Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1699069 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1929
Filing dateJun 9, 1924
Priority dateJun 9, 1924
Publication numberUS 1699069 A, US 1699069A, US-A-1699069, US1699069 A, US1699069A
InventorsFelix Huntar
Original AssigneeFelix Huntar
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Can-double-seaming machine
US 1699069 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 15, 1929. 1,699,069

F. HUNTAR Y GAN DOUBLE SEAMING MACHINE Filed June 9. 1924 6 sheets-sheet 1 MYMJK Sirona@ Jan. 15, 11929. 1,699,069 F.HUNTAR CAN DOUBLE SEAMING MACHINE `Filed June 9, s shee`ts-sheet 2 @not u 114 Jan. 15, 1929. Y 1,699,069

F. HUNTAR CAN DOUBLE SEAMING MACHINE Filed June 9, 1924 6 Sheets-Sheet 4` rgb? .7 d l/l4/ @Henley Jan. l5, 1929. 1,699,069

F. HUNTAR CAN DOUBLE-` SEAMING MACHINE Filed June 9. 1924 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Z22 /x HUNT/7T Jan. l5, 1929. i 1,699,069

F. HUNTAR CAN DOUBLE SEAMING MACHINE Filed June 9, 1924 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 ffy' WWW l JV. r 49 9 1 s, 26 i M /5 /4 M t J /20 M9 25 z5 PatentedA Jan.' l5, 1929.

UNITED STATES FELIX HUNTAB, F HILLSIDE, NEW JBSEY.

CAN-DOUBLE-SEAMING MACHINE.

Application fil-ed J'une 9,

This invention relates to seaming machines, and more particularly to can double-seeming machines.

In the canning industry, particularly in canning of perishable food products, such as fresh i'ruit, vegetables, fish, etc., it is essential to seal the cans as soon as possible after the product is processed and packed. In some instances, a few hours delay in sealing the cans causes the spoilage and total loss of 2U of the can, requiring additional operations i to clean the can after closing.

There are two types of closing machines in general use, the intermittent motion feed, and continuous motion feed machines. In the intermittent motion feed machines, the cans are fed closely spaced into the machine and the necessary time for seaming 1s provided by the dwell of the feed. This type machine is of very lov;7 capacity, as it is impossible to operate it at high speed without spilling.

In the continuous feed closing machine, the cans are gradually separated to a .considerable distance, this wide can spacing being necessary to accommodate the location of seaming heads, as on this type of closingmachine, the seaming heads are located in a circle that revolves, as an integral part of the can feeding mechanism. This type 'of inachine is superior to the intermittent motion machine, but it has its limitations due to the necessity of wide can s acing. In spacing cans filled with liquid, it 1s very diiicult to accelerate the can velocity without spilling, as even a slight jerk is suilicient touagitate the liquid and cause it to flow over. On present machines, the cans are generally delivered to the seamin station by means of prongs or turrets simp y by dragging the can on a sta.- tionary support. The friction between the moving can and stationary support `vibrates the can, causing agitation of the liquid and consequently the spill.

' The seaming station of a closing machine 1924. Serial No. 718,980.

.is the most important mechanism, and it must always function perfectly as the least defect due to wear or accident, ties up the entire ca nniiig operation. This is particularly true with present machines in use, as the construction is such that it is impossible to eliminate one or more seaming stations and continue the operation of the machine. Therefore, every caiiner whose output is limited to the capacity of one machine is obliged to carry another machine in reserve for emergency.

My invention yrelates in general to multistation double-seaming machines and, while trom certain aspects has more particular application to double-scanning the lled cans, it will be manifest as the invention is better understood that from other aspects it has valuable uses in the can factory for seaniing of the can bottoms as well.. v

A principal object of my invention is the provision of -a wholly automatic, highly ef- 75 ticient double-seeming machine for circular cans, and of new and improved construction.

Another highly important object of my nvention is the provision of an apparatus of this character which will insure the continued operation of the machine when one or more seeming stations become disabled.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a novel electro-magnetic can spacing and can retaining means while the cans are being carried to seaming stations.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a machine of the kind which, by changing of a small number of parts, may be adapted for the seaming of cans of varying 9o height and diameter. Y

In the accompan g drawings, I Ahave shown several embodiiiiientsof the invention. In this showing: l

Figure 1 is a central vertical sectional view,

Figure 2 is a horizontalsectionalview on line 2-2 of Figure 1, i

Figure 3 is a diagrammatic illustration of a modified form,of the invention Figure 4 is an enlarged view of the seamng head in cross section on line 4 4 o'f Fi re 7,

