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Publication numberUS1696537 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1928
Filing dateApr 13, 1927
Priority dateApr 13, 1927
Publication numberUS 1696537 A, US 1696537A, US-A-1696537, US1696537 A, US1696537A
InventorsKewish John T
Original AssigneeKewish John T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic firearm
US 1696537 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 25, 1928.

Filed April 15, 1927 6 Sheets- Sheet 1 m m5 m Q IN VEN TOR.

TTORNEYS.

Dec. 25, 1928. 1,6,3? J. T. KEWISH AUTOMATIC FIREARM Filed April 13, 1927 e Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR.

Dec. 25, 1928.

J. T. KEWISH AUTOMATIC FIREARM s Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed April 13, 1927 INVENTOR. Jo/m ZYI'cu/IJ/L M 5" ATY/ORNEYS.

By 7 .v I H15 'Dec. 25, 1928." 1,696,537 J. T. KEW|$H I A AUTOMATIC FIREARM Filed April 13; 1927 e Sheets-Sheet s avwemtoz John 7. lfe w/a/r Patented Dec; 1928i": I

UNITED! STATES PATENT OFFIQE.)

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' -au'roua'rrc FIREARM.

Application fled April 18,1927. Serial No. 183,890.- 7 w This invention relates to an improved firing-position with the firing pin .cockedf" 4 I automatic firearm of the type adapted to be Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view showcarried on and fired from the shoulder of, ing the actuator and'its associated parts in the user as an ordinary rifle. p si i n immediately after the firing of a. 5 The principal object of my invention is cartridge; .4 a to simplify the construction of automatic F1g. 4 is a plan view of a portion of the firearms in which the power for actuating gun with the cover removed showing the inthe automatic parts is derived from the tenor of the receiver, the trigger 'mecha primer of the cartridge and to provide a nlsm and a retaining member adapted to 10 light-weight, reliable and easily assembled h ld th cartridges in position in the firearm. g j' Another object of my invention is to pro- Flg- 5 1s a plan view of a rtion of the vide means for removably attaching the gun with thejcover remove showing thebarrel of the gun to the forward end of the a tuator in its forward position and show- 1 receiver and to provide means associated 3g the t l g retaining memberpositherewithto lubricate the cartridges while ijwned out of the ath of the actuator as the same are being inserted within the indlpatedun dotte lines; p b L 1 4 Fig. 6 1s a cross-sectional view taken on' Another object of my invention is to'prothe hn 0f Fig, v 2 vide means for reventing the primer from g- 7 15-91 os -s View taken coming complete y out of the cartridge when h 0f F g- 3-; i it i fi d, v a Fig; 8- 1s a cross-sectional -view' taken .on

Another object of my invention is to pro v hh H of Flg 3; 7 vide a cartrid e magazine of an improved g- 9v 8 a ro s-Sectional view takenon 25 construction whereby a relatively large numthe linedd of Fig 3; p

ber T cartridges may beheld within a comi F1 10 15 S-sectional view taken an t s 7 a the hue e- -e of Fig 1; a A .fiirther object of my invention is to 1 1s a cross-sectional View when on provide a trigger mechanism of simple conthe h f-ff of g 1; v 35 struction adapted to perform in addition to g- 1S 1 View: taken 011' the usual function of the trigger mechanism, th 'h g g 0f g-"1; 1 l Various other functions as will more clearly g 1S 0 1 v w taken on appear from the description set forth herethe 11119 0f 2," l i ft Q p Fig. 14 1s'a detailviewof the cocking as Another object of my invention is to promeahs fi mgpin; l vide means to enclose the actuating parts of lhls a cross-sectional viewtaken on the gun and to lock llhGIrl'flIl'POSltlOIl when e h H 0f g a gun i not i 0 ti I F1g.,1 6 1s a bottom; view of the actuator.

Further objects 0 my invention will be ap- -F g- 17 shows in perspective the 011 I'! c-' 4o parent from thedescriptionhereinafter-made. 51011 O the h01t, the p a h '67!" In particular, this invention relates to imr ctor and asprlng whic is associated with provements made by me over the'automatic the t ppet m n and which holds the ex firearm described inmy prior Patent No. t 'p mn; Q 1,563,751, dated December 1, 1925. V g 1 1 across-sectional, view of e 4s- A preferred "mbodiment of my invention f rw r end of the a or sh wing i n is shown in the accompanying drawings i g p on an w g i appe pi fanning a, part of this Specification in" associatedwlth the bolt contact with the whieh l primer of-the cartridge; v Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view of a F g- 19' i 'a c ectional view of th so portion of a gun embodying my invention forward end of'theactu'ator and-the bolt showing the actuator in its rear position and showmg' them in their"rearmost'lpositions a showing the interior'construction ofthecar while a fired cartridge is-bein ejected."

tridge magazine; v Fig; 20 isa cross-sectiona view 'of the 1 Fig, 2 is a vertical sectional view of a'porforward vpart of the bolt showing the face- -j11o .55 tion ofa gunembodying my invention showof the bolt recessed tQ" permit the insertion ing the actuator and its associated parts in "of the cartridge more readily;

I ing- Fig. 21 is a plan view of the forward end of the actuator showing it in position in I Fig. 22 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line of Fig. 12

Fig. 23 is a detail view of the means employed to recock the firing pin by hand;

Fig. 24 shows .in detail the means enrployed to remove the cartridge retaining member from the cartridges andthelocking means employed to hold the actuator in its rear position during the reloading of the gun;

Fig. ,25 shows in perspective, the sear, the hand recocking pinion, the ejector and the cam shaft upon which said parts are mounted;-

F ig. 26 is a perspective view of the locking means for cockingathe firing pin on the actuator; V

Fi 27 is a side elevation of the gun showow the operating mechanism is completely enclosed when the gun is not in use;

Fig. 28 is a perspective View of the spring .locking means associated with theyreceiver cover Fig. 29 shows the construction of the forward end of the receiver, the rear end of the barrel and the means employed for connecting the two removably together;

i 30 is a cross-sectional view taken on the hne 7ala of Fig. 29

Fig. 31 is a perspective view of the locking means shown inFig. 29;

.Fig; 32 is a vertical sectional view of a portion of the gun showing modified forms ,for n'of bolt showing the extractor and the spring for holding the extractor in position;

' Fig. 35 is a bottom view of the modified form of actuator with the bolt mounted upon theniodified form of firing pin showing the i lock associated with the firing pin, and

' the stock of agun embodying my invention" 'Fi 36 is a cross-sectional view taken on.

the lme L-L of Fig. .32.

In the drawings, the numeral 1 indicates upon which the receiver 2 is mounted and held in positionf'thereon by means of the stock-bolt-flgand the thumb screw 4. The stock 1 is madeintwo partsand the forward part which'extends beyond the front face of the receiver 2 carries the barrel 5.

The receiver Q'which is adapted to .sup'

port the actuating mechanisms -.of*thegun comprises a longitudinal member as shown in. the drawings having a central slot 6 ex tending substantially the length of the receiver. The trigger mechanism of the gun is located in the slotv 61 andfin slots made in the projections 7 which extend downward from the receiver as shown in the drawings. The receiver 2 is provided with depending portions 8 which'form supporting means for the magazine 9 as hereinafter described. The receiver 2 has cut therein longitudinal grooves 10 preferably in the form of a dove tail in which the receiver cover 11 is adapted to slide. Between the grooves 10 the receiver .2 is provided with bearing surfaces as indicated at 12 in Figs. 6-11on which the actuator 13 is free to reciprocate within the receiver .cover 11.

