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Publication numberUS1698891 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1929
Filing dateNov 9, 1922
Priority dateNov 9, 1922
Publication numberUS 1698891 A, US 1698891A, US-A-1698891, US1698891 A, US1698891A
InventorsFrederick C Overbury
Original AssigneeFlintkote Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Strip roofing unit and process of manufacture
US 1698891 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 15, 1929.

F. C. OVERBURY STRIP'ROOFINGUNIT AND P RocEss oF MANUFAGTURE Filed Nov. 9, 1922 lll Patented Jan. 15, 1929.

UNITED sTATEsf'PATaNT OFFICE.

FREDERICK C. OVERBURY, OF EILLSD'ALE, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR T0 THE FLINTKOTE COMPANY, 0F BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION OF MASSACHUSETTS.

STRIP ROOFING UNIT AND PROCESS OF MANUFACTURE.

Application 1ed`November 9, 1922. Serial No. 599,871.

This invention relates to roofing and the process of manufacture whereby a rooting constructed of fibrous material such as felt impregnated with water resistant material may be made to present a substantial appearance on the roof without requiring that the material from which it is made shall be of more than ordinary thickness, the material preferably being made u in strip form and each strip simulating a p urality of individual roofing units.

For this purpose the material is folded in such a manner that the portion exposed to the weather is at least twice its normal thickness, the two or more layers being so united as to form a substantially integral structure. The strip may be surfaced as by the application of granular material thereto to improve its weather-resisting qualities.

For a more complete understanding of this invention reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in which Figure lrepresents in perspective a piece of roofing material in strip form.

Figure 2 shows a piece of the strip folded preparatory to forming into the finished strip units.

Figure 3 is a 'View similar to Figure 2, but showing edge notches in the strip to form tabs simulating shingles.

Figures 4 and 5 are perspectives before and after folding, respectively, showing another method of cutting the tabs.

Figures 6, 8, and l0 are fragmentary plans howing other forms in which the sheet may e cut. l

Figures 7, 9, and 11 are perspectives showing the sheets cut as in Figures 6, 8, and 10, respectively, and partially folded to their finished forms.

Figures 12 and 13 show still another manner of cutting and folding the material.

A. strip of felt as shown `in Figure 1 at 1,

tending from the folded edge 7 at least to the upper edges of the notches 3. As shown in these figures the lower layer extends co-tcrminous with the upper layer. Y

.lf the sheet material has 4been saturated only before the folding is effected, it is then coated with the coating asphalt in the usual manner so that the two layers of the double thick unit become united together in a. substantially integral structure. 1n case the coating has been applied before the sheet is folded, it is preferable to pass the unit between heated rollers in order that the coatings may imite where the upper and lower layers are in contact so that they may be firmly united.

ln Figure 3 the notches 3 are shown as cut entirely through b oth layers-of material. if desired, however, they may be made to pass through only the upper layer as shown for example in Figures 4 and 5, in which case the notches 30.1nay be cut in the material, before is folded and extend in one direction to the line of fold at 10 so that when the material is folded as shown in Figure 5 the notches 30 are entirely underlaid with the lower layer of the material and they extend to the folded edge 10 which is exposed to the weather.

Various other ways of cutting the material may be employed in order to produce varying designs of the finished material, for example, in Figures 6 and slots 31 extending across the fold line-12 are shown. The material is' then folded as indicated in Figure 7 crosswise of the slots forming rectangular tabs similar to those shown in Figure 3. In Figures 8 and 9 somewhat diamond shaped openings 32 symmetrically disposed on either side of the fold line at 13 are shown,

the material when folded presenting hex?A agonal ended tabs 33 as shown in Figure 9.

In Figures 10 and 11 substantially hexagonal cut-outs 35 are employed adjacent one e ge of the material. It is then folded about the line 14 symmetrically related to the opening35 to form when folded the hexa onal tabs 36 of Figure 11, the lower layer 3 in this construction extending only to the 'upper edge of the cut-out portions. i

In Figures 12 and 13 a further modification i is shown in which the materia-l is folded twice, for example, first-along the line 15 to form a layer 16 and then again in the same direction along the line 17 to forma layer 18, both underlying .the main portion of the sheet as shown in Figure 13, the portion 16 lying between the body of the sheet and the portion 18. In this case, as shown, slots 2O are cut through the upper layer of the material and .underlaid by the layers 16 and 18. In this form the portion exposed to the Weather is of triple thickness While extending therefrom is a single thickness for underlying the adjacent course. While as shown rectangular notches are employed passing through the outer layeIx-.or thickness of the material, it is evident 'that they could if desired be cut through one lthe Weather. The portion 16 may also be coated With granular material if desired,'this being particularly desirable Where the notches .12() extend only through the body portion of the sheet, the granular material being then exposed beneath the notches 20. It is also to be noted that the underlying layers of the material extend at least to the upper edges of the cut-outs and that the Whole unit is so formed that the layers are united, as for eX- ample by the asphaltic material Witllwhich they are`impregnated or coated, or both, to

form a substantially unitary construction.

Without visible seams. The provision of the folded edge of the layers to be exposed to the Weather prevents any possibility of moisture finding its Way to any improperly impregnated felt Within the body of the material and the various layers so united form a oo nstruction which will not curl or Warp in use.

The strips illustrated in the drawing are shown as of a length equal to that of the cus- For tomary strip shingle, but it is obvious that these may be cut by transverse cuts into shorter finished elements; or a longer strilp than shown may be slotted, folded and slit, t en cut transversely into finished elements of desired length.

