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Publication numberUS1700136 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 29, 1929
Filing dateJan 19, 1928
Priority dateJan 19, 1928
Publication numberUS 1700136 A, US 1700136A, US-A-1700136, US1700136 A, US1700136A
InventorsLeidgen Nicholas C
Original AssigneeLeidgen Nicholas C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mop
US 1700136 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N. C. LEI DG EN Jan. 29, 1929.

MOP

Filed Jan. 19, 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet l I N VEN TOR. fl/mam 56/00 615A A TTORNE Y.

Patented Jan. 29, 1929.

UNITED STATES NICHOLAS C. LEIDGEN, 0F DETROIT, MICHIGAN.

MOP.

Application filed January 19, 1928.

This invention relates to mops and the object of the invention is to provide a mop which may be wrung out without getting the hands into the water or handling the cloth part of the mop.

7 Another object of the invention is to provide a mop which may be used in the usual manner but which may be wrung out by longitudinal movement of one portion of the handle in relation to another portion thereof.

Another object of the invention is to provide a mop of the character described in which the mop itself maybe drawn up out of the water in the mop pail and by pushing downwardly on one portion of the handle and holding another portion thereof from turning, the mop may be wrung out into the pail so that no water is spilled on the floor.

These objects and the several novel features of the invention are hereinafter more fully described and claimed and the preferred form of construction by which these objects are attained is shown in the accompanying drawings in which Fig. 1 is a section through a mop and handle embodying my invention and in position for mopping.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged section taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1. 1

Fig.3 is an enlarged section taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged section taken on line 44 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged section taken on line 55 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 6 is a section through the lower end of the mop.

Fig. 7 is an enlargedsection showing how the upper end of the mop is fastened.

Fig. 8 is an elevation showing the mop in position for wringing.

Fig. 9 is a similar view showing the mop during the wringing operation.

' Fig. 10 is a view showing the mop at the completion of the wringing operation.

Fig. 11 is a detail showing the notches at the upper end of the handle slot.

The mop, as shown in Fig. 1, comprises a handle member 1 provided with a longitudinal. slot 2 in its lower end, as shown in Figs. 1, 6 and 8. The lower end of this member 1 is provided with a sliding caster 3 and a pin 4 extends through the slot 2 and is secured to a ring 5 as shown in Fig. 6. The mop, as shown in Fig. 8, is made up of a series of strands 6 which are sewn together Serial No. 247,850.

at 7 and 8 and these strands at the lower end are clamped to the sleeve 5 by the wire clamps 9. At the upper end the strands are secured dle due to its looseness and provides a good sized mopping head. At the upper end the handle member 1 is provided with a socket 12 secured to the end thereof having a square shaft13 extending therefrom. This shaft 13 is straight for a portion of its length and then is twisted spirally for the remainder of its length. A movable handle member 14 is provided having a plate 15 at the lower end secured thereto as shown in Fig. 3 and this plate is provided with a square aperture fitting the shaft 13. The handle member 14 is provided with a recess 16 for the shaft 13 and is provided with a ball end 17 shown in Figs. 1, 8 and 9.

The device is used for mopping as shown in Fig. 1. When the operator desires to wring out the mop he grasps the sleeve 11 and lifts it. The handle 1 drops by gravity through the sleeve 11 until the mop is in the position shown in Fig. 8. Due to the slot in the lower end of the handle portion 1 the lower end of the handle will drop below the mop as shown in Fig. 8 and as this drops to the lower position the upper end of the sleeve 11 engages the plate 15 on the bottom of the handle porthis position the operator still holds the sleeve 11 in one hand and grasps the handle portion 14 in the other hand and presses downwardly. As the handle portion 14 and plate 15 moves downwardly the shaft 13 is rotated and rotates the handle 1 within the sleeve 11 thus turning the bottom of the mop in relation to the top of the mop which is held stationary in the hand of the operator. The lower end of the mop is provided with a rounded metal tip 3 so that it may rotate freely on the bottom of the pail or any other surface. This downward movement of the handle 14 and sleeve 11 twists the mop as shown in Fig. 9 and wrings the water out of the mop into the bucket or pail. After it has been twisted as shown in Fig. 9 further downward movement of the handle 14 moves the plate 15 down the straight portion of the shaft 13 thus compressing the mop endwise after it has been twisted and wringing further water out of the mop. By this arrangement the lower end of the mop handle 1 extends into the pail and holds the mop up out of the water while it is being wrung out and the water is wrung into the pail without splattering out over the floor. Themop is made of sufficient length so that it is not necessary to stoop'over towring the mop. After the mop has been wrung out the sleeve 11 is again lifted by the hand bringing the parts back to theposition shown inFig. 8 at which time the sleeve-may be dropped allowing the mop to fall to the lower end of the handle 1 back to the position shown in Fig. 1. At this time the handle 14 will by its own weight travel down the shaft 13 until it engages the member 12 by which the shaft is secured to the handle 1 at which time the mop is again ready for use in mopping.