In guns of the type described herein it is desirable to provide a means whereby the barrel of the gun may be readily replaced by another barrel when it becomes too hot from constant firing or when incapable of further use for any other reason. To ac.- complish this purpose I employ the following construction more clearlyillustrated in Fig. 29. The forward end of the receiver 2 is provided with a preferably integral projection or boss 14 which is provided with external threads '14 and internal threads 15, which are partially stripped as shown. The end of the barrel 5 is provided with partially stripped threads 16 similar to the threads 15, whereby the barrel 5 may be readily inserted within the boss 14 andupon being rotated with respect thereto, will engage the threads 15 and be securely held in position thereby. j

A coupling member 17 is provided to removably connect the barrel 5 to the receiver 2 and to lock the same in position while the gunv is in operation. The coupling member 17 consists of a substantially cylindrical portion having a boss or handle portion 18 projecting therefrom as shown. The interior surface of the member 17 isprovided with.

screw threads 19 adapted to engage the threads 14' on the boss 14: These threads 19 are likewise partially stripped whereby the member 17 may be readilyplaced over the boss 14 and screwed into position. The

coupling member 17 is provided with two or more projecting pieces or lugs 20, preferably formed integral therewith, which are adapted to be placed in the slots 21 in the barrel 5, whereby a turning movement of the coupling member 17 will be transferred to the barrel 5. When it is desired to attach a new barrel "to the gun, the-barrel 5 is 'inserted within the coupling member 17 so that,

21. The'couplin member 17 is then placed on the boss 14 an turnedwith res ect there-- to so that the threads 19 engage t e threads .14 and the threads 16 engage the threads 15 and the barrel is thus brought into position. I

. In order to hold the barrel 5 in position the following locking means are employed. The handle portion 18 of the coupling member 17 is recessed as shown at 22, and a lock 23 having a bevel face 24 as shown 1n Fig. 31 is inserted therein. A spring 25 normally urges the lock 23 outward. The lock 23 and the spr ng are mounted upon a pin 26 which extends through the handleportion 18 and which has formed integral therewith,

the lever 27 is, rotated approx1mately 90' from the position shown in Figs. 29 and 30, the edge ofthe recess 28 rides over the bevel face 24 of the lock 23 and forces the latter into the recess 22 against the action of the sprin 25. This movement of the lock 23 30 whereby the lever 27 withd i'aws it from the notch 29 in the flange on the boss 14 and permits the coupling member 17; and the barrel 5 to be rotated. In order to prevent the lock'23 and the lever '27 from being forced away from the handle portion 18 by the sprin 25, aprojection 30 is provided preferably ormed integral with the handle portion 18, and having a slot cut therein in which the lever27 is adapted to rotate during the unlocking movement de scribed above. In Fig. 30, the lever'27 is shown being held in position against the face of the handle portion 18 by the slot 'cut in the projection 30 as described above. The

pin 26 is positioned eccentrically with re-' 1 spect to the sides of the lever 27 so that this be-rotated to a position where one. side thereof will be clear of the projection and the lock 23 may be inserted within or withdrawn from the handle portion 18. When it is desired to change barrels the coupling member is unlocked asdescribed above and is rotated about the boss 14 until the barrel 5 is out of engagement with the threads 15 in the boss 14. The coupling member 17 may be locked in this osition by having another notch 29' lever may cut in t e flange on boss 14 into whichthe sitioned. 'While the coupling member 1 is in this second locked position, a new barrel may be inserted therein and. when the coupling member 17 lock 23 may be is rotated, the new barrel will be connected to the boss 14 as described above.

It is desirable'to supply "oil to the car .tridges as theyare being inserted into the withdrawn therefrom after being fired. The

barrel in order that they may be more easily means which I preferably employ to do this may be described as follows, reference being made more particularly to Figs. 1-3 and 29. An annular pad washer 31 of felt or similar materialis positioned in a suitable recess in the end of the barrel 5' and held in position therein by-means off a retaining member 32 threaded in the barrel. This retaining mem- I ber '32 is screwed into the barrel .5 so as to hold the washer 31 in position but not so tightly as to compress the oil from' the washer orto prevent the oilfromflowing freely in the washer. The interior of the barrel 5 may be and preferably is provided with a shoulder which limits the position of the retaining member 32. As shown in Fig.

by the washer '31 is inclined toward the rear of the gun so that which projects slightly into the barrel bore is adjacent the end face of the barrel. The cartridges will therefore be oiled throughout their entire lengfih. Another very im ortant is construction is t at the cartridges are supportedalong their entire advantage of t is connected with a circular recess 35 inthe.

interior of the coupling member-by a small hole indicated at 36 in Fig. 29. When the coupling member 17 is in position on the gun the recess 35 lies adjacent to a' similar recess 37 on the exterior surface of the boss 14. A small hole 38 is made in the lower part of the boss 14 to permit the oil to flow from'the recess 35- -37 to the'interior of the '3 the recess in the barrel 5 is bevelled wherethe inner edge thereof.

boss 14. A plurality ofv holes 39 are made in the end of the barrel 5 adjacent the ad washer 31 throughwhich the oil may ow from the interior of the boss 14 to the pad washer 31 and from the latter to the cartridges-as they are being inserted into the barrel 5. I V i It will be observed from Fig. 3' that when thebarrel5 and the coupling member 17 are in their normal positions on the gun the rear face of the couplin member 17 contacts with the flange'on t e forwardend of the.

receiver 2 and the internal flange on the forward end of the coupling member 17 (see Fig. 29) contacts with the barrel 5 and the I I front of boss 14. This construction prevents leakage of the oil from the interior of the gun.

'Receiver cover 11 which is slidably mounted in dovetail connection upon the receiver 2 and which is locked theretois provided to enclose the operating parts of the gun'a'nd to house the actuator'13 and its associated parts including the main spring 40.

' The receiver cover 11 is locked on the receiver 2 by means of the following construc-- tion. On the under surfaces of the receiver 'cover 11 dovetail flanges are formed to slide in and lock against the receiver in grooves '10, and at the forward end of the cover 11 slot 43 through which the empty cartridge shells are ejected after the firing of the gun and through which the magazine is reloaded as described hereinafter. This slot 43 is open while the gun is in operation but may 7 be closed when e an is not in use in order to protect the mec anism of the gun. A member 44 adapted to cover this slot 43 is slidably mounted in dovetail connection upon the receiver cover 11 as shown clearly in Figs. 10 and 27. This slidable member 44 is rovided with a flat spring 45 which is held thereto by means of a dovetail connection as shown in Fig. 28. The spring 45 is provided at its rear endwith an-inte-' gral' locking projection 46 which extends inwardly from the inner surface of the spring 45 and downwardly from the lower surface of this member as shown in Figs. 13 and 27. This projection 46 is adapted to be placed in recesses 47 cut in the lateral face of the receiver cover 11 and also in recesses 48 cut in the lateral face of the receiver 2. The object of such construction is to lock the slidable member 44 tothe receiver cover 11 and to lock the latter to the receiver 2 when the slidable member is in rear position when the unis in use or in its forward position when t e gun is closed. The end of the spring 45 is provided with a forwardly extending projection 49 and the slidable member 44 is provided with a rearwardly extending projection 50 in order to prevent breakage of the spring 45 when it is being lifted out of locked position. The slidable member 44 has a slot 51 (see Fig. 27) in its. forward end adaptedto accommodate the handle 52 of the actuator 13 to hold the same in locked position when the gun is not in use. slot 43 in the receiver cover 11 extends rearwardly as indicated at 53 in Fi 24 to accommodate this handle 52 when t e actuator 13 is in its rearmost' position.

The opening and closing of the breech of the gun to withdraw a fired cartridge and to insert a loaded one into the barrel is performed by a longitudinal reciprocatingweight or actuator 13 and its associated parts including a bolt to be more fully described hereinafter. The actuator 13 which is adaoted to reciprocatewithinthe receiver 2' as escribed'above has a reduced section The.

