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Publication numberUS1701760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1929
Filing dateJun 20, 1924
Priority dateJun 20, 1924
Publication numberUS 1701760 A, US 1701760A, US-A-1701760, US1701760 A, US1701760A
InventorsPaul J Paffen
Original AssigneeBarrett Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for collecting shingles
US 1701760 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 12, 1929. 1,701,760

P. J. PAFFEN MACHINE FOR COLLECTING S HINGLES Filed June 20. 1924 4 Sheets-Sheet l Feb; 12, 1929. 1,701,760

P. J. PAFFEN MACHINE FOR COLLECTING SHINGLES Filed J 1924 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 m D u;

fab/Pg? 3mm Feb, 12, 1929.,

1,701,760 P. J. PAFFEN MACHINE FOR COLLECTING SHINGLES 7 Filed June 20. 1924 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 {Q l v R woewtoz Feb 12, 1929. 1,701,760

P. J. PAFFEN MACHINE FOR COLLECTING SHINGLES Filed June 20. 1924 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Patented Feb. 12, 1922.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

PAUL J. PAFFEN, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOR TO THE BARRETT COMPANY, A

, CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

-MACI-IINE FOR COLLECTING SHINGLES.

Application filed June 20,

' This invention relates to a device for collecting shingles in bundles or packages, so as to contain a predetermined number of the shingles. It relates more especially to a device of this character, by which shingles that are cut from a sheet of roofing material, can be collected in the desired manner. By this invention either individual shingles can be collected in bundles or packages of proper size, or strip shingles can be collected in a similar manner, as they are cut from a sheet of roofing material. Furthermore, the device is adapted to count the shingles in a package, and to shift automatically, when the desired number of shingles has been collected, so as to begin a new bundle. By this device, bottom boards for a package of shingles are automatically placed in position and the shingles are also automatically aligned so that their edges are even when the package is completed, and the packages are automatically moved aside at the proper time.

Arms or supports that are carried by traveling members are brought into position seriatim as they travel downwardly, boards for the bottom of the pile or stack of shingles are placed upon the arms, the shingles are fed thereto, one on top of the other and their edges brought flush with each other, the shingles are counted and another pile or stack begun on other arms or supports, and

' the individual paclmges or bundles containing a prcdetermincd number of shingles are automatically removed transversely from the arms or supports.

The invention will be understood from the description in connection with the accompanying drawings, 'in which,

Fig. 1 is a side view of the device in elevation partly broken away.

Fig. 2 is a plan view with parts removed.

Fig. 3 is an end elevation with parts removed.

4 is aside view of one of the details.

Fig. 5 is an end View of the same.

Fig. 6 is aplan view of the same, viewed from the bottom.

In the drawings reference character 1 indicates the frame of the device, which is pro- Vldfidntltll cross pieces 2. Shafts 3 and 4 are mounted in the frame 1 in the bearings 5 and 6. There are sprockets? on shaft 3 and corresponding sprockets 8 rigidly connected on shaft 4 and chains 9 pass over the respecthe individual shin 1924. Serial N0. 721,373.

ti ve sprockets 7 and 8. The chains 9 are provided at intervals with links 10 and 11, which have outward extensions or. projections thereon. Shafts 12 are pivoted in the proections on the links 10 and extend practi cally from one end of the machine to the other. These shafts 12 are provided at each end with cams 13 keyed thereon, which cams are provided with projections 14 extending inwardly longitudinally of the shaft 12. These extensions 14 on the cams are adapted to contact with the stationary cam members or angle irons 15 provided with curved extremities as shown at 16. Approximately the lower two thirds of those portions of the angle irons 15 which are parallel to shaft 4: are cut away, as shown at 15; for a purpose hereinafter to be described. The cams 15 are kept in place by means of brackets 17 and 18 which-are provided with notches 19 so as to fit over and rest upon the shafts 3 and a respectively. Other brackets 20 (Fig. 2) similar to the brackets 17 and 18 support pairs of vertical guides 21 made of angle iron, which guides are for the shafts 12 as they descend. The shafts 12 are provided with revolublc disks 22 to minimize the friction. Other guides 23 made of angle iron are disposed on the other side of the shaft 12 so that the guides 21 and 23 provide in effect channels thru which the disks 22 on the shafts 12 descend. Similar guides 24 made of angle iron are provided to supportguide plates 25 (one of which is shown in Fig. 1), these guide plates 25 serving to keep g es separated from each other when the rooting sheet is cut into a plurality of individual shingles.