Figure 5 is a diagrammatic plan view of seaming roll adjusting sleeves,

Figure 6 is a diagrammatic plan view of the seaming links and arms,

Figure 7 is a horizontal sectional view on line 7--7 of Figure 4, i

Figure 8 is a detail perspective view of a pair of knives forming a part of the cover feeding mechanism,

Figure 9 is a vertical sectional view of the cover marker,

' Figure 10 is a detail sectional view on line 10-10 of Figure 2, j

Figure 11 is a vertical sectional view along the center of the path of the cover at right angles to section line 10-10,

Figure 12 is a detail View of a member forming a part ofl the can lifting mechanism,

Figure 13 is a vertical sectional view in substantially the same plane as Figure 1, showing part of the mechanism on an enlarged scale, and, v

Figures 14, 15, and 16 are sectional details indicating the operation of the seaming rolls in forming the double seam.

Referring to Figure 2 of the drawings, there is provided a number of seaming stations 1, 2, and 3, arranged concentric to the center of the machine and so positioned with respect to a revolving turret 4 that each seaming station makes one complete revolution to a quarter turn of the turret. The seaming stations are provided with pockets, 5, 6, and 7 of a proper size to receive the can and the turret is provided with a number of pockets 8.'

In this instance, twelve pockets are provided on the turret. As the seaming stations make a complete revolution to each quarter revolution of the turret, the pockets 5, v6, and 7 are alined with every fourth pocket of the turret. Cans 9 are arranged in the pocketsof the turret, and are adapted to be received. in the pockets 5, 6, and 7. Covers 10 are brought into vertical alinement with the can by means to be described. As shown, the can and cover are spaced a considerable distance fromeach other (see Figure 1), when the can first enters the seaming station. A pressing pad 11 is arranged above the cover, and a rod 12 is secured to this pad. This rod engages astationary cam 13 (see Figures 1 and 13) to assemble a can and cover, as indicated in F igure 4 of the drawings. After this action has taken place, the can and cover are adapted tlo be lifted by a lifting member 14 arranged beneath the seaming station. A tubular lever 15 is connected to the lifting member and a lever 16 (see Figure 12) is pivotallymounted on a suitable support 17 and is provided with a forked end 18 having pins 19 engaging the opposite sides of the lever. A cam 20 is provided with a roove 21 adapted to receive a vroller 22, carried by the pivoted lever 16 to raise the lifting member and the can. This raises the can and cover into a position immediately below a sealing chuck 23. A hollow shaft 24 is arranged within the tubular l lever 15h and this shaft is provided with a pin- `ion 25. keyed thereto. ranged within the hollow shaft and keyedA A spindle 26 is arthereto. The seaming station continuously .upper portion of the seaming station is driven through a pinion 28 from a central gear 29. After the can has been raised to a position immediately below the chuck 23, the seaming operation is performed. The performance of the se'aming operation takes place during the greater part of the revolution of the seaming station on its axis. When the lifter starts downwardly with a finished can, the can is ejected by a revolving ejector arm 30, (see Figure 2) and the station is ready to repeat the operation on the next can.

The cans are delivered from a suitable conveyor (not shown) to a rotating disk 31 (see Figures 1 and 2) in unrestricted position as regards spacing from can to can. It is, therefore, necessary to space and accelerate the can velocity before delivering the cans to the turret 4. A selecting disk 32 is arranged between the disk 31 and the turret.- A plurality of electromagnets 33 equal in number to the number of pockets on the turret, are arranged around the periphery of the selecting disk. Vanes 34 are arranged beneath the disk substantially in horizontal alinement with the feeding disk 31 (see Figure 1 The selecting mechanism is driven at t e same speed as the turret. Each of the vanes 34 is provided with a lug 35, adapted to engage the edge of the can. The vanes 34 are pivotally mounted on a turn-table 36. As shown, the turn-table is provided with bearings 37 adapted to receive pins 38 carried by the vanes. An arm 39 is secured to each of these pins and these arms ride in a cam groove formed in' a stationary disk 40. The selecting disk 32 is eccentrically mounted and is driven through a sliding coupling 41.