(hereinafter described) is slidably and rotatably mounted. A slotted sleeve 55 is placed within the actuator 13 and-extends a substantial distance therein as shown clearly in Fig. 1. To hold this sleeve in position in the actuator 13, the interior surface ofthe rear end of the actuator 13 has out therein a plurality of circular grooves as indicated at 56. The teeth thus formed in the actuator 13 are stripped in a lurality of places similar to the stripping of the threads 15 illustrated in Fig. 29 and described above. The rear end of the sleeve 55 is provided with arcuate projections or teeth 57 corresponding in thickness to the grooves 56 and corresponding in length to the stripped portions described above whereby the sleeve 55' may be inserted longitudinally into the actuator 13 until the teeth 57 are brought in aligmnent with the grooves 56 when the sleeve 55 is rotated to position the teeth 57 .within the grooves 56. This turning movement of the sleeve 55 is accomplished by means of the firin pin mechanism to be more fully describe hereinafter.

The firing pin 58 is rotatably and slidably mounted within the sleeve.55 and the pro jection 54, and its length and position with respect to the actuator 13 is such that it projects through the bolt when the gun is fired.

A spring 59 on the firing pin is placed within the actuator 13 between the sleeve 55and a collar 60 on the firing pin 58 as shown -in Fig. 1, and normally urges the firing pin forward. When the gun is in firing position and the firing pin 58 is uncooked by pulling the trigger as described hereinafter,

this spring causes the firin pin to be moved forward to strike the primer of the cartridge. The firing pin 58 is provided with an integral projection 61, hereinafter referred to as the rack projection, which extends through 'slots in the actuator 13 and the sleeve 55 as shown in Figs. 6 and 10 and which projects below the lower surface of the actuator 13. The sleeve 55 is turned out of locked engagement with the actuator 13.by means of the rack projection 61 as follows: The firing pin 58 is pulled backward against the action of the spring 59 until the rack projection 61 is in al1gnmentwith a recess 62 (see Fig. 16) cut in the reduced end 'ofthe actuator. Since the rack projection. 61- lies within the slot in the sleeve 55 when it is pushed into the recess 62, the sleeve 55 will be rotated. This movement of the sleeve 55 brings the arcu ate projection 57 in alignment with the stripped portions of the actuator 13 whereby the sleeve 55 may be withdrawn from the actuator 13, and likewise inserted in assem bling.

The projection 61 is provided with rack teeth as indicated at'63 which are adapted to engage a hand operated pinion, more fully described below, whereby thefiring pin 58 may be recocked by handoperation without ..movin .back the actuator or opening the bree h of the gun in caserec'ocking is desired because of failure of a cartridge to explode struck, or when, for any other rea fi son hand recocking of'the firing pin is desirable.' The number'of teeth on the rack projection 61 is proportional to the distance which thefiring'pin must be moved through to be recocked.

The firing pin 58 is locked in cockedposition on the actuator 13 by a locking member 64, shown in perspective in Fi 26. This locking member 64 is positione in a recess 65 formed in the rear end of the. actuator'l3 in front of the reduced end'thereof and is .pivotally connected thereto by a trunnion 66 adapted to be inserted longitudinally in a suitable bearing in the actuator (see Figs. 6 and 10). On the lower end of the locking member 64 there is a sear projection 67 having a bevel'face 68 and adapted to contact with the front face of the rack projection 61 to hold the firin pin in cockedi position on the actuator unti it is desired to release the' same by pulling the trigger. When the trigger is pulled, a scar tripper or releaser, hereinafter described, wedges in between the rack projection 61 and the-bevel face 68 .of the locking member 64 and forces the latter to turn on its trunnion 66 into the position 'lVhen thus release A longitudinal flatspring 69 adapted .to

hold the locking member 64 in the recess 4 in the actuator lies is an inclined groove on v the lateral face of the actuator 13 and is is located a sufficient distance below the face of'the actuator 13 so that when the locking held in position at its forward end by a dovetailconn'ect ion (see Fig. The springs 69 member 6 1' is turned' about its trunnion 66 thedistance required to release'=the firin pin, the spring 69 willnotiproject bcyon the face of the actuator 13zto interfere-with the reciprocation-of'the same within. the receiver2. w 1 The bolt 70 which'is slidably and rotatably mounted on the projection 54 oftheact'uator is a substantiallycylindricalmember having. I v

" the tappet,-. said pr mercomi'ng. outof its as' is permitted-by 3 two diametrically; opposite locking lugs 71 which are adapted to 1 slid through correyjtapp the cartridge when the the" primer cartridge such distance sponding recesses 72 inthe forward end of. .the limited ba kward-movemen 0f greater depth than the other to permit the extractor 73 and a spring 74, adapted to hold the extractor in position to move out from the bolt 7 0 in the event there is a cartridge in the barrel when the bolt 70 is placed in fir-' ing position over the head of which cartridge the extractor would be obliged topass.

The spring 74' is held in a fixed lateral posi- .tion byxrea'son of itsrear end extending into a recess'75 in the actuator 13, aslshown in- Fig. 18, in which recess said (spring reci rocates betweentheactuator 13' and bolt 0 by themovement of the latter. The extractor73which is-adapted to withadapted to be" positioned 111 a dovetail groove in the front face of. oneof the lugs 71 on'the bolt as shown in Fig. 17; When in the receiver'2. I Onejof' therecesses 72 is of place the extractor 73 has its face flushwi'th the front face of'the bolt. 'The' end of the I extractor73 is recessed as indicated gage in the circular grooves on t e head of the cartridges. A projection 78 on the ex- 5' tractor 73 shouldering in recess 79 in the bolt 70 restricts said extractor to its proper posttion relative to engagement on the catridge at the same time holding it 1 in position. -Wh enthe extractor 73 is withdrawing an e y cartridge,

same against the cartridge. he forward end of the spring is offset as shown for the purpose of contacting with the. extractor 73.

bolt 70, cess 75 to the recess 72 cooperates with the reof locking position."

A studor trunnion inner face ofthe spring 74 and is'adapted the spring 7.4 lies directly over, the extractor forcibly ressing. the

a and beveled in front as shown at 7 7 This I beveled and recessed edge is ada ted to enso projects sea the 1 Inc to engage in aspiral-slot 81 cut-in the face of the boltj70 as shown iii-Fig; 17. This it stud 80 extends through the slot 81 into a longitudinal groove 82 cutin' a tappet 83 which is positioned within the bolt 70 at its" forward end. Integral with the tappet 83 is a projection 84. which extends slightly :1

the face 'of the bolt 70. The -pur'- "pose of thisiconsti'uction is to bring thef" et' 83 into contact; with the primer. of $11 is ready to,fire.-- ing' position, the front of the tappet 83 is in contact-,-.with-f-v while' its rear" endis ahutted rojection 54 of the) actuator H h firedjthe primer is instantly forced back against the face :of'

beyond When the gun is in against the an draw freely the empty cartridge from-the j barrel is a flat member havin beveled edges j i tappet 83 (about .05 inch being a preferred behind the internal flange of the receiver adjacent the recesses 72 therein. The face of the bolt-I70 is held firmly against the end of the cartridge thus momentarily preventing the cartridge from moving backward when the primer and tappet move back. As, however, the power generated in the firing is instantly transmitted through the tappet to the actuator, the latter is forced back the full distance required to open the gun breech, compress the main spring and operate the parts preparatory to inserting a loaded cartridge in the barrel. This backward movement of the actuator 13- leaves the tappet 83 in its rearmost position with respect to the bolt 70. The bolt 70 is locked to the receiver by means of the lugs 71 while the actuator moves a part of its distance backward. This momentary retention .of the bolt 70 allows, the bullet enough time to get out of the barrel before 85 cut in the face of the bolt 70 into which there projects a pin 86 which is set in the v actuator on the forward end of the same.

