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Publication numberUS1701764 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1929
Filing dateApr 28, 1927
Priority dateApr 28, 1927
Publication numberUS 1701764 A, US 1701764A, US-A-1701764, US1701764 A, US1701764A
InventorsRoebuck Alfred L
Original AssigneeRoebuck Alfred L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ice-cream freezer
US 1701764 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 12, 1929. 1,701,764

v A. L. ROEBUCK' ICE CREAM FREEZER Filed April 28, 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet l ATTORNEY Feb. 12, 1929. 1,701,764

' A. L. ROEBUCK ICE CREAM FREEZER Filed April 28, 1927 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 & 35 r Fig; 2

15 '7 23 n. V 2r LT It "I 34 |33 I v 315-31 1! 2.9 E134! J0 32 :i aa- H /v I. k 3 i 12 HIP/f ,HHH

' VENT-2%? $4 M BY%I 9 i Q ATTORNEY Patented Feb. 12, 1929.

UNITED STATES 1,101,764 PATENT OFFICE,"

' ALFRED n BOEZB'UGK, 0 wmcnnnnon, nAssAonusE'rrs.

ICE-CREAM FREEZER.

Application filed April 28, 1927. Serial No. 187,381.

This invention relates to that class of devices known as ice-cream freezers, and more particularly to the type of ice cream freezer having a closure for the crushed ice ,recepi tacle.

heretofore the upper portion of the freezer tub has been provided with a non-removable closure and the crushed ice has been introduced through an opening in the bottom of the tub, thus making it necessary to turn the tub up-side-down inorder to introduce the ice. In other constructions it has been necessary to remove the entire closure from the upper portion of the tub in order to fill the tub with crushed ice.

The present invention therefore relates to a novel form of freezer the tub of which may be easily filled by introducing the crushed ice through an opening in the closure, thus making it feasible to provide the tub with a tight closure that may be permanently secured to the tub.

An important feature of the present invention resides in an ice containing tub or receptacle having a closure, and a cream can supported eccentrically within the tub so that a relatively large space is provided in the tub at one side of the can and into, which the crushed ice may be readily introduced through an opening in the closure.

Another feature of the invention resides in the sloping construction of the closure whereby crushed ice placed upon the closure may be easily directed through an opening in the closure into said large space within the tub.

Another feature of the invention resides in the novel construction of the cover for the cream can, and still another feature resides in the construction of the dasher used to scrape the frozen cream from the sides of the can. c

Other features of the invention and novel combination of parts in addition to the above will be hereinafter described in connection.

with the accompanying drawings which illustrate one good practical form of the invention.

In the drawings Fig. l is a perspective view of an ice cream freezer constructed-in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the ice cream freezer of Fig, 1, the covers for the cream can and ice receiving opening in the top closure being omitted; and, v 1 I Fig. 3 on an enlarged scale is a vertical sectional view through the freezer of Fig. 1.

In carrying out the present invention the crushed ice is confined ina receptacle or tub 10 of any well known or preferred construction, but this tub is preferably formed of wood in order to take advantage of the wellknown heat insulating properties of a wooden receptacle. The tub 10 may have the usual wooden bottom 11 and the required number of hoops 12 for securing the staves in place to form the woodenitub; and the interior of the tub is preferably treated with parafiinef or other water-repellant substance, as is customary to make the tub water tight.

As above stated the upper portion of the tub is provided with a closure plate 18 which serves to confine the cold air in the space above the crushed ice and otherwise helps to increase the refrigeration properties of the ice-containing receptacle 10. The construction of the closure 13 is important since it should be snugly fitted to the upper portion of the tub to confine the cold air within the tub, while at the same time it should be so constructed that crushedice may be easily introduced into the tub. In order to meet these requirements, in accordance with the present invention, the closure 13 is permanently secured to the upper portion ofthe tub and the cream-receiving can 14 is mounted eccentrically within the tub 10 so as to provide a relatively large ice receiving space between the can it and one side of the tub, as will be apparent from Fig. 3. The arrangement of the can lt eccentrically within the tub 10 serves also to provide a suf ficient space at one side of the can ltto permit the formation of a relatively large icereceiving opening 15 in the closure 13, and I opening the closure is provided with the upstanding annular flange 16 which surrounds and embraces the upper portion of the can, as clearly shown in Fig. 3 and the end portion of the can is preferably bent down vardly around the annular flange 16 as indicated at 17. This gives the can leta smooth rounded upper end and permits the portions of the can engaging the closure 13 to be rigidly soldered or otherwise secured to the closure. The upperend of the can l t, it will be noted, projects upwardly a short distance from the closure 13, to prevent water upon the closure from finding its way into the cream can. The closure 13 is preferably given the dished or concaved construction shown to cause water deposited upon any portion of the closure to drain into the ice receiving opening 1-5, and to this end it will be noted that an annular groove or drain 18 is formed in the upper face of the closure to facilitate drainage of water from about the neck of the can 1 1 into the opening 15.

