free edges of the flanges and reinforcing means with edges of the flanges.

4. A floor ioist including an integral U-bar beam with flanges extending upwardfrom the web, reinforcing means on the edges of the flanges, and structural means resisting downward deflection of the U-bar'.

5. A floor joist including an integral metal U-bar beam with flanges extending upward from the web, a wood strip inserted and bodily clamped by and between the flanges of the U-bar, a metal truss bar having its ends secured-to the ends of the U-bar, and one or more strut bars between the U-bar and the truss bar.

6. A floor joist including an integral U-bar beam with flanges extending upward from the Web, a Wood strip inserted and bodily the Web,a flat truss bar having its ends folded clamped by and between the flanges of the 10 over and upon the end portions of the U-bar, U-bar, and structural means resisting downone or more strut bars between the U-bar and Ward deection ofthe U-bar.

5 the truss bar, and means as spot Welding for 1n testimony that we claim the above, We

fastening the abutting parts towether. have hereunto subscribed our names.

7. A floor joist including an integral U-bar HARRY M. NAUGLE. v

beam with anges extending upward from yARTHUR J. TOWNSEND.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4144690 *Dec 19, 1977Mar 20, 1979Aluma Building Systems IncorporatedConcrete forming structures
US4503653 *Sep 30, 1982Mar 12, 1985Encon Products, Inc.Structural bracing system
US6892502Mar 27, 2003May 17, 2005David A. HubbellSpace frame support structure employing weld-free, single-cast structural connectors for highway signs
EP0114015A1 *Dec 20, 1983Jul 25, 1984LATAPPY, Pierre GuyLight-metal girders with increased moment of inertia, and method for their production
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/376, 52/690, 52/692, 52/691
International ClassificationE04C3/29, E04C3/292
Cooperative ClassificationE04C3/292
European ClassificationE04C3/292