The groove 85 is out parallel with the centerline'of the bolt for a short distance at its forward end whereby the pin 86 is carried a short distance in the oove 85 without afiecting the position 0 the bolt as the actuator 1s urged rearwardly. But

as the actuator continues to travel back-' ward the pin 86 is brought into contact with the sides of the spiral groove 85 and thereby turns the bolt 70. When the pin 86 has reached the rear end of the groove 85, the

bolt has been turned out of engagement with the .receiver and its lugs 71 are in alignment with' recesses 72.- The actuator continues to move backwards and carries the bolt along with it b means of the pin 86, and also'b means 0 a cammed pin 87, positioned in t e actuator a little to the rear of the pin 86, where it is forced into a locking recess or hole 88 in the bolt behind the spiral groove 85. The bolt 70 is then in its forward position relative tothe actuator and is locked to the actuator in this position by the said'pin' 87.

At the moment the bolt 70 begins to turn as described above, the stud which projects through the spiral slot 81 into the groove 82 in the tappet 83 is moved for ward and forces the tappet 83 back to its most forward position with respect to the bolt. 'This forward movement of the tap- 1pet 83 forces the primer of 'the cartridge ack into its original position from which it had moved in striking back the tappet the required limited distance to transmit power to the actuator. It is obvious that these'movements of bolt and tappet must restore the primer to its original position after the firing, as the bolt in the mean-' time has not been permitted to leave its cates'and which are provided with camming surfaces 90. Between the projections 89 the cover has a groove cut therein which terminates a little to' the rear of said projections in an inclined camming surface 91. The projections and camming surfaces function in conjunction with the pin 87 to lock and unlock the actuator to and from the bolt.

When the actuator 13 is urged forward b the main sp-rin 40 the head of the pin 8 contacts with tie cammed surfaces 90 and causes the head of the pin to be raised into the groove in the receiver cover 11 between the projections 89 while the lower end of the in. 87 is drawn out of the hole 88 in the olt. This movement ofthe pin frees the bolt .in time to permit it to be locked in firing position. When the actuator travels backward, the head of the pin 87 after passin between the projections 89, contacts with t e inclined surface 91 which forces the pin downward into the hole 88, locking the bolt and actuator together as they thereafter continue to travel backward.

One of themain objects of locking the bolt 70 to the actuator 13 when the bolt is in its relative forward position is to hold the bolt firmly in alignment with the 're-' cesses'72 and to avoid wedging of the.pin

.86 in the spiral groove 85 because of any tendency the bolt might have to turn when inserting a cartridge into the barrel. j

To start the gun in operation the actuator must be pulled back by hand to permit the.

first cartridge to be lifted from the 'magazine andinserted into the barrel, unless a cartndge' has first'been placed in thebarrel. Accordingly the actuator 13 is provided with v a handle 52 which projects laterally from the forward end .of'the actuator and termi nates in a recessed knob as shown. The

handle 52 travels in the slot 43-53 in the receiver. cover 11 (see Fig.f24=).. When the v actuator is in its most forward position it reeae'avl is not in use, by the slidable'member 44, 1n.

the forward end of which there is a 5101153 receiver cover as described above In the event of disablement of some of the automatic parts of the gun, the actuator may be operated by hand by means of the handle the level 105 and to one side of the center- A trigger 92 is pivotally-mou'nted on a pin 93 between two spaced projections 95 formed integral with the receiver 2. lever 94 is pivotally connected to the receiver 2 as shown and is adapted to hold the actuator 13 in its rear-most position at the time the magazine'is being reloaded. The trigger 92 has a substantially circular recess connected with cam surfaces 96 cut therein in which the end of a lever 97 is adapted to be inserted so as to pivotally connect this lever to the trigger. This lever 97 is adapted to actuate a sear tripper or releaser by movement of the trigger 92. Near the forward end of the lever 97 and on the 7 upper sides thereof a projection 98 is formed ing step 99 formed in tripper 100. A spring trigger a. order to also serves to l the spring 'tion of the spring,

. with the receiverwhich is adapted to contact with a project- 'one face of the. sear 101 normally holds the projection 98 against the front of the step 99. If the trigger-92 be pulled back the lever 97 will move back ina horizontal line, in its trigger. the sear tripper 100 point This backward movement causes to turn about its pivot the sear projection 67 from the firing pin,

the cam surface 96 on the front of the and'backwardsthus causing the projection 98 to come away from the'step 99. The

sear tripper 100 is then instantly brought down to its normal position by the actlon of 101 which siderable tension on the spring 101 afterer-100 has-'been'returned to its theseartripp because of the angular posinormal' position,

gage with the step-99 at the as shown in Fig. 2.:-'=-This projection abuts,

it the return movement 0 the sear tripper .100, The 'upper" ed e; f

the rear end of the lever 9,7 't11II1lDg limited pivotal joint connection on the 102. When the sear tripper has thusbeen lifted, the required distance to release I the pressure of which ithas been is connected to the lever 97 and the firing pin vcocking lever,

' the sear 'tri-pper the lever- 97 is instantly urged forward and upwardsto again en- :moment the'I 92 is' released by theoperator. "In limit the upward movement of the 1 lever 97 a projection 103 is formed integral 2 against which lever 97 v v p ,lever,;105' and at the other endto' the lover,- I f -97 in-the inclined position shown. "As ten sion' is placed on the spring '101 by the draw- .4 t

t of the levers 97 and" 105 in the lifting operation ofthe sear'trip 130 Mon,

the .tripper F100 has a beveled 'surfacef104adapted to .con tact vwith the bevel facei68' on thexs'ear-pro-l-"f jection 67,. as shown Fig. 6, toreinove the f locking member' 64 from the path of the I I 1ngp1n.- .A lever 105 which ,is pivotally connected rack projection 61 thereby releasing the fir V j to accommodate the handle 52 when the A member 44 is locked on the receiver and the, 7o 1 ing pinpn the actuator. At the rear end of I line thereof, a' step 1071-i's provided in line,

with the path of the rackprojectiontll on" A the firing pin 58 against which step the rack projectionis detained wlien the lever 105 is in its upward osition, as shown in Figs. 1

and 2.- The firmg pin is detainedasuflici'ent time to permit the actuator during its forward travel to bring .the locking member 64 just .in' front'of the rack projection 61 when it will be forced into the path ofthe 7. rack projection by the spring 69thi1s lock ing the cooked firingpinon the actuator) While the firing pin is thus being cocked atuator, behind the locking member 64,'is traveling up rear end of thelever 105, the lever being gradually depressed by this-projection as the actuator moves forward. At the same" time thelocking member 64 is permitted to pass through a shown injFigs. 10 and 11. As themember 64.emerges from the groove 110 and locks' the cooked firing pin,'the projection 108 is just reaching the top of. the inclinedsurface 109. and has depressed the lever 105 far enoughto throw it out of'th'e path of the already cocked firing pin 58.' While this cocking operation is- -going" on the actuator continues to move forward" under the urge I groove 110 cut the lever. 105, adjacent the inclined surface 109, as

of the main spring 40. After thefiring'pin ,is cooked it is carried forward on the actuatorto the position from whence it. is fired under the urge of its-own spring,59 against cocked.

' -'The--lever 105 is provided with trunnions 111. adapted-- to; engage inslots 112 in the seartripper=100 as shown in Fi 25, to keep 100- and the ever 105 in alignment cooperatively with'the other parts of the gun mechanism'jwhile leaving the spective pivotalpoints in the lifting opera for spring: 101.