As shown in Figure 2 of the drawings, the I feeding disk 31 delivers the. cans to the osition indicated by the reference numera s 42 and 43, and the cans are then attracted by the magnets 33 of the selecting disk 32 and follow the path of this disk. If the can is delivered too late to be attracted by the magnet, it remains on the feeding disk 31, as indicated at 44, and returns to the delivery point merging with the incoming cans to repeat its travel toward the selectin disk. To avoid any jamming of the cans, t e machine is operated at a slightly greater speed than -the conveyor or lling machine, providing ample space for unselected cans to merge into the lines of cans being fed. The lugs 35 on "i cans from the magnets to rmit them to be delivered to the turret. his arrangement permits a continuous current to be maintained in the magnets. As the can is advanced by the vane 34, due to the cam 40, the can velocity in a radial path is accelerated to the same as the turret so that when the can is, transferred to the turret at the position 46, its velocity is the same as the turret speed, eliminating possibility of spill during the transfer. Each turret pocket is provided with a vdepending arm 47 and a lower horizontal arm 48, forming a can support'. Electro-magnets 49 are arranged adjacent the can supports to maintain the cans inthe pockets. Particular attention is called to the fact that from the time the can is delivered to the feeding disk 31, it is carried Without any sliding or dragging motion, eliminating the possibility of spi ing the contents and insuring a smooth action.

llurrent is delivered to the magnets on the turret by lead Wires 50 and 51, connected to suitable terminals 52. The magnets 33 are supplied with current through leads 54, connected to terminals on the selecting disk. The magnets 33eme connected in parallel and each magnet is provided with a suitable control switch (not shown).

s stated above, each seeming stationregisters with every fourth pocket on the turret. Pls the selecting disk is provided-with the same number of magnets as the number of pockets in the turret, the delivery of cans to any seeming station may be discontinued by 67 and 68`are arranged at the `bottom of the l magazine andare adapted'to'se aratethe bottom cover from the remain er of the Y stack of covers in the magazine.- The detail construction of ,these knives is shown in Figure 8 of the drawings. As shown, the knives are carried at the ends of, a substantially semi-circular yoke 69, having an arm arranged betweenthe knives, andthe end of this arm is provided withva sleeve 71. Adjacent each of the pockets 65, the turrent is rovided with a lug 7 2 adapted to engage the ottoni cover as it 1s separated from the stack by one of the knivesafnd carry it towardthe When the turret 62 and turret 4 register at the pointl indicated by the numeral in Figure @of the drawings, the cover is picked up by the electro-magnets in the pockets of e turret 4 and carried forward with the the-proper seeming station. r

`During the penod that the cover is stationary in the markingstation, that is, after the lug 72 passes over the cover and until disconnecting every fourth magnetic unit of *the pocket 65 comes inpositionto receive the the selecting disk, corresponding to the particular station. The importance of this feature will be apparent when it is considered that any of the seaming stations may be put ont oi operation for repair or similar purposes and the remainder of themachine emplayed in its normal manner. The generator may be run by the machine to furnish the current to energize the ma ets 33 and 49. As shown, the machineis rivenfrom any suitable source of power by means of a pulley 56 and a. gear 57 may be mounted on the -pul-l f ley hub. The generator '(not shown)' is provided with a shaft 58, having a'gear'59 meshl spring arel connected to the shaft and tothe ing with the pinion 57 on the' pulley. By

' arrangling the generator drive onthe hub of The cover the pu ley, thegenerator will' continue` to' opcrate as long Aas the pulleyis in motion, irrespective of whether theclut'ch is inengagement or is disconnected ,from the drive shaft60. e j, feed mechanism'is driven by a .gear 61`('seeFigure 10), which meshes with the main drive gear 27 of the lower portion of the seeming station (see Figure 1). 'A turret 62'is mounted on the upper end of a shaft 63 to which the gear 61 is secured and this turret is provided with lockets 65, adapted to receive the covers. e covers are arranged in a magazme 66 and a pair of knives markinrghoperation, which willv of a cam 80, Vmounted on the shaft 63. A4

lever 81 is connected to the cam by means of a pin`82 which `rides the groove of the cam and the other end, of this lever is connected to an arm 8 3 by a lnkv84. The arm 83 is rovided with a sleeve 85 on its other end, a apted to surround a shaft 86. Springs 87 and 88 aremounted on the shaft on o posits sides of the sleeve. The endsV of t e arm 83V respectively. It will, therefore, be

llt)

shaft 86,; greater than the tension of spring.'