The shafts 12 carry rigidly attached thereto, arms 26, sufficient in number to support the desired number of packages of shingles. Reccsses 27 in the arms 26 seat themselves against the shaft or rod 28 carried by the links 11, when these arms tilt forward at a certain position in their travel as will be explained below.

A, shaft 30carried in bearings 31 (Fig. 3) on frame 1, is provided with a friction wheel 32 and a ratchet-wheel 33 keyed thereon. A crank 34 is pivoted to the shaft 30 and carries a pawl 35 for the ratchet-wheel 33. A connecting rod 36, connects the crank 34; to the crank pin 37 which is attached off center to the face of the sprocket 38. A chain '39 from the main drive (not shown) passes over the sprocket 38 and drives the same.

A handle 40 is connected to the shaft 30, so that by lifting the pawl 35 the shaft 30 can be reset whenever desired. A pinion 41 on the shaft 30 meshes with the gear 42 on the shaft 4 and serves to drive this shaft, when the shaft '30 is driven.

A sprocket 43 on the shaft 30 (Figs. 1 and 2) carries the sprocket chain 44 which passes over the sprocket 45 on shaft 46 (Figs. 4, 5 and 6). A series of sprockets 47 on the shaft 46 drive sprocket chains 48 which pass over sprockets 49 on the shaft 50. These sprocket chains 49 each have attachments 51 thereon at intervals (Fig. 5) for the purpose of attaching cross-bars 52, which cross-bars have lugs or projections 53, which extend through slots 54 in the bottom plate 55 ofthe shingle board magazine 56.

The shaft 60 (Figs. 1, 2 and 3) to which the sprocket 38 is attached is mounted in bearing 61 and carries a sprocket 62 which drives a sprocket chain 63 that passes over the sprocket'64 on the pull-roll 65 (Figs. 4, 5 and 6).

A spur gear 66 on the shaft of pull-roll 65 meshes with spur gear 67 on pull-roll 68 whereby pull rolls 65 and 68 revolve in opposite directions. Bearings 69 and 70 are mounted near one corner of the magazine 56, in which bearings the pull-rolls 65 and 68 are mounted, the bearings for one of these rolls being preferably made adjustable, so that the rolls can be fixed at proper distances apart.

The shaft 60 is provided with a number of sprockets 73 (Fig. 2) over which pass sprocket chains 74. These sprocket chains 74 pass 'overidle sprockets not shown, and these chains serve to convey shingles from the cutter which severs the shingles or shingle strips from the sheet of roofinginaterial, and these chains 74 carry these shingles or shingle strips to the arms or supports 26 when it is desired to collect-the shingles.

A shaft 76(Figs. 1 and 3), is pivoted in bearings 77, and is provided with a crank arm 78 which carries a crank pin 79. K Thiscrank pin is placed in a long slot 80 in the connecting rod 81, which is pivoted at its other end by means of the pin 82 to the crank 83 which is connected to the shaft 60. A second crankarm 84 (Figs. 1 and 3) is keyed on the shaft 76 and its outer end is connected by means of a sprocket chain 95 passes to the sprocket 96 on shaft 97. The shaft 97 serves as a conveyor roll and is provided with a sprocket 98 over which a s rocket chain 99 passes and drives a serieso sprockets 100 mounted on parallel conveyor rolls 101, similar to the conveyor roll 97. The conveyor rolls 97 and 101 are provided with bearings 102 and 103 on cross pieces 2 of the frame 1 of the machine.