, The spring 101.. is fastened. atlione to I ing apart movement per 100 the spring actsto pull down the le-' itrunnions 111"free to slide in'the slots'112, as the sear tripp'erf100 andthe lever 105 move in opposite directions aroundtheir reandadapted to provide a fulcrum base ver 105 as soon at the sear tripper 100 is freed from the projection 98. The lever 105 by reason of the trunnions lllbeingin the slots 112 forces the sear to return to its normal position. As'it is impossible to release the trigger 'quick enough to let the lever 97 go forward before the sear tripper 100 has returned to its normal position, the lever 97 becomes the base foroperation of the spring 101. After the'sear tripper 100 is in its normal position the lever 105 becomes the base for the spring 101 to draw the lever 97 again into cooperative engagement. with the sear. 1 j

The lever 97 is so positioned in guideways 113, formed in the depending portions 7 of the receiver 2, that this lever is confined to a limited downward movement. When the trigger 92 is pulled back until the cam surface 96 contacts with I the lever 97, a slight further movement of the trigger brings the lever 97 in contact with thebottom of the guideways 113. The construction thus described restricts the lever 97 and the trigger 92 to their required backward movements.

One of the lateral faces of the sear tripper 100 has a substantially circular recess 114'cut therein to house a partially stripped pinion 115 asshown in Fig. 25. The teeth on.this pinion are adapted to engage the teeth 630m the rack projection 61 to .cause the firing pin, if it is-desired, to be drawn back for recocking by hand means. As. the pinion 115 lies in the path of the rack projection 61 a section of its teeth is cut, away to allow the rack projection to pass when the pinion is in its normal position with the stripped section uppermost. A slot 116 is cut in the sear tripper 100 to accommodate a rotatable shaft member 117 upon which the pinion 115 is keyed by means of a flat projection 118. on the member 117 which contacts with the surface 119 of the pinion. The

rotatable shaft member 117' inmounted position, extends through the lower part of the receiver '2, having its bearings in holes therein, one of which is larger than the otherto allow said projections 118 to pass when going to mounted engagement with the pinion 115-when. assembling the gun.

The slot 116 allows the sear tripper 100to turn freely about its pivot point 102.

The ejector 120 is rotatably mounted on the smallerend of the member 117. The rear end of the upper surface of the ejector 120 is provided with a projection or earn 121 which is adapted to raise and lower the front end of the ejector so that the ejector may be placed in the path of the cartridge shells as they are withdrawnfrom the barrel or be positioned out of the path of the cartridges as they go forward. The cam 121 is in ali nment with and travels-in a groove 122 .in the underface ofthe actuator 13 and reaches the forward end of the groove 123 in the bolt it is forced down by the inclined termination of the groove '123. This action forces the front end of the ejector 120 up-': ward into an inclined groove 12a inthe forward end of the bolt adjacent the groove 123, in which inclined groove 124 the ejector rises to its uppermost position so that its forward end projects beyond the face of the bolt'70. The ejector 120 emerges through the slot 124 just in time to force the shell from the bolt 7 0 as it reaches its most rearward position to which the actuator has carried it. Going forward from this rearmost position the bolt 70, by means of the inclined slot 124, forces down the front end of the ejector 120 which action at the same returns to its rearmost position.

Reference to Fig. 2 will show that when the forward end of the ejector 120 lies in its lowermost position, it projects beyond the face of the depending portion 8 of the receiver 2 and lies in the circular path of the cartridges on the magazine. In its upper position in which itis adapted to eject the empty shells the said ejector is out of the path of the cartridgeson the magazine.

The front end of the ejector 120 is provided I with clearance recesses as indicated at 125 and 126 to allow the bolt and actuator to pass the ejector 120 when the latter is in its upper and lower positions respectively. The

- bolt and the actuator until the actuator 13 rotatable shaft member 117 is provided with a head or circular enlargement 127 at one end as shown in Fig. 25, which is provided with a radially pro ecting cam 128 adapted to raise the lever 94,,above mentioned, and

to actuate a slidable member hereinafter dc scribed. On the outer face of the head 127 there are provided radial projections 129. The outer end of one of these project-ions is integral with the cam 128 as shown in Fig. 25. The lever 94 has an extension 130 "which, when the lever 94 is in its normal position, rests on the head 127 of the rotatable member 117 as seen in Fig. 3. Turning of the member 117 about its axis brings 1 the cam 128 into contact with the'under surface. of the extension 130, causing the lever '94 to be raised so that its vertical portion I rangement serves to hold back the actuator" when it is in its rearmost position to allow the magazine to be reloaded. The lever 94 is provided with a vertical projection 133 adapted to contact with the cam 128. Turning of the member 117 about its axis brings the cam 128 into contact with the vertical projection 133 on the member 94 and causes this member to turn about its pivot point to turnthe lever 94 out of the pathof the actuator and back to its normal'position.

A slidable member 134 is suitably mountj ed on the lateral face of the receiver 2 as shown in Figs. 3 and 24. At the rear end of this member there is a downward projection lug 135 against which the projection 129 on the rotatable member 117 is brought in contact when the member-117 is rotated, such rotationbringing the cam 128 and-the projection 129 into action simultaneously to liftthe lever 94 and'to pushb ack the slidable member 134 respectively, which parts lie out 7 of the path of each other. The slidable member 134 is provided with a spring 136 at its forward end to draw it back to position after it has been released from the rearward position to which it was drawn by the cam 128. Back teeth 137 are cut on the inner side of the forward end of the slidable member 134 and are adapted to mesh with the teeth 138 in amember 139 which is adapted to hold the uppermost cartridges in position on the magazine. The retaining member 139 is pivoted in place-by means of an integral trunnion 140 which lies in a suitable recess 141 out in the receiver 2 as shown-in I Figs. 4 and 5.- The slidable member 134in engagement with the member 139 holds the trunnion 140 in the recess 141. In the operation of the gun the retaining member 139 is;

- her 139 the spring 136'act-s' to draw the slid-1 able'member 134 forward,""pl'acing the re taining member 139 again over the cartridges in the magazine togpreventuthem from falling off should the gun beturned up side down. y

To reload the magazine iwith cartridges it. I

i is necessary to put'the retaining member 139' out of the way by hand operated means.

* her-117 as shown in Fig.'-.6.'--f1 he handle 142 has a "slot cutjtherein adapted to engage 101..I The projection-145 is'pulled out"of member 117;- The bolt- 143.which.extends through the stockd, theniembr 117" and the This is accomplishedby a handle 142(Fig.

27) located within a suitable recess in .the "lateral face of the stock l'held in position by a bolt 143 which extends through the handle 142 ,and through the fStOClLQf the:

the rotatable meni- 145 is moved back and f ortli by t e ratchet gun,- as well. as throng thefprojecting portions .129 on the rotatable handle 142- holds these parts together,-and is a held inplaee by a' recessed nut 144 adapted to accommodate the end of the handle 142 I I as shown in Fig.6. In the-outer portion of the nut 144 there is a threaded hole by means ofwhich the nut 144 is adapted to be threaded on'the bolt 143 to hold the rotatable member 117 and handlef142in position on the gun. The handle as it lies inthe recess of the nut 144 is therefore free to turn its re- ;quired distance. When the handle is thus mounted and joined to the" rotable' member 1 17, thehandle 142 and the rotatable member'117 turn together to actuate the lever 94, the inion 115- and the slidable member 134 v as a ove described.