87'or V88, the arm 8,3 travel forwardlyf .I twisting either sprin andthe shaft will re- 120 i is construction serves main stationary.v f

as a safety means to prevent damage' to the f cover and separating mechanism an alsoactsY asa positive controlfor separating the`cov-'- i ers when the machine is in motion. The` shaft 86 is normally retained 'inv locked position by a latch 89. A lug 90 is carricd on'the Y t lower end of this shaft, and this lug is either n in the position shown in, Figure 10 ofthe drawings or in the position 9 advancing knife enters the magazine, the re- The covers in the magazine 66 are retained in an inclined position by the lmives. As the ceding 'knife still retains the covers in an inclined position. As the separated cover is removed by the lug 72 and knife 67, the

stack of covers rests on a support 92 on the4 opposite side of the magazine and the knife 67. A similar support 93 is arranged on the 'opposite side of the magazine to cooperate with the knife 68. The pawl 89 which locks the shaft 86 is controlled by a solenoid 94, and a trip lever 20', Figure 2. This trip lever is provided with suitable contact points so that when a passing can comes .in contact with the lever, a circuit is closed and solenoid 94 depresses the pawl 89 through a plunger 95, releasing the cover separating mechanism to cut off one cover, which is finally delivered at the point 75 in Figure 2 of the drawingsf by a pair of eccentrics 97 and 98, mounted on a shaft 99. This shaft is provided with a bevel gear 100, meshing with a bevel gear 101 to drive the marker. The upper jaw 76 is reciprocated and the lower jaw 77 is made in the form of a plunger and is also reciprocated.

The eccentric 98 is provided with a strap 102,

the upper end of which is connected to a threaded rod 103. This rod is received within a tubular member 104 and the tubular .'member is provided with a pin 105, adapted tween the nut and the head 107. The lower end of the jaw 77 is provided with a slot 109, adapted to receive a portion 110 of the head 107. The head is secured to the jaw by a pin 111. The jaw 76 is mounted on a substantially U-shaped member 112, provided with a depending portion 113, which receives the lower jaw and the lower jaw operating mechanism. This depending portion is connected to a strap 114 carried by the eccentric 97 by arms (not shown). An adjustable stop 115 is arrangedV within the depending member 113. This member is provided for the purpose of controlling the depth of the lmpression in the cover and also acts as a safety means to avoid scoring the cover when the dies are of uneven depth. It is ada ted to be adjusted so that on the upstrokeof t e plunger 77, it is engaged by an abutment 116,

, formed on the lower end of the plunger. This stops the movement of the plunger and the excessive stroke of the eccentric 98 is taken up by the spring 109.

Referring to Figures 1 and13 of the drawings, the seaming station is provided with a head-frame 117, which is supported in suitable lbea-rings 118 and-119. This frame revolves on the axis of the shaft 26 and carries the entire seaming mechanism. When a can is delivered to the seaming station, the can and cover are assembled as shown in Figure 4 of the drawings, and are brought in contact with the chuck 23. The seamlng operation extends through the greater part of the revolution of the seaming station on its axis.

Referring to Figures 14, 15 and 16 of the drawings, the seaming is a spinning operation performed in a gradual way to Yinsure a smooth and tight joint lbetween the can and the cover. The seaming operation is performed in two steps.. With the can and cover -in position beneath the chuck, as shown in Figure 14 of the drawings, seaming rolls 119 located on diametrically. opposite sides advance toward the can, curling the cover as indicated at 120 in Figure 15 of the drawings. After the curling or rst operation, another pair of rolls 121 are brought in contact with the curled edge of the cover and the flange of the can and the curled seam is flattened out to produce the double seam 122 shown in Figure' 16 of the drawings. At the completion of this operation, the lifter or can support 14 starts on the downward stroke and the-can is carried away by the arm 30.

The chuck is supported on a chuck spindle 123 rigidly mounted in the headI frame 117. The chuck is arranged within a seam.- ing head 124 and this head and a sleeve 125 are revolved on the vertical axis of the chuck spindle through gears 126 and 127, carried by the head and the sleeve respectively (see Figures 1 and 13). The head gear 126 is driven by an internal gear 128 so proportioned that when the seaming station completes a rev'oluf tion on its axis, the head gear completes ten revolutions. The sleeve 125 in the meantime completes eleven revolutions. The gear 127 meshes with an internal gear 129 arranged above the internal gear 128.

Referring to Figure 4 of the drawings, the

seaming sleeve 125 is provided with eccentrics 130 and 131 located on diametrically opposite sides. Each eccentric operates an adjacent pair of seaming rolls through links 132, 133, 134, and 135, diagrammatically illustrated in Figure 6 of the drawings. The reciprocating movement is imparted to the seaming rolls, due to the dilerential speed between the seaming head 124 and the seaming sleeve 125, as previously described, their respective speeds being ten and eleven revolutions. A similar result may be obtained at any other speed as long as there is a difference in speed between the seaming head tract before 137, representing the second.y

eration roll, is brought in contact with tige can. The rolls-119 are mounted on spindles 138 and these spindles are provided with adinstable means consisting of eccentric sleeves 139 and 140.`

`of diiferent diameters.

