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Publication numberUS1701260 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1929
Filing dateAug 23, 1927
Priority dateAug 23, 1927
Publication numberUS 1701260 A, US 1701260A, US-A-1701260, US1701260 A, US1701260A
InventorsWilliam Fischer
Original AssigneeWilliam Fischer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient sole pad for shoes
US 1701260 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Pfb. 5, 1929. 1,701,260

W. FISCHER RESILIENT SOLE PAD FOR SHOES Filed Aug. 23, 1927 INVENTOR FISC er Patented Feb. 5, 1929.

PATENT OFFICE.

WILLIAM FISCHER, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

RESILIENT SOLE PAD FOR SHOES.

Application filed August 23, 1927. Serial No. 214,851.

The present invention relates to improvements in foot-wear,particularly in the solepads of shoes, and it is the principal object of the invention to provide a removable pneumatic pad which can be inflated to any desired suitable degree for resiliently supporting the foot.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a sole-pad for toot-wear of simple and inexpensive construction, yet efliciently cushioning the foot to avoid falling arches, etc." I

A further object of the invention is the provision of a pneumatic sole-pad having a self-closing valve to avoid the escape of air after inflation, and equipped with a suitable valve, the parts being so constructed as to avoid injury to the foot or undue pressure against the same.

These and further objects and advantages of the invention will become more fully known. as the description thereof proceeds, and will then be specifically pointed out in the appended claim.

In the accompanying drawing, forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is a. fragmentary longitudinal section of a shoe equipped with a pneumatic sole-pad constructed according to the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a bottom plan view thereof, partly .in section.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view of part of the pad, illustrating the valve arrangement and the packing.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary plan View thereof.

A shoe 10 has removably placed upon its inner solo a pad 11, having. substantially the shape of the sole, and adapted to be inflated by means of a removable inflation tube 12, the hollow stem 13, of which removably engages a suitable socket 14, in the pad. Intermediate its ends the tube 12 is equipped with the customary ball-valve 15 within a suitable r casing 16, and pressed against its seat by a spring 17.

A. suitable flap 18 within pad 11 is adapted to close the opening of the socket 14 after removal of the inflation tube, by the inner pressure prevailing in the tube after its inflation.

A valve 19 is arranged above flap 18 and has a socket 20 formed therewith into which the edged end of an operating handle 21 fits, to be frictionally held therein, and allowing a ready withdrawal of the same upon completion of the inflating process The device operates as follows:

The pad 11 is inserted into the shoe, so that it can be inflated by means of the inflation tube 1.2, having an outer flaring mouth 22. The escape of the air through the tube 12, is prevented by the ball-valve 15. Then the valve 19 is swung, by means of its handle 21, to cover the openings in the pad in sockets 1st and 20, and handle 21 and tube 12 are then removed. It will be clear that the pressure prevailing within the pad will press flap 18 against said valve and constitute an air tight closure, so that: no air can escape from the pad.

lVhile I have described and shown one example ot the practical embodiment of my invention, it will be clear that the same may be subjected to many changes. such as'fall within the scope of the appended claim without departure from the spirit of the invention and the principle involved.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is:

A pneumatic sole-pad for shoes adapted to be placed upon the sole of the shoe, and compri ing a socket adapted to receive the 1101- low stem of a removable valve-controlled inflation tube, a valve in said pad adapted to be frictionally engaged by the edged lower end of a removable operating handle to be operated thereby to close said socket, and a flap adapted to be pressed by the air pressure prevailing in the pad against said valve and socket to provide an air tight closure after removal of tube and handle from said socket and valve.

In testimony whereof I have afiixed my signature.

WILLIAM FISCHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4187620 *Jun 15, 1978Feb 12, 1980Selner Allen JBiomechanical shoe
US6308439Dec 13, 2000Oct 30, 2001Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6314662Mar 9, 2000Nov 13, 2001Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US6360453May 30, 1995Mar 26, 2002Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plan
US6487795 *Jun 7, 1995Dec 3, 2002Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6591519Jul 19, 2001Jul 15, 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6662470Oct 12, 2001Dec 16, 2003Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
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US6675498Jun 7, 1995Jan 13, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6675499Oct 12, 2001Jan 13, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6708424Aug 28, 2000Mar 23, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe with naturally contoured sole
US6729046Oct 12, 2001May 4, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US6748674Nov 6, 2002Jun 15, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US6782640Sep 12, 2001Aug 31, 2004Craig D. WestinCustom conformable device
US6789331Jun 5, 1995Sep 14, 2004Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
US6848200Jun 16, 2003Feb 1, 2005Craig D. WestinCustom conformable device
US6877254Nov 13, 2002Apr 12, 2005Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US6918197Sep 26, 2002Jul 19, 2005Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US7082697Jun 7, 2004Aug 1, 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US7093379Nov 8, 2002Aug 22, 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole with rounded inner and outer side surfaces
US7127834Apr 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
US7168185Oct 22, 2003Jan 30, 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoes sole structures
US7174658May 16, 2005Feb 13, 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US7287341Aug 19, 2004Oct 30, 2007Anatomic Research, Inc.Corrective shoe sole structures using a contour greater than the theoretically ideal stability plane
US7334356Jul 12, 2005Feb 26, 2008Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US7546699Apr 23, 2007Jun 16, 2009Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US7647710Jul 31, 2007Jan 19, 2010Anatomic Research, Inc.Shoe sole structures
US8141276Nov 21, 2005Mar 27, 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with an internal flexibility slit, including for footwear
US8205356Nov 21, 2005Jun 26, 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8256147May 25, 2007Sep 4, 2012Frampton E. EliisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8291618May 18, 2007Oct 23, 2012Frampton E. EllisDevices with internal flexibility sipes, including siped chambers for footwear
US8494324May 16, 2012Jul 23, 2013Frampton E. EllisWire cable for electronic devices, including a core surrounded by two layers configured to slide relative to each other
US8561323Jan 24, 2012Oct 22, 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear devices with an outer bladder and a foamed plastic internal structure separated by an internal flexibility sipe
US8567095Apr 27, 2012Oct 29, 2013Frampton E. EllisFootwear or orthotic inserts with inner and outer bladders separated by an internal sipe including a media
US8670246Feb 24, 2012Mar 11, 2014Frampton E. EllisComputers including an undiced semiconductor wafer with Faraday Cages and internal flexibility sipes
US8732230Sep 22, 2011May 20, 2014Frampton Erroll Ellis, IiiComputers and microchips with a side protected by an internal hardware firewall and an unprotected side connected to a network
US8732868Feb 12, 2013May 27, 2014Frampton E. EllisHelmet and/or a helmet liner with at least one internal flexibility sipe with an attachment to control and absorb the impact of torsional or shear forces
US8873914Feb 15, 2013Oct 28, 2014Frampton E. EllisFootwear sole sections including bladders with internal flexibility sipes therebetween and an attachment between sipe surfaces
US8925117Feb 20, 2013Jan 6, 2015Frampton E. EllisClothing and apparel with internal flexibility sipes and at least one attachment between surfaces defining a sipe
US8959804Apr 3, 2014Feb 24, 2015Frampton E. EllisFootwear sole sections including bladders with internal flexibility sipes therebetween and an attachment between sipe surfaces
US20040134096 *Oct 22, 2003Jul 15, 2004Ellis Frampton E.Shoes sole structures
US20040250447 *Jun 7, 2004Dec 16, 2004Ellis Frampton E.Shoe sole structures using a theoretically ideal stability plane
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/29, 36/153
International ClassificationA43B17/03, A43B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B17/03
European ClassificationA43B17/03