From the following description it will be seenl. that the hand recocking mechanism does not interfere with the operation of. the other parts of the mechanism which are- .associated with the rotatable member 117.-

In the operation required'to recock the firing pin, the pinion 115 has its teeth'brought I into engagement-with the teeth on the rack projectlon 61 thus causingthe firing pinto go back to recocking position. As, however,

this operation is being performed" when vthe actuator and its associated parts are in their forward position, the lever 94, which was raised at the same time, is free to rise behind the actuator 13 without interference. The 1 bolt 70has pushed the retaining member 139 I 3 toone side as described above. The release of the firing pin 58, by'means ofthe trigger causes the rack'projection 61 to go forward with its teeth still engaged 'with'the teeth of the pinion 115, thusgcausing the :pinoin115,

the rotatable (member 117 and thejhandle 142 to rotate and depress the lever94 therev byreturning these parts {to their normal positions. 1'

\ In the operation required to position the projection 131 vof the lever '94 in front of the actuator 13, the said-actuator and associated-parts are in their: rearmost position .and there is nothing to -inter fere =--with the pinion as it turns with the handle A and the rotatable member 117. 11

..-end of the projection 1451is1 beveled so that. "it can-easily slide over the ratchet .teethl iti,

The sear tripper 100 1s provided with an;

bfiset projection 145 adapted to'pas'sthrough 115 whenthe'magazine is rotatedIin'onedirec-f 1 tion. This it does when the magazine is rotated for'the purpose'cf loading withcart'ridges, and for ,winding' its {operating spring at the same time. The" 101612131011 teeth.146 on the magazine and the; spring engagement with the magazine by-means of 100. This disengagement of the projection 145 is only for an instant as the spring 101 again throws it back as the sear tripper 100 is released. During this instant of discon-. nection' the magazine rotates less. than one notch because the ejector projects,-as above stated, into the path of the cartridges and acts as a stop to hold the magazine to a slight movement. While the magazine is thus held back and the projection 145 ,is pressin against the bevel of the next ratchet tooth, t e actuator 13 and bolt 7 O are returnposition and uponcontact ing from firin of the bolt wit thecam 121 on the e ector 120, the magazine 9 is released by the bolt forcing the detainin ejectorout of the way i of the c-artridges. The magazine then continues to rotate until the projection 145 slides into the notch and holds the magazine to a one tooth movement for each re-- cipro cation of the breech mechanism.

In this construction a definite relationship must be maintained between the length of the pawl projection 145 on the sear tripper 100 and the'depth of the ratchet teeth 146 formed in the rear face of the magazine. When the trigger 92 is released the awl projection 145 immediately contacts wit 1 the bevel= face of the next ratchet tooth and slides along this face as the magazine continues to rotate.

The-magazine 9 comprises a substantially hollow cylindrical member which is supported upon a shaft/147 having a large in tegral inwardly-flanged head 148, the inte rior of which forms a circular guideway 149 for the forward end of the cartridges. A

central flange 150 on the innerface of the member 148 is adapted to form the bearing for theforward end of the magazine 9 as shown 'in Fig. 1. The rear end of the shaft 147, reduced as shown, forms the bearing .for the rear end of the magazine. Around the shaft .147 a spring 151 is mounted which has a central loop 152 adapted to engage on a stud 153 which is provided in the interior of the magazine 9. The spring 151 is fastened to the shaft 147 at each end. Stop projections 154 and 155 provided on the magazine 9 and the member 148 respectively,

serve to limitthe rotationof the magazine 9 to one turn. 1

The exterior of the magazine 9 is provided with a plurality of grooves 156 in which the cartridges are positioned in loading. These grooves 156 terminate in front in inclined surfaces 157 adapted to raise the forward end of the cartridges as they are inserted in the barrel of the gun by the bolt. To'place the magazine 9 in position in the receiver 2, the magazine and the member 147 must first be assembled. The magazine 9 is set back within the flange 158 formed integral with the depending portion 8 on the receiver. A cenin the gun stock receives these projection to open and close the hole 162.

'- Toloadthe gun a clip 166 adapted to hold I tra l supporting .pin 159 is then inserted through-the shaft 147 havingits bearings in w the depending portions 8 of the re cewer. The forward end of the pin 159 is made large in order to abut against the member 148 to hold the magazine 9 in position. The 4 1 enlarged end ofthe pin .159 extends beyond the receiver projection 8 and is of-semi-circular cross-section and adapted to liejonl a similar projection 160"forni;ed integral" 1th the receiver projection -8. 'A circulalf and the bolt 4 is screwed into the projection 160 with Jra'free end, adapted to pass into a hole in the head of the pin thus securely holding these parts to the stock.

In case, it may be desiredto assist the rotation of the magazine 9 when loading it 1 with cartridges, a flexible wire or string 161 is provided which is connected with the stop member 154 on themagazine and whiclt passes through the front of the member 148 g so as to be out ofthe path of the cartridges." The wire 161 hangs down in sufiicient'length to allow it to be wound on the magazine 9 when said magazine is turned for loadmodate the finger Whenthe gun is inuse'.

(lpposite the trigger 92 a hole 162 is made V in the lateral face of the stock 1 to accom- To protect the interior mechanism and enclose the trigger with the' other parts when the gun is not in use, a cover-plate. 163 is provided (Fig. 27) which has a cylindrical projection 164 integral'therewith inwhich a groove 165. is formed. This groove is' adapted to engage the bolt 3 to hold the cover plate 163 on the gunso ,that' it free .a plurality ofcartridges is placed in the' slot43 inthe receiver cover'll as shown in L Fig. 12. e I Figs. 32 and 36 show a modification of my invention. My object making; this design is mainly ,to bring the power generated in the gun to bear through the car tridge primer directly against the forward end of the firing pin and-through the firing 1 the use of an intermediate tappet piece.

pinto the actuator without As shown in Figs. '32 and 35 the actuator I i 167 is made without an interior forward projection such as has been'des'cribed, and thc firing .pin' 168 is' enlarged in diameter" to accommodate the bolt 169 which is mounted thereon in the front recess 170 in tor. The rear end of the firing'pin is hollow for a considerable distance to actzommo date the firing spring 171. The firing pin is the actua- A provided with a rack projection 172 similar 1 to the one previously described except in this design there are two locking points on the --ra'ck projection instead of only one to which a the locking member 173 is locked, namely:

the front fa ce of the projection .172 and, a point further back 174 wherevthe locking member locks when the firing pin has. been sent ,to forward positionin the firing of the gun. Thus locked in this forward position to the actuator by means of the locking member 173, the firing pin and the actuator function as one piece. There re, at the moment of firing, ,the blow on ing in. the actuator and; firing 'pin being thrust; back together. .Theprimer in going back after'the firing pinand'actuator, is

stopped by a'shouldenf'l'ifi cut in.;a. little 'below' the front face of the bolt 169. By the movement rearwardly of the actuator-167 the bolt is turned as before described-r After reaching its rearmost position .the actuator forced out of en agement with the rack pro.- jection 172 on the firing'pin'as said-locking member goes past. As this movement, takesplace the firing pin is being detained'as before described to cook on the locking member 173, from which posit-ion it is fired when the breech of the gun is closed and the bolt and actuator are in firing position. A mem ber 178 is suitably fastened'ito theieduced',

rear end of the actuator and servesrasthc rear abutment for the interior-firing pin spring 171.

tractor and bolt that isrelatively rotatable to the bolt, the extractor spring 179 is 10-. cated in a groovejon the face of the bolt 169 and has its rear end connected tothe bolt by a dovetail joint. The forward part of the spring extends through a; longitudinal slot in one of the legs on the bolt and the end of the spring is-"ihserted in a groove ing surfaces on ,the actuator are reduced to I guards the pins in the actuator-"while the othe a minimum toeliminatefriction as much as possible. The top surface of. the actuator is providedwith a central ridge at front and rear ends, one of which' ridges houses and I retect's the bearing for the trunnion ont e member, I I depend, of course,' o 3th to the primer at the time of the explosion of 'the'lpowder, in the cartridga to ,r'un'the un; I but, in' additiongto this ion on the primer front of the firing Y pin is passed instantly tngthe' actuator result ward end of the ng pin locking" power applied there is a substantial-recoil thrust ap lied.

the 1 front of the actuator being inf 'direct condirectly to the actuator byreason 0 tact. with the forward flange on-the end of the receiver. I

The rear end. of the receivercover 'll is provided with parallel.;.,wa lls 182-adapted to support asuitable-rear'sight 183 and to house the sight when the gun is not in use.

