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Publication numberUS1696688 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1928
Filing dateSep 28, 1926
Priority dateSep 28, 1926
Publication numberUS 1696688 A, US 1696688A, US-A-1696688, US1696688 A, US1696688A
InventorsPeiler Karl E
Original AssigneeHartford Empire Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mold for high-temperature casting of refractory bodies
US 1696688 A
Abstract  available in
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

v .s -1,696,688' j-UNITED STATES RA ur OFFICE.

mar. E. PEILEB, or wnsr m'rronn, oemcrrcur, Assmnon 'ro marroan- EMPIRE COMPANY, 01' HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, -A CORPORATION 01' DELAWARE.

morn non nren-rmnaa'ruan mania or mmc'ronr norms.

Io Drawing. i

My invention relates to molds for refractory bodies at high temperatures an has special reference to molds for casting fused refractory bodies, typically consisting of mullite and a vitreousmatrix, which must be melted and cast at high temperatures,

. exceeding 3200 F.

The object of niyinvention is-to provide an improved mold of'thecharacter indicated, .which can be used repeatedly and which shall be mechanically stronger and less subject to corrosion in use than .the molds which have heretofore been employed for similar purposes.

The present invention proposes to use for making such molds a material consisting of fused silica. and a c'alcium silicate bond, this material being prepared by mixing comminuted fused silica with lime, molding the mixture into the desired molds or mold parts, and heating the molded articles "to harden them. Such heating may be done by steaming under pressure,-or by burning inakiln.

It has been customar heretofore to"employ sand molds for casting fused refractory bodies at high temperatures. Suchsand molds have been, prepared. from quartz sand 3 and a binder of. oil 'or' the like. Such sand molds disintegrate readily-under the conditions ofuse, and, therefore, such a mold can be used once only. Also, such a sand mold -is not mechanically strong and since sand molds of this kind must be made anew for each article that is cast, their labor cost is considerable. They have the further disadvanta es thatthe quartz sand combines more or' ess with thecast material, and also,

that the quartz sand expands and contracts considerably with changes in temperature, so-

that casting in such molds at very elevated temperatures is accompanied by agreater orv less distortion. of the mold.

Fused silica differs fromguartz s d in that it hasa very low coeflicient of expansion and it is substantially more resistant than quartz sand to corrosion by molten remfractory materals. When bonded in the manner described herein, it has sufiicient mechanical strength to withstand repeated lfise, and it presents a smooth molding surace.

An im ortant advantage of using fused silicarat er than the natural rock orany.

crystallized form is that thefusedsilica a substantial portion-in an amorphous formand thus has the abovementioned very low coefiicient of expanionand relatively high resistance to corrosion'by molten refractory materals.

In preparing molds according to my present invention, fused silica is comminuted to a suitable degree of fineness, preferably at least fine enough to pass through a 20-mesh screen, and this comminuted fused silica is mixed with ground quicklime or waterslacked lime. be used in the mixture and I preferthat 15 to 20 parts of lime be used with85 to 80 parts of fused silica. I'also prefer to employ qmcklime as a sta .m s'iterial almay be used, if desired.

The dry mixture of fused silica and lime 1s wetted sufficiently for molding. I prefer .to mold this material b dry-pressing methods, for which purposet ematerial shouldlcom tain not. over 12% of water and is pressed in molds under heavy hy raulic pressure.

'The molded material 's thenheated for the purpose of harde 'ng it. The heatsix to eighthours, or longer, under a sub stantial pressure, which ma be ofthe order of 40 pounds per square inc siderably higher if desired.

The heat-treatment of the molded material may be carried out by burning in a kiln at a tem erature of the order of 2200 F., with- At least 6%of lime should Y or may be conoutt e use of steam. In either case, the heat-treatment causes a portion of the silica to combine with .the lime, producing a bond consisting mainly of calcium metasllicate with other calcium silicates.

The molds manufactured in the manner described above may be made either in one piece or in slabs to be assembled together to form the molds. a

In the appended claims, the term .hme is intended to include both water-slashed lime.v

I claim as my invention:

1. A mold for high-temperature casting,

composed of comminuted fused silica bonded with calcium silicate material.

2. A mold. for high-temperature casting,

composed of-comminuted fusedsilica and lime molded under pressure and hardened by heat. y s p quicklime and temperature casting,

hardening the temperature-casting, that comprises mixing comminuted fused silica and comminuted lime, adding sufiicient water for molding, molding the resulting mixture, and harden ing the molded material by heat.

4. The process of making a mold for high that comprises mix-- ing comminuted fused silica and comminuted lime, adding suflicient water for dry-pressing, dry-pressing the resulting mixture, and

molded material by heat.

'5. The process of making a mold for hightemperature casting, that comprises mixing comminuted fused silica and comminuted lime, adding sufficient water for molding, molding the resulting mixture and hardening the molded material by treatment with steam under pressure.

6. The process of making a mold for hightemperature casting, that comprises mixing comminuted fused silica and comminuted lime, adding suflicient water for dry pressing, dry-pressing the resulting mixture and hardening the molded material by treatment with steam under ressure.

. 7. The process of making a mold for hightemperature casting, that comprises mixing 80 to 85 parts of fused silica, comminuted to at least 20-mesh fineness, with 20 to parts of comminuted lime, adding sui'fi cient water for molding, molding the resulting mixture, and hardening the molded material by heat.

. 8. Theprocess of making a mold for high temperature casting, that comprises mixing .80to 85 parts of fused silica, comminuted to at least QO-mesh fineness with to 15 parts of comminuted lime, adding sulficient water for dry pressing, dry pressing of steam.

the resulting mixture and hardening the molded material by heat. 7 9. The vprocess ofmaking a mold for high temperature casting, that comprises mixing 80: to 85 parts minuted to at least ZO-mesh fineness with 20 to 15 parts of comminuted lime, adding suflicient water for molding, ing mixture and hardening the molded material by heat in the presence of steam. 10. The process of making a mold for high temperature casting, that comprises mixing 80 to 85 parts of fused silica, comminuted to at least 20-mesh fineness with 20 to 15 parts of comminuted lime, adding suflicient water for dry pressing, dry pressing the'resultin'g mixture, and hardening the molded material by heat in the presence of steam.

11. The process of making a mold for high temperature casting, that comprises mixing comminuted fused silica, of which a. material portion is amor hens, and comminuted lime, adding su cient water for molding, molding the resulting mixture and hardening the-molded material by treatment with steam under pressure.

12. The process of makin a mold for high temperature casting, t at comprises mixing 80 to 85 parts of fused silica, 0 which a material portion is amorphous, comminuted to at least 20-mesh fineness, with '20 to 15 parts ofcomminuted lime, adding suflicient water for dry pressing, dry pressing the resulting mixture, and hardening the molded material by heat in the presence Signed at Hartford, Connecticut this th day of September, 1926.

. KARL E. PEILER.

of fused silica, commolding the result-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2889229 *Mar 2, 1955Jun 2, 1959Didier Werke AgProcess for the manufacture of fire resistant material containing silicates
US2973278 *May 15, 1958Feb 28, 1961Jakubczak ArthurManufacture of sintered vitreous silica
US4900703 *Nov 2, 1988Feb 13, 1990Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Method for producing ceramics with thermal shock resistance
Classifications
U.S. Classification106/38.3, 501/154, 501/133
International ClassificationB28B1/54, B28B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB28B1/54
European ClassificationB28B1/54