The operation is as follows The device is stationed in such a position that the shingles or shingle strips that are' usually cut from a sheet of rooting material by a revoluble cutter, fall upon the conveyor chains 74. The individual shingles are kept separated from each other by parallel guide plates 25 (Fig. 1), that are mounted in the guides 24 (Fig. 2). The sprocket chain 39 is driven from a sprocket on the cutter machines (not shown), and drives the sprocket 38 that is mounted on shaft 60.

The crank pin 37 on the sprocket 38 oscil lates the arm 34, thus causing the pawl 35 to turn the ratchet-wheel 33 step by step. The shaft 30 carrying the ratchet-wheel 33 is provided with a brake-wheel 32 for the purpose of making provision to prevent this shaft from being turned inadvertently, the friction band itself not being shown on the'drawing, as these devices are common and well known. The step by step revolution of the shaft 30 causes the pinion 41 to drive the gear 42 thus revolving the shaft 4, and causing the chains 9 to travel in an anti-clockwise direction as viewed in Fig. 1. As the cams 13 on the shafts 12 contact with the stationary cam operating angle irp ns 15, these cams are turned so that the arms 26 carried by the shafts 12 of these cams are caused to project outward. When the extension 14 on cams 13 pass into the cutaway portion 15 of the cam operating angle irons 15, the toe 13 of the cam turns further to the right thus pern'iitting the arms 26 to fall suddenly a short distance by gravity, so that the top surfaces thereon assume a horizontal position with the recesses 27 seated upon the shaft 28. The purpose of having the supporting arms 26 drop suddenly is, so that when the requisite number of shingles have been piled in one package or bundle, another packages, or series of packages, will be started uponv the next set of supporting arms. The number of teeth in the ratchet-wheel 33 is so proportioned that the arms 26 will be moved downwardly a. distance corresponding to the thickness of a shingle each time a shingle is brought forward by means of the conveyor chains 74, and the parts are so proportioned that the number of shingles brought forward will synchronizewith the downward travel of the supporting arms. At the same time the ratchet-wheel 33 serves as a counter for the number of shingles, one revolution of this ratchet-wheel corresponding to one package or bundle of shingles. In case it is desired to reset the arms 26 this can readily be done by lifting the pawl and turning the crank arm by hand the desired amount.

arms 26 are permitted to drop suddenly as above describedfthe bottom boards 6 upon which the shingles are to be piled, are automatically fed to these supporting arms as follows: As the shaft is being driven by the sprocket chain 39, the sprocket chain 63 passing over the sprocket 62 on shaft 60 drives the sprocket 64 and pull-roll 65 which also drives the pull-roll 68. A number of boards 6 for the shingles to be collected on, are placed in the magazine 56, and as the sprocket 45 is driven by the sprocket chain M from the sprocket 43 on shaft 30, the series of sprocket chains 48 (Fig. 6) are driven and the projections 53 (Fig. 4) disposed thereon at proper intervals catch against the back edge of the bottom board I; and move it initially until itis caught between the pull-rolls 65 and 68, whereupon it is projected by means of these pull-rolls upon the supporting arms 26. It is to'be understood that by means of this device, one package of shingles can be stacked or collected at a time, or a series of packages can be simultaneously collected or stacked, in which case the corresponding number of boards for the bottom of the plurality of packageswould be fed in the manner above described. The arms 26 are made adjustable longitudinally along the shafts 12 so that the device can be operated to suit different conditions.

After the bottom boards I) have been laid upon the supporting arms 26 and these arms done by the crank pin 82 causing the connecting rod 81 to pull upwardly at intervals upon the crank arm 78 thus turning the shaft 7 6 and causing the spring arms 87 to press properly against the edges of the shingles as they are being collected.- The slot 80 in the arm 81 is made of considerable length, so that there is enough play to render it unnecessary for the spring 85 to turn the shaft 76 more than av short distance thereby bringing the spring arms 87 only a short distance away from the edges of the shingles.