Referring to Figure 5 ofthe drawings, it will be noted that when sleeves 139 and 140 are turned in opposite directions, the spindle 138 will advance in a straight line as indicated. This permits adjustment of the seaming roll 119 toward and away from the axis of the seaming station, permitting the use of the apparatus with cans of varying diameters without displacing the seaming roll from its fixed radial location which is very important on account of head timing.

The outer eccentric sleeve 139 is supported in rocking arms 141and '142. These arms are pivoted lon a bearing 143 and may be adjusted `by means of a worm 144 (see Figure 7). The

eccentric sleeves 139 and 14() are provided lwith suitable markings on their upper ends, as indicated at 147 and 148 to facilitate quick scttiinlr of the roll 119 to accommodate cans The arm'145 is connected to a link 149 by a pin 150, and this link is pivotally mounted on a stud 151 extending through the bearing 143.

.After ltheseeming rolls have been set, the arm and the link 149 will occupy the po sition 152 in Figure 7 of the drawin s. By swinging the arm and link to the position 153, the seeming roll is thrown outof engagement with the can dueto the eccentricity of the sleeve 140. This permits any roll to be disengaged from the can and rendered inoperative without losing the correctrsetting posi tions, for example, three rolls may be disengaged to examine the function of the fourth roll and by simply resetting each arm and link, 'the entire mechanism is again in proper alinement. The stud 151 extends through a sleeve 154. A spring 155 is arranged withinthe sleeve to normally force the stud upwardly. The lower end ofthe stud is provided with a handle 156 bv means of which it may be moved downwardly against the tension of the spring 155 to release the link 149.

The connecting links 134 of the second op eration rolls 121 are provided Awith springs 157, as shown-1in Figure 7 of the drawings. These springs areamounted on bolts 158 and retained in position by nuts 159. In completing the second operation, it isv necessary to exert considerable pressure on the can and cover to insure atight joint, but diie tov the variations in commercial tin and also tothe additional,thickness?onY theA side seam of thel can body, it `is almost impossible to make ,a erfectseam Without some cushioning means.

tops 160 are placed between the seeming rolls and these stops serve to prevent curling oV f of the can over the chuck if, for any reason,

a can is delivered to the seeming station with, out a cover. The apparatus is provided with a housing 161 and this housing and the seaming mechanism are supported on a stationary column 162. This housing ma Ibe adjusted by means of a screw 163 to any esired height. A pinion 164 is slidably mounted on the main shaft 165 and this pinion transmits power to an intermediate gear 166 freely mounted on a sleeve 167. The gears 164 and 166 are connected/through a train of gears 168, 169 and 170, as shown. The gear-166 meshes with an internal gear 171 to operate the seaming heads, as previousl described. A pinion 17 2 is arranged on t e lower end of the main shaft 165 and this pinion drives the lower v mechanism of the machine through a gear 173, gear 174, and gear 175, which is loosely mounted on the column, and drives gear 176.

The gear 176 is mounted on an intermediate shaft 177, which carries the bevel gear 101, and this shaft operates the gear 27 through a pinion 178. The turret is carried by a sleeve 179, and the turret and' gear 29, which are slidably connected to the gear 27, revolve on the stat1onary column 162. It will be noted that gears 27 and 25 are identical to gears 29 and 28 and both'trains revolve as a single unit, operating the 4seaming station on the axis' of the shaft 26. The lifter cam 20 is carried by the gear 175 and revolves at the same speed as the seeming station.

The intermediate shaft 177 is provided wlth a worm 180 which drives the horizontal shaft 181 through a worm gear 182. The in through gears V19() and 191. A clutch con-` trol lever 192 is adapted' to connect a Worm wheel 193y to lthe gear 169. This permits manual operation of the machine by means of a worm 194, meshing-with the worm wheel 193 andmounted on a shaft 195. The shaft 195 may be provided with a suitable hand wheel (not shown) to permit manual operation of the machine through the worm.

The pulley clutch is of a friction disk type, as shown in Figure 1 of the drawings. A spring 196 engages the pulley 56 and connects 1tto a drlving plate 197, throu hiloating disks 198. This provides a sa. e clutch action with gradual pick-up, and even if the Y idly, the floating friction isks will engage 6 v yLeeaoee the driving plate gradually eliminating grabbing action and. damage to the machine.

In Figure 3 ofthe drawings, I have shown a modified form of the invention in which the cans designated by the reference numeral 199 are carried in pockets on an endless conveyor (not shown) and the seaming stations 200 are arranged beside the conveyor functioning in the same manner as the tangentially arranged seaming stations shown in Figure 2 of the drawings.