Having ,thusdescribed this form of my invention, I wish it, to be understood that various changes may be made b skilled in the art withput departing f spirit and scope of my invention. 3

What I claim and desireto protect by Let, ters Patent is: i

.1. In a gun,.a receiver havingguideways fora. breech "lock and'locking f grooves. 1n

those min the which a breech cover is slidablylocke'd and provided with depending portions adapted to support a trigger and associated parts and to carrya magazine and v rovided at its forward endwith a sectiona ly-threaded projecting head adapted to receivev a barrelon the inside and to receive a rotatable, barrel-detachable, coupling member on the outside.

2. In a gun, a receiver having guideways for a breech. block and locking grooves in which a breech cover is slidably locked and provided with depending-portions to sup port a trigger and associated parts and.

adapted-to carry a magazine andprovided i V I p v at its forward end'wi th a sectionally thread- These' changes in. the construction of the-*ed projecting fhead adaptedbto receive ,a' firing pin necessitate changes in the bolt as well as the, actuator.' As in this case itis not necessaryto have ajspring on thefex-f Ibarrel on the inside'anurto receive a rotatexterior threads cut insections adapted to receive'the barreland coupling member and ito bring both into locked {position on the receiver simultaneously.

gable, barrel-detachable, coupling member on I theoutside, said headvhaving interior and In a gun, a' receiveriprovided at its forward end with afc oupling 'head having inside and outside threads to which the barrel of the gun and a barrel-detachable coup'ling member'are rotatably and removably connected and means adapted to lock the coupling member in position on the barrel and on the receiver while simultaneously.

locking the barrel to the receiver.

4. In a. gun, a receiver provided'at its forward end 'with a'coupling head having connected, means adapted to lock the coupling member, the J barrel and .the receiver together simultaneously, said coupling meInber and receiver head :having adjacent re-- 'cesses adapted'to contain-1a supplf/of oil.

'-5.'--In a gunfa receiver provi ed at-its forward endwith a couplin head to which the barrel of the n isa apted'ito be re- -movably connecte a 7 coupling member rel having a similar threaded portion whereby the barrel may be inserted longitudinally within saidhead and be connected therewith, a coupling member adapted to be placed over said head and to rotate said barrel, a handle adapted to rotate said cou pling member and means for locking said coupling member to said head when said barrel is in position.

7. In a gun, a receiver provided at its forward end with a coupling head to which the barrel of the gun is adapted to be removably connected, a coupling member adapted to be placed over said head and to rotate the barrel, a handle adapted to rotate said coupling member, a receiver cover and means for locking said coupling member to said head and for locking said receiver cover to said receiver.

8. In a gun, a barrel and means positioned in and surrounding a part of the firing. chamber of the barrel for lubricating the,

calrtridges as they are inserted into the barre 9. In a gun, a barrel'having meanspositioned in and surrounding a part 'of the firing chamber of the barrel tooil the cartrid'ges as they pass into said chamber, a retalning member adapted to 'holdsaid means in position and passageways adapted to supply oil from an oil well to said means.

,10. In a gun, a barrel having a recess in its rear end, an-oil pad therein adapted to apply oil to the cartridges as they are inserted into the barrel and a retaining member connected with said barrel to hold said pad in position.

11; In agun, a barrel having a recess in its rear end, an oil pad therein which proj'ects slightly into the bore of -the gun adjacent the rear face of the barrel adapted to apply oil to the cartridges as they. are insorted into the barrel and a retaining memposition. v t

12. In a gun, a receiver, a barrel and means for r'otatably connecting the barrel to the receiver, an oil 'wellassociated with said means and means associated with the .bar-

- rel for'ap'plying. oil to the cartridges as a'coupling member adapted to lock said they are inserted into the barrel.

18. In a gun, a barrel, a receiverprovided at its forward end with a coupling headto which said barrel is adapted to be connected,

barrel to said head, an oil well associated with said coupling "member and receiver, and an 011 pad. associated with said barrel for applying oil to the cartridges as they are inserted into the barrel.

14:. In a gun, a barrel, a receiver provided said coupling member, an oil well associated with said handle and an oil pad located in a recess in the rear end' of said barrel for .applyingoil to the cartridges as they are inserted into the barrel.

15. In a gun, a barrel, a receiver provided at its forward end with a coupling head to which said barrel is adapted to be connected, a coupling member adapted to be placed over said head and to rotate said barrel, a handle for turning said coupling member, an oil well associated with said handle, an 'oil pad located in a recess in the rear end of said barrel for applying oil to the car tridges as they are inserted into the barrel and means for holding said pad in position,

handle, an oil pad located in a recess in the rear end of said barrel for applying oil to the cartridges as they are inserted into the v barrel and means connected with said barrel for holding said pad in position, said head, coupling member and barrel havingsuitable passages whereby oil may flow from said oilwell to said pad.

17. In a gun, an actuatorhaving an internal firing-pin chamber and a slot in the under surface of the actuator connecting said head, an oil well associated with said with said chamber for a limited distance at a the rear end of the actuator a firing pin reciprocal W1 hm said cham er and provided at its rear end with 9. depending p'ro-. jection extending through and reciprocal in Y:- said slot and means pivoted to said actuator and adapted to contact with saidprojection 'to lock the firing pin to the actuator. ber located in said recess to hold said pad' n 18. In agun, an actuator having an infor a limitedrlistance, a firing pin reciprocal within said actl'latoi and'provided at its rear through and reciprocal in said slot, a sear member pivoted tof said actuator and provided: with a pro ection adapted to make locking contact with v said firing pin projection to lock the firing pin and actuator tog-ether and a spring adapted to urge said},

ternal firing P amber opening at its rear Q end into a slot in the bottom of the actuator .120 end with a-depending projection-extending ing pin projection, a spring adapted to urge said sear member into locking engagement on said actuator and firing tripper adapted to contact with said bevel face to release said sea-r from contact with the firing pin. Y

20. In a gun,'an actuator provided with an interior projection, a bolt rotatably and.

slidably mounted on said projection, means forrotating said bolt and means for locking .said bolt on said projection.

21. In a gun," an actuator provided with. an interior projection, a bolt rotatably and slidably mounted on said projection, means for rotating said bolt, a member intheforward end of said actuator for locking said bolt on said projection and means for positioning said member in locked and unlocked engagement.

- adapted to insert said member in said bolt 1 and to withdraw the same therefrom during 1 22. In a gun, an actuator provided with an interior projection, a bolt rotatably and slidably mounted on said projection, means for rotating said bolt, a mernberinthe forward end of said actuator adapted tobe positioned in said bolt to lock said bolt on said projection and means for inserting said member in said bolt. I

23. In a gun an actuator provided with an interior projection, a bolt rotatably and slidably mounted on said projection, means for rotating said'bolt, a member in the forward end of said actuator adaptedtobe positioned in said bolt to lock said bolt and said pro-. jection, a receiver and cover therefor and camming means'associated with said cover the reciprocation of said. actuator.

24. In a gun, an actuator. having a slottherein and provided with an interior projection, a firing pin reciprocable within said actuator and provided with a projection adapted to reciprocate in said slot, means pivoted to said actuator and adapted to. contact with said firing pin projection. to. lock said firing pin to saidactuator,a boltrotatably and slidably mounted on said interior projection, means for rotating said bolt and means for locking fsaid bolt to said interior projection.