' While two and three folded layers have been shown, it is of course evident that more layers might be employed if desired Without departing from the spirit or scope of this invention and that various other changes and modifications might be made Without departing from the scope ofthe invention as defined by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. The method of making rooin `*which comprises folding opposite edges o a iece of sheet 'material over against one face t ereof, then cutting said folded sheet into roofing units'.

2. Thek method of making roofing which comprises folding opposite edges of a iece of sheet material over against one face tereof, then cutting said folded sheet in two between said edges and each portion into roofing units. f

3. The method of making roofing which comprises folding opposite edges of a piece of sheet material over against one face thereof, then cutting said folded sheet into roofing units the edges formed by the folding operation forming the edges exposed to the Weather when the units are laid.

4. The method of making roofing which comprises folding opposite side edges of a strip of sheet material against the face thereof, notching out the folded edges to form individual roofing unit simulating tabs, and cuttin said sheet longitudinally intermediate .sai folded edges and transverselyinto desired lengths.

In testimony whereof I have affixed my signature.

FREDERICK o. ovERBURr.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3077848 *Feb 25, 1960Feb 19, 1963Universal American CorpMethod of forming a pull rod
US3122954 *Jun 14, 1961Mar 3, 1964 Venetian blind slats
US4404783 *Nov 17, 1980Sep 20, 1983Bennie FreiborgMulti purpose roof piece
US4639997 *Jul 18, 1985Feb 3, 1987Tensiodyne Scientific CorporationMethod of making a device for monitoring fatigue life
US4869942 *Dec 21, 1987Sep 26, 1989The Celotex CorporationTrilaminated roofing shingle
US5052162 *May 10, 1990Oct 1, 1991The Celotex CorporationRoofing shingle
US6174403Sep 4, 1998Jan 16, 2001Certainteed CorporationMuli-layered and colored shingle and method of making same
US6220329Mar 17, 1998Apr 24, 2001Tamko Roofin ProductsApparatus for making laminated roofing shingles
US6355132May 3, 1999Mar 12, 2002Certainteed CorporationMulti-layered shingle and method of making same
US6481259 *Aug 17, 2000Nov 19, 2002Castle, Inc.Method for precision bending of a sheet of material and slit sheet therefor
US6544374Dec 18, 2000Apr 8, 2003Tamko Roofing ProductsMethod for making laminated roofing shingles
US6679020Nov 26, 2001Jan 20, 2004Certainteed CorporationMulti-layered shingle and method of making same
US6679308Dec 30, 2002Jan 20, 2004Certainteed CorporationMulti-layered shingle and method of making same
US6877349Sep 26, 2002Apr 12, 2005Industrial Origami, LlcMethod for precision bending of sheet of materials, slit sheets fabrication process
US6920730Jan 13, 2004Jul 26, 2005Certainteed CorporationMulti-layered shingle and method of making same
US6933037Sep 18, 1997Aug 23, 2005Tamko Roofing ProductsTriple laminate roofing shingle
US7032426Jun 4, 2004Apr 25, 2006Industrial Origami, LlcForming slits, grooves along longitudinal axis; three-dimensional structure
US7152449Sep 26, 2003Dec 26, 2006Industrial Origami, LlcTechniques for designing and manufacturing precision-folded, high strength, fatigue-resistant structures and sheet therefor
US7152450Mar 3, 2004Dec 26, 2006Industrial Origami, LlcMethod for forming sheet material with bend controlling displacements
US7222511Nov 9, 2004May 29, 2007Industrial Origami, Inc.Process of forming bend-controlling structures in a sheet of material, the resulting sheet and die sets therefor
US7263869Aug 31, 2004Sep 4, 2007Industrial Origami, Inc.Method for forming sheet material with bend controlling grooves defining a continuous web across a bend line
US7350390Mar 14, 2005Apr 1, 2008Industrial Origami, Inc.Sheet material with bend controlling displacements and method for forming the same
US7354639Dec 16, 2004Apr 8, 2008Industrial Origami, Inc.Method of bending sheet materials and sheet therefor
US7374810Sep 27, 2004May 20, 2008Industrial Origami, Inc.Method for precision bending of sheet of materials, slit sheets fabrication process
US7412865Mar 13, 2006Aug 19, 2008Industrial Origami, Inc.Method for forming sheet material with bend controlling displacements
US7440874Apr 8, 2004Oct 21, 2008Industrial Origami, Inc.Method of designing fold lines in sheet material
US7464574Apr 25, 2006Dec 16, 2008Industrial Origami, Inc.Method for forming sheet material with bend facilitating structures into a fatigue resistant structure
US7534501Mar 16, 2006May 19, 2009Industrial Origami, Inc.Precision-folded, high strength, fatigue-resistant structures and sheet therefor
US7560155Aug 21, 2007Jul 14, 2009Industrial Origami, Inc.Sheet material with bend controlling grooves defining a continuous web across a bend line and method for forming the same
US7643967Oct 30, 2007Jan 5, 2010Industrial Original, Inc.Method of designing fold lines in sheet material
US8377566Jan 20, 2011Feb 19, 2013Industrial Origami, Inc.Precision-folded, high strength, fatigue-resistant structures and sheet therefor
US8438893Aug 30, 2010May 14, 2013Industrial Origami, Inc.Method of forming two-dimensional sheet material into three-dimensional structure
US8505258Feb 8, 2008Aug 13, 2013Industrial Origami, Inc.Load-bearing three-dimensional structure
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/412, 83/29, 29/557, 52/559, 52/557
International ClassificationE04D1/00, E04D1/26
Cooperative ClassificationE04D2001/005, E04D1/26
European ClassificationE04D1/26