From the foregoing description it becomes evident that the device is very simple and efficient in operation, will not easily get out of order, is composed of few parts and provides a device which accomplishes the 0biects described.

Having thus fully described my invention,

its. utility and mode of operation, what I claim. and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is 1. In a mop, a handle having a longitudinal slot in the lower end, the slot opening into notches at its upper end, a pin extending through the slot, a mop head, the pin. being carried by the lower end of the mopghead and being adapted to be raised and turned into the said notches when the mop head is wrung, a sleeve slidable longitudinally of the handle and in which the handle is rotatable, the up per endof the mop head being secured to the sleeve and the sleeve and mop head being movable longitudinally of the handle, a square shaft extending from the upper end of thehandle and being twisted spirally at its upper end, a handle member havinga recess for the said shaft, and a. member carried by the handle member having an aperture fitting the said shaft whereby when the handle member is moved downwardly the handle is rotated and twists the mop head and as the handle member is moved onto the straight part of the shaft the mop head is compressed endwise.

2. Ina mop, a handle having a longitudinal slot in the lower end, a ring about the handle having a 7 pin therein extending through the slot in the handle, a mop head secured to the said ring at the lower end, a

sleeve slidable longitudinally of the handle and in which the handle is rotatable, the upper end of the mop head being secured to the said sleeve, a square shaft extending from the upper end of the handle and having a spirally twisted portion and a handle member of greater size than the handle having a plate at its lower end provided with an aperture fitting the said spirallytwistedshaft, the said handle member being provided with a recess for the shaft and the sleeve being adapted to be moved into contact with the plate on the handle member.

3. In a mop, a handle having, a longitudi- I nal slot in the lower end, a pin extending through the slot, a ring extending about the handle and secured to the pin, a mop head securedat the lower end to the said ring, a sleeve slidable longitudinally of the handle and in which the handle is rotatable, thev upper end of the mop head being secured to the sleeve and the sleeve and mop head being movable longitudinally of the handle, a square shaft extending from the upper end of-thehandle and beingtwisted spirally at its upper end, a handle member having. a recess for the said shaft, and a plate. secured over the recess and havingv an aperture fitting the square shaft. y

4:. In a mop, a handle, a mop head secured at the lower end for movement longitudinally of the handle and rotatable with the handle, a sleeve slidable longitudinally of the handle to whichthe upper end of the mop head is secured and in which the handle is rotatable, a spirally twisted: shaft extending from the upper end of the handle, a handle member havinga recess for the shaft, and a plate secured to the said handle member having an aperture fitting the spirally twisted shaft.

5. In a mop, a handle having ailongitudinal slotin the lower end,.amop head, a member to which the mop head is attached riding in theslot of thehandle, a sleeve freely movable on the handle to which the upper end of the mop head is secured, a spirally twisted shaft extending from the upper end of the handle and a handle member movable longitudinally of the shaft and having a plate provfidid with. anaperture fitting the twisted s a t.

6. In a mop, a handle adapted to be rotated,

a mop head movable longitudinally of the.

handle and secured at one end to rotate therewith, a sleeve in which the handle is rotatable and to which the opposite end of the. mop head is secured, the sleeve being movable longitudinally of the handle, a

square shaft extending from the handle and having a spirally twisted portion, and a handle member adapted to be moved down the square shaft to rotate the handle in the sleeve.

7. In a mop, a handle adapted for rotation,

a mopelement movable longitudinally of the handle and secured at one end thereof to roward the mop end causes rotation thereof, and means for causing compression of the mop subsequent to its being twisted. 10

In testimony whereof I sign this specification.

NICHOLAS G. LEIDGEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3336620 *Jul 14, 1964Aug 22, 1967Moss Theron VMop and method of making the same
US5566417 *Jan 30, 1995Oct 22, 1996Hsieh; StephenTwistable wring mop with dual locking members
US5577290 *Dec 13, 1995Nov 26, 1996Monahan; Patrick H.Wet mop with self-contained wringer
US5875509 *Oct 31, 1995Mar 2, 1999Facca; Andrew G.Self-wringing mop
US5996161 *Aug 18, 1998Dec 7, 1999Facca; Andrew G.Self-wringing mop
US6212728Dec 2, 1998Apr 10, 2001Multi-Reach, Inc.Self-wringing ratchet mop
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/120.2
International ClassificationA47L13/142, A47L13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/142
European ClassificationA47L13/142