25. In a gun, an actuator jha'ving afslot therein and provided witha'n interior pro jection, a firing pin reciprocable within said actuator and provided I with a projection adapted to reciprocate in said slot, a look-- I ing member pivoted to said actuator and provided with a projection adapted to.con-- tact with said firing pin projection to lock pin and a scarsaid firing pinto said actuat0r,a spring adapted to urge said locking member against said actuator, a bolt rotatably and slidably 'mounted on said interior projection, meansfor rotating said bolt, amember inthe forward end of said actuator adapted to be positioned in. said bolt to lock said bolt on said interior projection and means"- for inserting. and withdrawing said member in ment. j,

26. In a gun, an actuator, a bolt having a spiralslot therein, a tappet member within said bolt and having a groove restricted in length. to the reciprocal movement of said and out of locking engagetappet and a member mounted on said bolt with a projection adapted to engage in said groove in the tappet t rough said spiral slot in thebolt whereby the tappet. is forced to push back the primer in the cartridge by the rotation of the bolt after thetappet has transmitted power to the actuator. I

27. In a gun, a receiver bolt having a spiral slot therein, a tappet member reciprocable in said bolt and'adapted to transmit power from the primer of thecartridge to said actuator and a member having a projection thereon. extending through said slot and adapted to move said tappet member forward wl1en.said bolt is rotated away from lockedposition in the receiver.

an actuator, a

' 28. Ina gun, an actuator, a bolt having a spiral slot therein, a tappet member recipreplace the primer in the cartridge when" said bolt is rotated from locked position-in the receiver.

29. Ina gun, a receiver provlded with-a plurality of depending portions, asubstantially hollow, cylindrical, cartridge maga' zine supported along a lon itudinal axis be-' v:

tweenztwo of said'dependmg portions and having a fluted exterior surface adapted to carry a plurality of cartridgesand provided:

.with means to rotate said magazine, a ratchet v on the rear face of said magazine,a pawl co j operating with said ratchet to restrict the rotation of said -magaaine one lateral car- .gun is fired.

30. In a gun, areceiver providedwith-a' T .pluralityof depending portions, a. substan i1 tially hollow, cylindrical,cartridgemagazine supported along a longitudinal'axis between two of said depending portions and "aving" .a-fiuted exterior surface adapted to carry a plurality of cartridges'and provided-with tridge space at a time andmeans for releasing said pawlifrom' saidratchet when. the j ported along a longitudinal axis between two of the said depending portions and having a fluted exterior surface adapted to carry a plurality of cartridges. and provided with means to rotate said magazine, a ratchet on the rear face of said magazine, a pawl cooperating with said ratchet to restrict the rotation of said magazine one lateral car tridge space at a time, means to retain the cartridges on said magazine until forced into the firing chamber by the breech mechanism and means to rotate said magazine in the operation of reloading the same with cartridges. A

32..In a g rl, a receiver provided with a plurality of depending portions, a substan tially hollow, cylindrical, cartridge magazine supported between two of said portions and having cartridge beds around its exterior surface'adapted to carry a plurality of cartridges, a s ring adapted to rotate said magazine, a rate let. on the rear face of the magazine, a pawl adapted to cooperate with said ratchet and means associated withsaid magazine adapted to control the rotation of the magazine in a movement restricted to less than one lateral cartridge space when said pawl -moves from one ratchet tooth to. the nextone. I;

33. Ina gun, an actuator, a receiver provided with a plurality of depending portlons,

a substantially hollow, cylindrical, cartridge magazine supported between two of said depending portions and having cartridge beds 'around its exterior surface adapted to carry a plurality of cartridges, a spring adapted to rotate said magazine, a ratchet on the rear face of the magazine, a pawl adapted to cooperate with said ratchet, means projecting into the path of the cartridges to restrict the rotation of'the same to less than one cartridge space when said pawl is released from said ratchet atthe moment of firing, means tov hold the u permost cartridge on the magazine in its od when the actuator goes to the rear of the magazine and means to'stop the magazine at a fixed point thereby restricting the rotation of the magazine to one revolution on its axis when loading and.

unloading the same. 1

34. In a gun, an actuator, a receiver provided with a plurality of depending portions, a substantially hollow, cylindrical, cartridge magazine supported between two of said portionsand having grooves around its outside surface adapted to carry a plurality of cartridges, a spring adapted to rotate said magazine, a ratchet on the rear face of the magazine, a pawl adapted to copin to said actuator, a trigger, a scar tripper pivoted to said receiver and adapted to release said locking means, 'a'member pivotally connected to said trigger and adapted to engage said sear tripper to rotate the same about its pivot point and a member pivoted to said receiver and to which said sear tripper is 'slidably and rotatably connected, said member being adapted to detain said firing pin as said actuator moves forward.

36.111 a gun, .a receiver, an actuator, a firing pin and means for locking said firing pin to said actuator, a trigger, a sear tripper lease said locking means, a .lever pivotally connected to said trigger and provided with a projection adapted to engage in a suitable recess in said sear tripper to rotate the same about its pivot point, a lever pivoted to said receiver" and to which said sear tripperis slidably and rotatably connected. said mem- 'ber being adapted to detain said firing 'pin the receiver and the coupling together at the same time, said grooves or channels co operating to'form an oil Well.

pivoted to said receiver and adapted to re- 88. In a gun, a receiver havinga grooved and sectionally threaded head, a barrel adapted to screw in saidhead, a detachable coupl ng member having an 011 well therein, sald receiver and barrel having passages through which oil may flow from said oil well into the firing chamber of the barrel, a spring-actuated lock adapted to lock the' coupling to the receiver when the barrel is screwed in place in said receiver head. H

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2494603 *Oct 1, 1946Jan 17, 1950Wykoff Jr Roy AFiring pin
US2539494 *Feb 12, 1947Jan 30, 1951May Summerbell EdithTube lock for guns
US2632272 *Apr 27, 1950Mar 24, 1953Zbrojovka Brno NpFirearm safety device
US2679124 *Jun 16, 1950May 25, 1954Sefried Il Harry HAssembly for the barrel, receiver, magazine, and stock of firearms
US2747313 *Feb 12, 1953May 29, 1956Remington Arms Co IncBarrel to receiver connection on a firearm
US2774283 *Jun 14, 1954Dec 18, 1956Harvey Earle MBreech mechanism for a firearm
US3122060 *Aug 23, 1962Feb 25, 1964Reed Frederick PCooperating firing and indexing devices for revolver-type firearms
US3745687 *Apr 7, 1971Jul 17, 1973Firearm Dev IncRotary magazine for bolt action rifle
US4942802 *Sep 24, 1987Jul 24, 1990Ares, Inc.Convertible, belt/clip-fed automatic gun with positive shell casing ejection
US5412895 *Mar 9, 1993May 9, 1995Krieger; John M.Floating gun barrel mount
US7000345 *Jul 11, 2002Feb 21, 2006Kay Ira MUnderbarrel shotgun
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US7886470Mar 28, 2008Feb 15, 2011Doiron Gerald JBolt assembly for a firearm
EP0115034A1 *Dec 21, 1983Aug 8, 1984Horst Blaser JagdwaffenfabrikRifle with replaceable barrel
Classifications
U.S. Classification89/132, 42/19, 42/69.2, 42/106, 42/75.2, 89/185, 89/179, 89/1.25
International ClassificationF41A21/48, F41A9/82, F41A21/00, F41A29/00, F41A29/04, F41A9/26, F41A9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A21/484, F41A21/482, F41A9/82, F41A9/26, F41A29/04
European ClassificationF41A21/48F, F41A9/82, F41A29/04, F41A21/48D, F41A9/26