In operation, the cans are delivered to the turret 4 by the feeding diskl and the sel lecting mechanism. As previously described, the cans may be fed to the feeding disk without spacing them and the selectin mechanism delivers the cans in proper or er to the pockets 8 of the turret. The seaming stations 1, 2, and 3 receive the cans from the turret in the pockets 5, 6, and 7. The seam ing stations make a complete revolution to each quarter revolution of the turret and -when the turret is provided with twelve pockets, as shown, each seaming stat-ion receives the cans from every third pocket of the turret. I one of the seaming stations is out of order, the magnets of the selecting mechanism corresponding thereto may be disconnected and the machine operated with the seaming station out of service. This is important as it -permits any seaming sta-.

tion to be repaired without interfering with the opera-tion ofA the rest of the machine.

Eachseaming station continuously revolves on its own axls, being driven by the gears `27 and 29 through the pinions 25 and 28.

The cam 2O raises the lower half of the seaming station, after the cover has been placedv in position and the seaming operation is performed by the rolls 119 and 121.' Particular attention is called to the adjusting means which permits the rolls to be adjusted radially of thev seaming station for use with cans of diierent diameters.

It is to be understood that the form of my invention herewith shown and described is to be taken as a preferred example of the same, and that various changes in the shape, size, and arrangement of parts may be resorted to without departing from the's irit of the invention or the scope ofthe subjoined claims.

I claim:

1. A can searring machine comprising a turret, can receiving pockets arrangedon the periphery of said turret, and revolving seaming means arranged adjacent said turret,

Y each of said -seamm means being provided seaming pockets being adapted tofrevolve on its `own axis at a` predetermined rate of speed with respecttosaid turret to cooperate with t selected pockets ofrs'a-id turret.

to sai 2. A can seaming machine comprising a conveyor, can receiving pockets arranged on one side of said conveyor, and revolving seaming means arranged adjacent said conveyor, sai-d seaming means being provided with seaming pockets adapted to register with the pockets of said conveyor to receive cans therefrom, and each oftsaid seaming pockets being adapted to revolve on its own axis at a predetermined vrate of speed with respect to said turret to cooperate with selected pockets of said turret.

3. A can seeming. machine comprising a turret,' seaming means arranged adjacent said turret, a selecting disk to deliver cans to said turret, magnets carried by said disk to attract the cans and deliver them to said turret, and means for releasing said cans from said magnet.

4. A.can seaming machine comprising a turret, pockets arranged on the periphery of said turret, seeming means arranged tangentally of said turret, to receive cans from said pockets, feeding mechanism to deliver cans to said turret, and magnets carried by said feeding mechanism to lattract the cans and del liver them.

5. A can seeming machine comprising a turret, pockets arranged on the periphery of said turret, means for delivering cans to said pockets, means for feeding coversto said cans, and seaming means arranged adjacent said turret and adapted to receive cans and covers from said pocket, said seaming means including seaming pockets, each of said seaming pockets being adapted to revolve on its own axis at a predetermined rate of speed with respect to said turret to cooperate with selected pockets of said turret. l

6. A can seaming machine comprising a turret, can receiving pockets lformed on the periphe of said turret, and seaming means arrange adjacent said turret, said seaming means being provided with pockets` to receive the cansfrom said turret pockets, each seaming means bein adaptedtoreceive'cans from predetermine turret pockets whereby turret, can receiving pockets arranged on the p periphery of said turret, and revolving seammg means arranged tangentially of said turret, said seaming means being provided with 'seaming kets, each of said seaming pockets beingada tedto revolve about its own axis at a pre etermined rate of speed and to register with certain of the turre .pockets to receive cans therefrom. Y

8. A can seaming machine comprising a turret, seeming means arranged adjacent said turret a rotating feeding disk to deliver cans turret, a selecting disk arranged between said feeding disk and said turret, vanes carried by said selecting disk, and magnets associated With said vanes to attract cans on said selecting disk.

9. A can seaming machine comprising a turret, seaming means arranged adjacent said turret, a rotating feeding disk to deliver cans to said turret, a. selecting disk arranged between said feeding disk and said turret, vanes carried by said selecting disk, and magnets associated with said vanes to attract cans on said selec-ting disk, said selecting disk being eccentrically mounted to separate cans from said magnet as they approach the turret.

10. A can seaming machine comprising a conveyor, can receiving pockets arranged on said conveyor, electro-magnets arranged in said pockets, to retain cans and covers therein, and revolving seaming means arranged adjacent said conveyor, each of said seaming means being provided with a pocket adapted l to register with certain of the conveyor pockets to receive cans and covers therefrom.

