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Publication numberUS1699760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 22, 1929
Filing dateMay 4, 1925
Priority dateMay 4, 1925
Publication numberUS 1699760 A, US 1699760A, US-A-1699760, US1699760 A, US1699760A
InventorsJohn C Sherman
Original AssigneeBrown Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for forming paper strips
US 1699760 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. c'. SHERMAN METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FORMING PAPER STRIPS Jan. 22, 1929.

Filed New 4. 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jan. 22, 1929. 1,699,760

J. C. SHERMAN METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FORMING PAPER STRIPS Filed May 4, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 llllllllllll I! Patented Jan 22, 1929.

WED sm'rssraenr OFFICE.

JOHN C. SHERMAN, OF GORHAM, MAINE, ASSIGNOR T BROWN COIi'IPANY, OF BERLIN, NEW HAMPSHIRE, A CORPORATION OF MAINE.

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FORMING PAPER STRIPS.

Application filed May 4, 1925. Serial no. 27,705.

This invention relates to a method and ap paratus for making from pulp on a paper machine narrow strips of thin partially compacted pulp such that these, upon being further compacted and dried Would become paper if utilized in a paper-making machine for such purpose; these strips being suitable for the manufacture of rovings or yarn, more especially by the method and apparatus for pr0- 19 ducing such roving or yarn disclosed in my Patent No. 1,542,915, granted June 23, 1925 for paper yarn and process of producing the same. The mechanism shown in this patent is capable of forming rovings at the high speed at Which a paper machine may be operated, and the present invention is designed to form the individual strips on paper-making machines While the paper is still Wet so that they can be fed directly to the roving mechanism Without requiring intermediate handling. For this purpose the pulp pick-up device, which may be a cylinder mold, is forn'ied on its surface with a plurality of series of spaced alined ridges acting to produce slits delining partial lines of severance of the sheet being formed. As the pulp Web is atthis time relatively Wet and Weak, the strips are not formed con'ipletely separated but are left attached at intervals between the alined slits to present a sheet form in order that the material may be more readily handled. 1ndividual strips at this stage of the mani'ifacture would be excessively delicate. The pulp Web is taken off the mold on a blanket inthe usual manner and after removal from the blanket the severing of individual strips is completed. In order to insure that the action of the severing mechanism shall be in line with the slits formed in the webfas made, mechanism for correctly relating the severin mechanism and the web should be provided. The strips as thus severed are still somewhat wet and are in proper condition to be fed directly to the roving forming meclmnisin which utilizes such Wet strips as its material to be operated upon.

For more complete understanding of this invention,- reference may be had to the accompanying drawings in Wl]iCl1- Figure 1 illustrates a portion of the strip formed by the mechanism of this invention.

Figures 2, 8 and a are detail portions of the edinder mold surface showing different W uctions.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary cross section of the mold constructed according to the showing of Figure 3. s

Figure 6 is a detail section on line 6-6 of Figure 5. a

Figure 7 is a perspective of a portion of the Web of partiallycompacted paper as removed from the cylinder mold.

Figure 8 is a diagrammatic vievv illustrating the formationof the Web on the paper machine and the completion of its severance into strips suitable for the roving making machine, v

Figure 9 is an elevation of mechanism for completing the severing of the Web.

Figure 10 is a vertical section through a portion of the same mechanism.

Figure ll is a section through an electric clutch;

Figure 12 is a fragmentary perspective showing a portion of the position controlling means for the severing mechanism.

Referring to Figures 2, 3, 4E and 7, various Ways of forming thecyhnder mold to produce the desired Webpartially severed into strips of alined ridges which project from the surface of the Wire so as to prevent the deposit of the pulp on these portions. I11 Figure 2 these ribs are shown as formed of sections of Wire I inserted through openings 2 in the Wire mesh surface and having their ends 3 projecting inwardly of this Wire mesh folded toward each other against the mesh so as to leave the portions 4; projecting above the surface of the mesh. These Wires are arranged in alined relation, but spaced apart so as to form series of alined slots spaced laterally from each other as illustrated in Figure 7. Preferably the slots are staggered, thus to increase the strength ofthe Web 10 as taken from the cylinder mold for further treatment.