When the supporting arms 26 descend and pass between the conveyor rollers 101, the packages of shingles are caused to rest upon these rollers and as the same are driven by means of the spiral gear 90 on shaft 60 through spiral gear 91, shaft 92, sprocket chain 95, sprockets 98, and sprocket chain 100, the pac ages of shingles are moved away by these conveyer rolls. Topboards may be placed thereon and bands may be applied thereto, to bind the packages and prepare the same for shipment. Just prior to the time when the supporting I claim 1. In a device of the character described,

traveling means for receiving shingles, and means for feeding shingles thereto and for automatically moving said traveling means a distanceapproximately equal to the thickness of a shingle each time a shingle is fed thereto, and means for pressing against the edges of said shingles to align the same.

2. In a device of the character described, traveling means for receiving shingles, means for feeding shingles thereto and automatically moving said .traveling means a distance ap-' proximately equal to the thickness of a shingle each time a shingle is fed thereto, and pressing members for the edges of said shingles operated at intervals.

3. In a device of the character described,

traveling means for receiving shingles, means for feeding shingles thereto and automatically moving said traveling means a distance approximately equal to the thickness of a shingle each time a shingle is fed thereto, and spring arms operated at intervals for pressing against the edge of shingles when received upon said traveling means.

4. In a device'of the character described, vertically traveling means for receiving shingles, means for periodically feeding boards to said traveling means and means for piling a plurality of shingles on each one of said boards.

5. In a device of the character described, traveling means having shingle receiving receptacles, means for feeding a bottom board and a predetermined number of shingles successively to each receptacle and for automatically movingsaid traveling means a distance approximately equal to the thickness of a shingle each time a shingle is fed thereto.

6. In a device of the character described, traveling means having shingle receiving receptacles, means for feeding a bottom board and a predetermined number of shingles successively to each receptacle and for automatically moving said traveling means a distance approximately equal to the thickness of a shingle each time a shingle is fed thereto,

and means for automatically removing packages of shingles from said traveling means.

7. In a device of the character described, traveling means carrying pivoted arms for receiving shingles, cams operatively integral with'eachof said arms and means engaging said cams which will permit said arms to turn suddenly a'short distanceon their pivots into. a horizontal position at a predetermined point in their travel.

8. In a device of the character described, traveling means carrying pivoted arms for receiving shingles, cams operatively integral with each of said arms and means engaging said cams which will permit said arms to turn suddenly a short distance on their pivots into a horizontal position at'a predetermined point in their travel and means for feeding shingles to said arms.

, 9. In a device of the character described, traveling means carrying pivoted arms for receiving shingles, cams operatively integral with each of said arms, means engaging said cams which will permit said arms to turn suddenly a short distance on their pivots into a horizontal position, means for then feeding shingles thereto and a conveyer for automatically removing said shingle-s from said traveling means.

10. In a device of the character described, traveling means having shingle receiving rereceptacles, means for feeding a bottom board and a predetermined number of shingles suecessively to each receptacle and a conveyer for automatically removing said board and shingles from said traveling means.

11. In a device of the character described, traveling means having shingle receiving rcceptacles, means for feeding a bottom board and a predetermined number of shingles successively to each receptacle and parallel conveyer rolls for automatically removing said board and shingles from said traveling means When a predetermined number of shingles have been received thereby.

12. In a device of the'character described, traveling chains carrying pivoted rods on which supporting arms are mounted, cams keyed to said rods, stationary cams engaging said first mentioned cams during a portion of their travel to maintain the arms in an inclined position, said arms turning sud denly into a horizontal position at the end of said engagement. 1

13. In a deviceof the. character described, a conveyer for shingles, a series of movable supports controlled by cams operatively integral therewith for "collecting shin.- gles andmeans operating upon said cams to maintain the supports in an inclined position during a portion of their travel and to then permit said supports to move successively into position to receive shingles from said conveyer when a predetermined number of shingles have been placed upon a preceding support.

14. In a device of the character described, a conveyer for shingles, a series of sets of pivoted arms carried by chains for collecting shingles brought forward by said conveyer, cams operatively inte ral with each set of arms and means including stationary cams engaging said first mentioned cams for moving said sets of arms successively into position to receive shingles from said conveyer when a predetermined number of shingles have been placed upon a preceding set of arms.