11. A can seaming machine comprising a turret, can receiving pockets arranged on the periphery of said turret, seaming means arranged adjacent said turret and provided with pockets to receive cans, a rotating feeding disk to deliver cans to said turret, a selecting disk arranged bet`vveen said feeding disk and said turret, and magnets carried by said` selecting disk to attract cans from said feeding disk, whereby the delivery of cans to any seaming means may be discontinued by disconnecting the corresponding magnets. l

12. A can seaming machine comprising a turret,'can receiving pockets arranged on the periphery of said turret, means for feeding covers to cans in said pockets, seaming means arranged adjacent said turret, each of said seaming means being provided with a can receiving pocket, a pressing pad in each of said seaming means to assemble a can and cover, a chuck arranged in' said seaming means, means for raising a can and cover to engage said chuck, and seaming rollers to seam said cover to the upper edge of said can.

13. A can seaming machine comprising a turret, a seaming means, means for delivering cans from said turret to said seaming means, and cover feeding mechanism, said cover feeding mechanism comprising a magazine, separator knives arranged at the bottom of said magazine, a cover feeding turret. a lug carried by said turret to engage a separated cover, and a. pocket in said turret to receive said cover and convey it to assembling position.

14. A cover feeding mechanism for can seaming machines, comprising a magazine, oppositely arranged separating knives arranged at the bottom of said magazine, a rock shaft to which said knives are connected, a ratchet tooth formed on said shaft, a paWl 15. In a cover feeding mechanism for canV seaming machines, a magazine, a pair of oppositely arranged alternately operating separating knives arranged beneath said magazine, a yoke connecting said knives, a sleeve carried by said yoke, a shaft in Which said sleeve is mounted, and means for oscillating said shaft.

16. In a can seaming machine, a. cover marker comprising a pair of jaws, dies mounted in said jaws, and eccent-rics connected by means of straps to said jaws to reciprocate them.

17. In a can seaming machine, a seaming head, a sleeve arranged in Said head, eccentrics mounted on said sleeve, links connected to said eccentrics, and seaming rollers connected to said links.

18. In a can seaming machine, a seaming head, a sleeve arranged in said head, eccenaisv tries mounted on said sleeve, diametrically opposed seaming rolls carried by said head, and links connecting said rolls to said eccentrics.

19. In a can seaming machine, a seamingv head, a sleeve arranged 1n said head, eccentries mounted on said sleeves, a preliminary rseaming roller arranged in said head, a iincans to said turret, a selecting disk arranged between said feeding disk and said turret, vanes carriedby said selecting disk, and cams connected to said vanes to accelerate the can velocity as it is delivered to the turret.

22. In a can seaming means, a seaming roller, a spindle connected to said roller, an eccentric sleeve surrounding said spindle, an arm connected to said sleeve, and a pivoted link connected to said arm whereby said seaming rol-ler may be moved to an inoperative position by swinging said arm and said link on their pivots.

23. A can seaming machine comprising a conveyor simultaneously movable past a plurality of revolving seaming means each of said seaming means lcomprising a seaming mechanism, can receiving means and lifting seaming means tangentially to said conveyor in parallel orbits, means for delivering cans and covers to each seaming means from certain conveyor pockets, means for positioning cans and covers in said seaming means and subsequently acting means in said seaming means for performing a seaming operation during each revolution of said seaming means in their respective orbits.

24. A can seaming machine comprising a conveyor simultaneously movable past a plurality of revolving seaming means, means for continuously revolving said seaming means tangentially to said conveyor in parallel orbits, a rotary seaming head associated with each of said seaming means, a seaming chuck arranged coaxially with said seaming head, means for rotating said seaming head a prescribed number of revolutions during each revolution of said seaming means, means for imparting to said seaming head a coaxial rotary movement in operating relation around said seaming chuck and simultaneously carrying said seaming head in the respective orbit of its seaming means.

25. A can seaming machine comprising a conveyor simultaneously movable past a plurality of revolving seaming means in parallel orbits, means for moving said conveyor s1- multaneously past each seaming means at uniform velocity and equal to the peripheral speed of said seaming means, a plurality of relatively closely spaced can and cover carrying pockets arranged in said conveyor, means to register each group of adjacent pockets in said conveyor equal in number to the number of said seaming means 1n consecutive order with said seaming means and 'deliver cans and covers thereto in operating relation, and retaining means associated with said conveyor pockets for retaining cans and covers during the period when said cans and covers remain in said pockets.