Instead of forming the slot defining ribs in the manner illustrated in Figures 3, 5 and 6, they may he formed by continuous wires 11 having alternate portions 12 and 13 lying above and below the pulp-receiving surface of the Wire mesh 14. In Figure 4 another means for forming these slots is shovvn comprising bars 520 or metal ribbons or inter,

mittent strips of solder soldered or otherwise fixed to the outer face of the wire mesh 14. lVith any of these constructions the Web as taken oil from the Web forming mechanism is substantially as illustrated in Figure 7, having parallel series of spaced aligned slots 5 therein. The cylinder mold 26 picks up the pulp from the vat 25, as illustrated diagrana matically in Figure 8. The pulp is taken off on the blanket 27 at the couch roll 28, and passes along the blanket over the roll 29 and between the squeeze rolls 30. The Web oil pulp is then separated from the blanket the blanket returning about the rolls 31, 32 and 33 in any usual or suitable manner. The web is then sufl iciently strong to he handled by itself, but it still contains considerable water. It isthen in condition to be completely severed into strips of wet partially formed paper which are in condition to be delivered directly to the roving forming mechanism. This mechanism for completing the seve ing or the strips is illustrated particularly in Figures 9 to 12. Referringlirst to Figure 10, at 50 is shown a shaft on which is journaled a drum 51, a portion of this drum as at 52 being formed to prefect within an annular groove 53 in the shalt to prevent relative axial movement therebetween. This drum comprises end walls 54: and 55 joined by a tubular Wall 56. This wall 56 is provided with peripheral grooves57 spaced to correspon d to the spacing betweenthe series of slots 5 formed in the web of pulp and these grooves coinnumicate with the interior of the drum through perforations 58. The web of pulp, as at (it), is passed over this drum while the drum is being rotated at substantially the speed of the pulp, the pulp and drum being so relatively dis )osed that the slots 5 come opposite to the peripheral grooves 57 oi the drum. The surface of the drum thus acts as a slotted support. A series of jets of fluid under pressure, such as air or water, preterably water. positioned at (55 extending across the length of the drum, those jets being positioned in alincment with the peripheral grooves 57. its the web of pulp progresses over the drum these jets pass through the slots in the pulp, the grooves 57 and the perforations 58 into the interior of the drum, and when the solid portions between the ends of adjacent alined slots are encountered these jets act to cut througl'i the web forcing the n1a terial between theside edges of the grooves 57 from the reniainderof the web and projecting the material thus removed through the perforations 538 into the drum, together with thefluid from the jets By this means the severingof the web into strips along the partial lines of severance determined by the slots 5 is effected. As the material is thus torn 0r Washed awa from the remaining pon tions of the w the eges of the strips at these points are'left soniewhat more ragged rent- 91.

than the edges of the slotted portions which are produced by the rid es on the surface of the cylinder niold, as is illustrated in Figure .1. When these strips are being formed into rovings in the manner illustrated in the patent hcreinbei'ore referred to, these roughened edges are or some advantage in that they facilitate the engagement of the edge fibers with those within the edges of the strip and vided'a pair of shoes arranged to bear against the side edges ofthc web as it approaches the drum 51. Each of the shoes 80 is fixed to one end of a rod 81 slidably 1nounted in a suitable bearing 82 and pressed under alight spring tension against the edge of the pulp as by means of a light coil spring 83 surrounding the rod 81 and hearing at one end against a portion of the bearing 82 and at the other end against a collar 84: fixed to the rod 81. At the outer end of the rod. 8]. is mounted an electric terminal point 85 which is adapted to pass into a mercury globule 80 carried in a cup 87 when the shoe 8!) is moved laterally a *ay from the center line of the Web of pulp to a sullicient extent. Similar contact making and breaking mechanism is associated with each. of the shoes 80 and is operative to make contactbetwcen the corresponding point 85 and globule 86 on outward movement of the shoe. hen contact is made between the point 85 and the glohulc 86 an electric circuit is closed through a relay at 90 from a source ol low potential cur- This relay acts to close a contact 92 controlling a circuit leading from a source of relatively high potential, such as electric service lines 93 through a pair oi brushes 94 and conducting rings 95 on which these brushes bear, to a solenoid 96 in one portion 98 of an electrically actuated clutch. There are two of these clutch elements 98 positioned at opposite ends of a shaft 99 journaled in suitably fixed bearings 100. Between these boarings the shaft 99 is formed as or has fixed thereto a worm 101. This worm meshes with a worn'i gear 102 carried on a jack shaft 103. Also fixed to this jack shaft is a pinion 104 which engages in rack teeth 105 on the shaft 50. By rotation of the worm 101, therefore. it is evident that the shaft 50 may be reciprocated axially carrying the drum 51 therewith, the drum however, being free to rotate on the shaft 50. It is rotated in time with the travel of the pulp web thereover by any suitable means, but as herein shown the end plate 5 1 of the drum has a ring gear 110 thereon with which meshes a pinion 111 fixed to a driving shaft 112 which is driven in any suitable manner in time withthe paper machine to cause the drum to rotate with the desired peripheral velocity. The pinion 111 shorter axially than the ring gear 110 so that it may be maintained in proper meshing relation therewith throughoutthe entire range ofaxial motion of the drum 51 relative thereto.