Various constructions might be employed for securing the closure 13 tightly and nonremovably to the upper portion of the tub l0, and in the construction shown this is accomplished by providing a roore 19 in the upper end of the tub 10 adapted to re ceive an annular flange 20 projecting downwardly from the outer periphery of the closure 13. The closure 13 preferably its tightly within the grooved upper end portion of the tub as shown, and the upper face of the closure may lie flush with the upper end portion of the tub. The flanged portion 20 of the closure may be rigidly secured in the groove 19 by a waterproof adhesive or cement, and the closure 13 may be further secured to the tub 10 by the screws 21.

The closure construction just described-is such that it may be secured to the tub 10 after the latter has been completely assen'ibled, which is a highly desirable feature.

The ice-receiving opening 15 in the closure is provided with a cover plate 22 which preterably has a downwardly extending curved flange 23 which fits snugly in the opening 15 and the cover 22 is also preferably provided with a-laterally extending flange 2el which rests upon the upper face of the closure and helps to prevent the escape of air from the interior of the tub when the cover 22 is in place. The cover plate 22 may be provided with a knob 25 adapted to be engaged by the fingers when the cover plate is to be applied to or removed from the opening 15.

Since the portion of the cam 14: which eX- tends upwardly through the closure 13 will not be subjected to 'the cold temperature within the tub, the can should not extend upwardly through the closure plate any further than is necessary to prevent salt water from finding its way into the cream can. It therefore follows that the outer portion 17 of the can which projects upwardly from the upper face of the closure 13 may not be long enough to firmly retain the can cover 26 in place. The cover 26 is therefore given the novel construction shown, wherein it will be noted that the cover is provided with a downwardly extending flange 27 which fits the inner annular wall of the can 14: and projects downwardly therein a sufficient distance to hold the cover 26 firmly in place upon the can. In order to prevent salt water from finding its way into the can the cover 26 is provided with a second annular flange 28 which surrounds and embraces the outer portion 17 of the can. As a result of this construction the upper end of the can is well protected from salt water and the cover is firmly secured to the upper end of the can. In order to facilitate the removal of the cover 26 from the upper end of the can the outer face of the flange 28 preferably slopes inwardly in a downward direction, as shown, in order that the cover may be more firmly gripped by the hand to remove the same.

Vithin the cream can 14 is mounted a dasher or agitator which may have the usual construction except for the novel formation or" the scrapers to be described. This dasher has the central shaft 29 the lower end of which rotates in a bearing recess formed in the can bottom 30 and the upper end of the shaft 29 is rotatably mounted within a hole forn'ied in the can cover 26. The dasher frame or shaft 29 is provided with the laterally extending arms 31 to which the scraper blades 32 are loosely secured by screws 33, as is customary. The scraper blades 32, which may be formed of wood or metal,' differ from the scraper blades employed heretofore in that-the scraping edge of each of these blades is provided with a number of grooves or cutaway portions 34:, the arrangement being such that each scraper will engage the side of the can at intervals throughout its length and not continuously throughout its length, as has been customary heretofore. This novel construction of the scraper blades makes the dasher easier to turn because of the reduced scraping action of the blades, and it also serves to break up the layer of frozen cream scraped from the side walls of the can 14. The notches at the opposite sides of the scraper are disposed out of alignment with each other as shown, so that frozen cream not removed from the side of the can by one scraper 32 will be scraped oil by the other. The dasher is rotated manually during the freezing operation by a crank handle 35 having a hub portion adapted to tit the squared upper end of the shaft 29, and the tub 10 may be provided with a handle or bail 36 to facilitate carrying the same. The dasher need not be rotated continuously during the freezing operation since all that is necessary is to rotate the dasher once in a while to scrape scribed.

the frozen cream from the sides of the cream can, and the notched construction of the scraper blades 32 will make the dasher easier to turn than the dashers employed heretofore.