26. A can seaming machine comprising a conveyor simultaneously movable past a plurality of revolving seaming means in parallel orbits, means for moving said conveyor s1- multaneously past each seaming means at uniform velocity and equal to the peripheral speed of said seaming means, a seaming mechanism associated with said seaming means and adapted to perform a complete seaming operation while a can remains relatively stationary therein, means for` rotating said seaming means in unison with said conveyor, a can and cover receiving pocket associated with each seaming means and adapted to register with a predetermined conveyor pocket during each revolution and embrace a can and cover for truing the same and assembling them, means for lifting said can and cover in said seaming means to the seaming position,

and mechanism for seaming said can.

27. A ca n seaming machine comprising a conveyor simultaneously movable past a plurality of revolving seaming means in parallel orbits, seaming means arranged adjacent said conveyor, a rotating feeding disc to deliver cans to said conveyor, a selecting disc arranged between said feeding disc and said conveyor, vanes carried by said selecting disc, magnets associated with said vanes and selecting disc to attract and position incoming cans carried by said feeding disc in unrestricted relation, can guides associatedwith said feeding disc and adapted to direct said cans toward selecting disc, means for returning unselected cans and merging same at incoming path on said feeding disc to repeat the cycle toward said selecting disc until positioned on said selecting disc for subsequent operation, and means for bodily carrying said cans from said feeding disc to said seaming means.

28. A can seaming machine comprising a turret simultaneously movable past a plu rality of revolving seaming means arranged tangentially of said turret and revolving in parallel orbits, a supporting column arranged adjacent said turret, a stationary housing slidably mounted on said supporting column and adapted to retain the upper mechanism of said seaming means, adjusting means associated with said housing and said upper mechanism for manual setting to seam cans of varying height, a sleeve carrying said turret journaled on said supporting column and provided with a gear at each end, said sleeve gears intermeshing with corresponding gears of the upper and lower mechanism of said seaming means and adapted to impart a simultaneous rotary movement to said upper and lower mechanism of each seaming means in unison with said turret, and means for imparting a continuous rotary movement to said turret sleeve and said seamingr means.

29. A cover feeding mechanism for can closing machines comprising a cover magazine, a cover feeding turret, an oscillating yoke, a pair of oppositely mounted cover scparating knives arranged at the bottom of said magazine and carried by said yoke, said oscillating yoke having means for alternately advancing each cover separating knife to said magazine for singly separating the bottom cover in the magazine duringreach forward and return movement, and means for oscillating said yoke in operating relation with said cover feeding turret and incoming cans.

30. In a can seaming machine, a rotary seaming head, freely revolving spindles arranged in said head, seaming rollers rigidly mounted on said freely revolving spindles, a pair of eccentric sleeves, said spindles being mounted in said sleeves, said sleeves being adapted for manual adjustment of said seaming rollers, and locking means associated with said sleeves to retain said sleeves and said rollers in fixed relation.

31. In a can seaming machine, a seaming head, a sleeve coaxially arranged in said head, eccentrlcs mounted on said sleeve, llnks connected to said eccentrics, vseammgrollers connected to said links, and a stationaryY seaming chuck, means for revolving said sleeve one revolution during a predetermined number of revolutions of the seaming head, said eccentrics having means for imparting a simultaneous movement toward and away from the chuck to each pairof diametrically opposed seaming rolls in operating relation.

32.` In a can seaming machine, a seaming head, a sleeve coaxially arranged in said head, eocentrios mounted on said sleeve, a plu- .eccentrics, a stationary seaming chuck, and

means for revolving said sleeve one revolution during a predetermined number of revolutions of the seaming head, said sleeve having means for imparting a simultaneous movem'ent toward and away from the chuck to each pair of diametrically opposed seaming rolls in operating relation.

In testimony whereof, I affix m signature.

FELIX HNTAR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2640452 *Mar 30, 1950Jun 2, 1953American Can CoCan closing machine with flange suspension support
US2769419 *Jan 6, 1949Nov 6, 1956Crown Cork & Seal CoClosure cap element feeding apparatus
US5782599 *Nov 2, 1995Jul 21, 1998Carnaudmetalbox PlcFor seaming a container end to an open end of a container body
US5839869 *Nov 2, 1995Nov 24, 1998Carnaudmetalbox PlcSeaming apparatus
US8636161Feb 12, 2009Jan 28, 2014Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Closure
US8733576Jan 11, 2013May 27, 2014Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Easily openable can lid having a movable portion for pull tab access
US8899091Oct 31, 2007Dec 2, 2014Crown Packaging Technology, Inc.Method for producing such a metal closure with separate disc and ring from a single closure blank
US20120021882 *Jul 25, 2011Jan 26, 2012Reiner Leroy JPin and double profile roll assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification413/35, 413/46, 413/37
International ClassificationB21D51/30, B21D51/32
Cooperative ClassificationB21D51/32
European ClassificationB21D51/32