The worm 101 is adapted tobe rotated in one or the other direction, this being acco1n plished as shown in the drawings by one or the other of a pair of continuously running meters 1 0. The armature shaft 121 of each of these motors has slidably keyed thereto a clutch disk element 122 of magnetizable material serving as an armature for the adjacent solenoid 96 and arranged in cooperative relation to one of the elements 98. As shown each of these elements 122 and 98 is provided with. a facing 123 of friction material. Each of the clutch elements 122 is normally held out of engagement with its mating element 98 by means of a spring 12a reacting between these elements, but whenever either one of the clutch solenoids 96 is energized, the mating clutch element 122 is drawn against the corresponding element 98 against the pressure exerted by the spring 124 and when this occurs the corresponding element 98 is caused to rotate with the element 122 in the direction of rotation of this element by its motor 120.

The closing; of the contact between the point 85 and the globule 86 at either side of the web of paper thus causesa corresponding clutch element 98 to become energized so as to couple this clutch element with one of the motors l2( thus to effect a rotation of the worm 101 in a direction to move the drum 51 in the same direction as the movement of the web of paper and the consequent movement of the shoe to bring the grooves in the drum into mating; relation with the slots in the web.

lu order to avoid arcing at the high] voltage contact at the relay 90; it may be desii'able to shunt a coiulenscr across the terminals of this contact as shown at 11.5. in order that movement of the drum axially to correct any iuisaliiiemeut between the slots in the paper and the drum grooves shall stopwhen such alinement is effected. the contact making mechanism including the shoes 80 and their mountings are shown as carried by the shaft 50 to move axially therewith. Thus as the drum is moved to make a correction of misalinement the mounting: of the shoe 80 which causes the correction to be effected moved away from the edge of the pulp so that its con tact point is moved out of contact with the globule 86, thus breaking the contact by the position. tien of the shoe is excessive so that the drum could not be moved to compensate therefor, the point passes through and beyond the irlobule 86, thus breaking the controlling contact for the correcting mechanism, but bringing this contact point into electrical connection with a supplemental contact as 130 which maybe caused to close a circuit through an alarm device at 131 to notify the operator of the abnormal condition, or if desired it might be employed to stop the machine automatically by any suitable stop mechanism. For convenience an alarm has been indicated in the drawing. The fluids passing from the jets to the interior of the drum and carrying pulp bridges therewith may be reinovedfrom the drum interior as by means of a suction pipe 135 extending through the shaft 50 and being downwardly turned within the drum and extending toward the lower surface thereof.

By this mechanism it is clear that the pulp is first formed as a web partially severed by slots into strips and that when the pulp has become sulliciently dry to possess suflicient strength for handling, it is completely severed into strips by cutting out the bridges of pulp between the ends of alined slots, and that the strips delivered from the drum are then still moist and suitable for making into rovings. i

It should be noted that this invention is not limited to the use of the described apparatus at the location indicated in the drawings. Thus, it is possible to cause the pulp to be separated into narrow strips afterth'e appli cation of one set of squeeze rolls after being removed from the. blanket and prior to the application thereto of a second set of squeeze rolls, and several such variations of the sequence of operations are obvious to any one familiar with the paper-1naking arts. It would also be within the scope of the present invention to permit the paper to dry before completing its severance into strips, though generally this would not be preferred.