15. In a device of the character described, a conveyer for shingles, a series of movable supports for collecting shingles brought forward by said conveyer and means including cams operatively integral with said supports and a cam stationary operating member for moving said supports first into an inclined position and then successively into position to receive shingles when a predetermined number of shingles have been placed upon a preceding support.

16. In a device of the character described,

traveling means carrying pivoted arms for receiving shingles, cams operatively integral with each of said arms and means for engaging said cams during the travel of said arms to cause the arms to successively take an inclined position and to then turn suddenly into a horizontal position at a predetermined point in their travel.

17. In combination, traveling means carrying pivoted arms for receiving shingles, cams operatively integral with each of said arms, means for engaging said cams during the travel of said arms to cause the arms to successively take an inclined position and to then turn suddenly into a horizontal position ata predetermined point in their travel, means for feeding a bottom board to each arm in its inclined position and a conveyer for feeding a predetermined number ofv shingles to each arm after it takes its horizontal position. v

18. In a device of the character described, traveling means carrying pivoted sets of arms for receiving shingles, cams operatively integral with each of said sets of arms and means operating upon said cams to prevent said sets of arms from entering into a shingle collecting position until a predetermined point in the travel of said sets of arms is reached, said means then permitting the sets of arms to move successively into position to receive shingles.

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.

PAUL J. PAFFEN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2551557 *Aug 1, 1947May 1, 1951Hoe & Co RMachine for finishing the pages to be dealt with in bookbinding machines
US2684161 *Feb 17, 1950Jul 20, 1954Schulze And Burch Biscuit CompMaterial counting and stacking apparatus
US2793857 *Jun 11, 1954May 28, 1957Franklin Rauschenberger WilliaSection stacker
US3088604 *May 16, 1960May 7, 1963Bonnierfoeretagen AbApparatus for stacking newspapers and the like
US3591019 *Jun 26, 1969Jul 6, 1971Weber & Co Inc H GStacker for cases and the like
US6322315Oct 4, 1999Nov 27, 2001C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Web stacker and separator apparatus and method
US6641358 *Nov 27, 2001Nov 4, 2003C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Co., Inc.Web stacker and separator apparatus and method
US6832886Jul 27, 2001Dec 21, 2004C. G. Bretting Manufacturing Co., Inc.Apparatus and method for stacking sheets discharged from a starwheel assembly
US6877740Jul 30, 2003Apr 12, 2005C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Starwheel feed apparatus and method
US7219887Apr 12, 2005May 22, 2007C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Starwheel feed apparatus and method
US7364398Nov 23, 2004Apr 29, 2008C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Apparatus and method for stacking sheets discharged from a starwheel assembly
US7470102Sep 27, 2002Dec 30, 2008C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Co., Inc.Apparatus and method for insertion of separating means into a forming stack of sheets discharged from a starwheel assembly
US20030082044 *Sep 27, 2002May 1, 2003Gendron Jeffrey A.Apparatus and method for stacking and separating sheets discharged from a starwheel assembly
US20050023746 *Jul 30, 2003Feb 3, 2005Michler James R.Starwheel feed apparatus and method
US20050087925 *Nov 23, 2004Apr 28, 2005C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Co., Inc.Apparatus and method for stacking sheets discharged from a starwheel assembly
US20050258589 *Apr 12, 2005Nov 24, 2005C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Starwheel feed apparatus and method
USRE42267Jun 29, 2007Apr 5, 2011C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Starwheel feed apparatus and method
WO2001025125A1 *Oct 4, 2000Apr 12, 2001C.G. Bretting Manufacturing Company, Inc.Web stacker and separator apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/789.6, 414/790, 198/802, 414/901, 414/790.4, 198/431
International ClassificationB65B35/50
Cooperative ClassificationY10S414/115, B65H33/16, B65B35/50
European ClassificationB65H33/16, B65B35/50