As a result of the novel construction shown and described whereby'the cream can 14. is mounted eccentrically within the tub 10, a relatively large space formed within the tub at one side of the can adapted to receive large pieces of ice which are easily introduced into this space through the ice-receiving opening 15, and when the ice has been introduced into the freezer tub 10 it may be easily worked under and around the can 14: by merely shaking the tub. After the tub has been filled with crushed ice, water may be poured upon the closure 13 to wash theremaining particles of ice and salt water from the same, and this may be done without danger of water entering the cream can, due to the construction of the cover 26 above de- After the tub has, been filled with a mixture of crushed ice and salt, the cover plate 22 may be inserted in the ice-receiving opening 15 and this will serve to completely close the air chamber formed in the tub above the crushed ice, and due to the tight construction of the closure 13 and cover plate 22 ice cream or other foods may be kept in a frozen condition in the present freezer much longer than it can in the other types of freezers now in use. Furthermore, if desired, the relatively large space provided between the can l tand wall of the tub may be utilized as a refrigeration receptacle in which bottles of ginger ale or other articles to be kept cold may be placed.

What is claimed is 1. An ice cream freezer, comprising in combination, a cream can, a tub, a closure for the tub having a can receiving opening and an opening for introducing ice into the tub, and the closure being provided with a concaved upper surface that promotes drainage from all portions of the closure into said ice receiving opening.

2. An ice cream freezer, comprising in combination, a cream can, a tub, a closure constructed to be tightly secured to the tub and provided with a can receiving opening formed eccentrically within the closure to support the cream can closer to one side of the tub than the other, and the closure being upper surface that drains intosaid openin 3. An ice cream freezer, comprising in combination, a cream can, a tub, a closure for the tub having a can receiving opening formed near one side of the tub to support the can eccentrically within the tub, and the closure being provided with an opening for introducing ice into the tub and having its upper surface shaped to promote drainage from different points around the can opening into said ice receiving opening.

4. An ice cream freezer, comprising in combination, a cream can, a tub, a closure for the upper end of the tub provided with a. can receiving opening positioned, to mount the cream can eccentrically within the tub to provide an enlarged space between a wall of the tub and the can, and said closure being provided with an ice receiving opening with in said enlarged space and a concaved upper surface that drains into said opening.

5. An ice cream freezer, comprising in combination, a cream can, a tub, a closure for the upper portion of the tub provided with acan receiving opening positioned to support the cream can eccentrically within the tub to provide an enlarged space between a -wall of the tub and the cream can, said closure being provided with an ice receiving opening located in said enlarged space and a sloping upper surface that drains intosaid opening, and a cover for closing the ice receiving opening.

6. An ice cream freezer, comprising in combination, a cream can, a tub, a sunken closure for the upper end of the tub having a raised outer periphery formed to pro-mote drainage inwardly away from its periphery,

said closure being further provided with a can receiving opening adapted to receive the cream can and an ice receiving opening formed so that water poured upon the closure will drain into the tub through said ice receiving opening.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

ALFRED L. ROEBUCK.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2510057 *Apr 24, 1944Jun 6, 1950Inst Divi Thomae FoundationEvaporator
US4332145 *Feb 9, 1981Jun 1, 1982Yuhasz Joseph MSystem for making frozen food article
US4488817 *Jul 7, 1983Dec 18, 1984Nippon Light Metal Co., Ltd.Device for making frozen confections
WO1991007878A1 *Oct 27, 1990Jun 13, 1991Hugo Kunzi KommanditgesellschaProcess and device for the production of edible ice
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/592.13, 217/76, 366/312, 220/560.4, 366/149
International ClassificationA23G9/04, A23G9/12
Cooperative ClassificationA23G9/12
European ClassificationA23G9/12