Having thus described certain embodiments of this invention it should be evident to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications might be made therein without departiug from its spirit or scope as defined by the appended claims.

I claim 1. The method of forming strips of partially compacted paper suitable for making rovings which comprises forming from wet pulp a web of partially compacted paper havine; spaced alined slots therein, and completi the severing of said web into strips along the lines of said slots.

2. The method of forming; strips of partially compacted paper suitable for making rovings which comprises forming from wet vtime the drum has moved to its new corrected u If it should happen that the mopulp a web having spaced alined slots therein and while wet completing the severing of said Web into strips along; the lines of said slots.

3. The method of forming strips of partially compacted paper suitable for making rovings which comprises forming from wet pulp a web having spaced alined slots therein, and directing a fluid under pressure against said Web in alinement With and betw on said slots to thus complete the severing of the web into strips.

4. The method of forming strips of partially compacted paper suitable for making rovings which comprises forming from wet pulp a Web having spaced alined slots therein, and directing a fluid under pressure against said wet web in alinement with and between said slots to thus complete the severing of the web into strips.

5. The method of forming strips of partially coi'upacted paper suitable for making rovings, which comprises forming a web comprising partly separated strips, and subjecting said web to jets of fluid under pressure along the lines of partial separation to complete the severance of the Web into the desired strips.

6. The method of forming strips of partially compacted paper suitable for making rovings which comprises supportingone side of a wet web except along spaced lines, and directing a fluid jet against the face of said Webat said unsupported portions to sever the Web therealong.

7. The method of makinf strips of partially compacted paper suitable for making rovings, which comprises subjecting a web of partially compacted and partially severed wet pulp to jets of fluid. under pressure along the'lines of partial severance to complete the severance of said web into the desired strips.

7 8. The method of making: strips of p: tially compacted paper suitable for making rovings, which comprises depositing and forming wet pulp a web partially severed into strips. and then completing the severance of said web into strips. V

9. In combination, means for continuously depositing and forming a web of interfel'tcd material partially severed into strips, and

means for progressively completing the severance of sa d web into strips as it comes from said forming means.

10. In combination, means for forming a partially severed web from wet fibrous matcrial. and water jcts acting along the lines of partial severance to complete the severance of the Web into strips.

11, In combination, means for continuously forming a web of inter-felted fibrous material having a series of alined slots therein, and means for completing the severing-of said web into strips along; the lines of said slots.

12. A machine of the class described comprising means for continuously forming a prisiug a drum over the surface of which a web of sheet material may be passed, said drum having peripheral grooves arranged in parallel relation perpendicular to its axis, and means for forcing the material of said web opposite thereto into said grooves to sever said web into strips let. A machine of the class described comprisin a drum over the surface of which a web 0 sheet material may pass, and means acting autonnitically to maintain said drum in a predetermined relation laterally of said web. i

15. A machine of the class described comprising a rotatable and axially movable drum over which a web of sheet n'iaterial may be passed, and means guided by the lateral position of said web for moving said drum axi ally to tend to maintain said drum in a predetermined relation to said web.

16. A machine of the class described coinprising a rotary hollow drum over the surface of which sheet material may be passed, said drum having parallel peripheral grooves therein con'mmnicating through perforations with its interior, means for projecting fluid jets against said Web opposite to said grooves to project the material of said web through said grooves and perforations into said drum to thus sever said web into strips, lllltlll'lcttflh' for rcumvinp the material so projected from the interior of said drum.

17. A machine of the class describe-ail coup prising! a slotted support. means for passing a web oi paper across said support. and means for directing a fluid jet against the opposite tat-c of said web opposite to said slots to sever said web. i

18. A imichine or the class described comprising means for forming a web of partially compacted paper with series of spaced alined slots therein, a support grooved to cmrespoml with the slots of said web, means for passing said web across said support, said slots and grooves being in register, and means for dircctin a fluid jet toward the grooves of said support tor breaking through the spaces in said web in alincmcnt with the slots therein to complete the sevcrance of said web into strips,

19. A machine of the class described comprising; means for iorn'iin r a web of partially compzmtml paper with series of spaced alined slots tint-re n, a support grooved to correspond with the slots of said. web, means for passing said web across said support, said slots and grooves being, in register, means for directing a fluid jet toward the grooves of said support for breaking through the spaces in said Web in alineinent With the slots thcreinto complete the severance of said Web into strips, and means for maintaining said Web and said support with their slots and grooves in registration.

20. A machine of the class described comprising a rotatable and axially movable drum over Which a Web of sheet material maybe passed, said drum having spaced peripheral grooves therein, means for projecting fluid jets against the outer face of said Web opposite to said grooves to sever the Web into strips, and means for automatically adjusting the axial position of said drum in accordance with the lateral position of said web.

21. A machine of the class described comprising a drum over which a Web of sheet material may pass, an axially movable shaft on which said drum is journaled, means for rotating said drum, means acting on lateral movement of said Web Within predetermined limits to cause corresponding axial movement of said drum to tend to maintain a predetermined relation betvveen said drum and Web, and means acting on the movement of said Web beyond said predetermined limits to eifect an indication thereof.

In testimony whereof I have affixed my signature.

JOHN G. SHERMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2771363 *Mar 3, 1949Nov 20, 1956Paterson Parchment Paper CompaPaper web with a simulated woven texture
US2923352 *Jan 31, 1955Feb 2, 1960Diamond National CorpApparatus for molding pulp articles having apertures formed thereon
US3136649 *Feb 23, 1961Jun 9, 1964Kimberly Clark CoManufacture of cellulosic products
US3142428 *Sep 8, 1961Jul 28, 1964Time IncVacuum roll
US3891157 *Jun 4, 1973Jun 24, 1975Beloit CorpSlitting mechanism for winder
US4152958 *Mar 14, 1977May 8, 1979Clayton BogertFluid jet cutting of rolls of material
US4213359 *Feb 27, 1978Jul 22, 1980Lever Manufacturing Co.Fluid jet cutter with confined passageway for fluid disposal
US5245025 *Jun 28, 1991Sep 14, 1993The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod and apparatus for making cellulosic fibrous structures by selectively obturated drainage and cellulosic fibrous structures produced thereby
US5277761 *Jun 28, 1991Jan 11, 1994The Procter & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having at least three regions distinguished by intensive properties
US5503715 *May 24, 1993Apr 2, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod and apparatus for making cellulosic fibrous structures by selectively obturated drainage and cellulosic fibrous structures produced thereby
US5527428 *Jun 26, 1995Jun 18, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyProcess of making cellulosic fibrous structures having discrete regions with radially oriented fibers therein
US5534326 *Dec 6, 1993Jul 9, 1996The Procter & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having discrete regions with radially oriented fibers therein, apparatus therefor and process of making
US5614061 *Mar 1, 1996Mar 25, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyApparatus for forming a cellulosic fibrous structures having at least three regions distinguished by intensive properties
US5654076 *Feb 15, 1996Aug 5, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having discrete regions with radially oriented fibers therein
US5804036 *Feb 21, 1997Sep 8, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper structures having at least three regions including decorative indicia comprising low basis weight regions
US5804281 *Sep 23, 1996Sep 8, 1998The Proctor & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having at least three regions distinguished by intensive properties
US5820730 *Feb 21, 1997Oct 13, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyPaper structures having at least three regions including decorative indicia comprising low basis weight regions
US5843279 *Aug 25, 1997Dec 1, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyCellulosic fibrous structures having at least three regions distinguished by intensive properties
US6136146 *Aug 22, 1997Oct 24, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyNon-through air dried paper web having different basis weights and densities
US6464831Mar 17, 2000Oct 15, 2002The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod for making paper structures having a decorative pattern
US6503370 *Apr 2, 2001Jan 7, 2003Sca Hygiene Products AbMethod of producing a paper having a three-dimensional pattern
Classifications
U.S. Classification162/195, 162/260, 226/53, 162/263, 162/286, 226/95, 83/169, 162/198, 83/53
International ClassificationD21F11/16
Cooperative ClassificationD21F11/16
European ClassificationD21F11/16