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Publication numberUS1702226 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 12, 1929
Filing dateJun 7, 1928
Priority dateJun 7, 1928
Publication numberUS 1702226 A, US 1702226A, US-A-1702226, US1702226 A, US1702226A
InventorsHugo Bruninghaus
Original AssigneeHenkel Clauss Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Composite article and method of making same
US 1702226 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 12, 1929. 1,702,226

H. BRUNINGHAUS COMPOSITE ARTICLE AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME Filed June '7, 1928 Arrow/v5) Patented Feb. l2, 1 UNITED STATES 1,702,226 PATENT OFFICE.

HUGO BBUNINOHAUS, O1 WONT, OHIO, ASSIGNOR TO THE HEKKEL-GLAUSS OOI- rm, FREMONT, OHIO, A CORPORATION OF OHIO.

comm ARTICLE AND METHOD OF MAKING sum.

Application filed June 7, 192a. seria1- Ho. asaua.

i The invention relates articles made in part of celluloid or pyroxylin, and in art {of some other substance of a different 0 aracter such for example as metal, and the in- 5 vention has 'to do more especially with the means for securing together the parts composed of the different materials.

In the making of various articles composed chiefly or essentially of metal, it has been sought to secure pleasing and ornamental effects by cementing to the surface of the metal, sheets, plates or blocks of celluloid or pyroxylin. These latter materials can be produced in excellent imitation ofmother of pearl and in various colors so that very pleasing effects can be secured with them, but prior to my present improvements it has not been possible effectively and satisfactorily to secure the celluloid to the metal by cementing, and to se 2 cure the parts by rivets or the like is both more costly and not satisfactory as to appearance.

The chief objects of the invention are comprised in the provision of an improved construction and an improved method by the use of which composite articles made in part of celluloid and in part of metal, or substances other than metal reacting similarly to cements suitable for use'with celluloid, can have their arts secured together effectively and satisactorily b cement and at low cost.

Other objects more or less incidental or ancillary to the above will be apparent from the following description of some of the preferred embodiments of the invention and of the preferred procedure followed in producin said embodiments. In the description reference is had to the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings,

Fig. 1 is a side view of a nail file embodying my improvements;

Figb 2 is a section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a side view of a nail file showing a modified form of construction;

Fi 4 is a side view of a paper knife embodymg the invention; IpFig. 5 is a section on the line 5-5 of Fi 6 is a side view of a pair of shears embodying the invention; I

Fig. 7 is a section on the line 77 of Fig. 6. Referring first to Figs. 1 and 2, the nail file illustrated comprises the usual steel blade portionl with integral handle section 2. The lade end of the handle portion has a hole 3 punched or otherwise formed therein and the other end of the handle portion 2 has a similarly formed hole 4. In the holes 3 and 4 are placed solid blocks 5 and 6, respectively, of celluloid, these blocks being preferabl of approximately the same thickness as t e portions of the steel handle ad'acent thereto.

'On the opposite sides of the andle portibn 2 are sheets or plates 7, 7*"of celluloid or the like which may be made tosimulate mother of pearl or may be given various colors if desired. The finishin plates 7, 7 are secured to the steel handle of t e file by cementing them i to the metal and to the celluloid blocks 5 and 6 with cement suitable for use with celluloid, a cement with a celluloid or lacquer base being preferred.

In attaching the celluloid plates to the metal handle the procedure is quite simple. The handle having been formed with the holes or openings 3 and 4 by punching, or

otherwise, the blocks 5 and 6 of celluloid, which can advantageously be punched from scrap sheet material, are placed in the said openings. The blocksmay be firmly secured in'the openings, as by driving them in with forced fits and in many instances such securing of the blocks is to be preferred, partic ularly if an ornamental sheet or plate of celluloid is to be applied to but one side or surface of the piece of metal or the like; Where such ornamental sheets are to be applied 'to' opposite surfaces of the metal such ri id securin of the celluloid inserts or locks, thong preferable, is not so essential. The inserts or blocks 3 and 6 having been placed in the openings and the surfaces of the metal handle having been cleaned, if need be, the celluloid cement is, in any suitable manner, applied to the spread over the inner surface of the celluloid sheets 7, 7 and the latter then applied to the sides of the metal handle 2 and firmly clamped thereon until the cement hashad time to set. It .will be understood, of course, that the cement may be applied both to the metal surface of the handle 2 and to the inner sides of the sheets 7, 7 before clam ing the latter to the handle. The celluloi cement when applied to the surface of the celluloid sheets 7, 7 and of the celluloid blocks or inserts 5 and 6, somewhat softens the surfaces of the solid celluloid parts and then when the cement sets and hardens the celluloid parts 5, 6 and 7 are, so to speak, integrally welded together. The strong connection thus formed between the inserts 5, 6 and the finishing plates 7, 7 supplements the cement connection between the plates 7, 7 and the metal handle 2 in such a manner that the finishing plates are eifectivel and permanently secured to the metal. n previous attempts to secure such celluloid finishing plates to articles of metal or the like it has been found impossible to satisfactorily secure the finishing plates to the metal by cementing, the finishing plates soon loosening and separating, especially where said plates are relatively thin and have a tendency to curl or cap up.

The use of solid blocks or inserts of celluloid not only has the advantage that such blocks can be rigidly and strongly secured in the body of metal or the like (as by using a forced fit as above described), but in addition they avoid the use of any considerable mass of liquid or soft cement in contact with the finishing plates with resultant correspondingly large shrinkage when the cement dries andsets. For example, I have attempted to secure the finishin -plates 7, 7 to the metal handle b the use 0? soft cement in the openings 3 an 4, but the contraction of the relatively large mass of this cement is so marked and so strong that it draws the relatively thin celluloid sheets 7, 7 into the openings thus forming unsightly depressions in the finished handle as well as settingup severe strains in the finished celluloid structure which tend to weaken it and render itless able to resist mechanical shocks and stresses. It is to be understood that the solid block of celluloid can be introduced into the openings in the body of metal or the like by inserting plastic celluloid or thick celluloid cement in the opening and allowing it to harden therein before the finishing plates are cemented on the metal. However, I prefer to employ the method previously described since it ends itself to easy handling of the parts withresultan-t rapid production.

The nail file illustrated in Fig. 3 of the drawing is similar to that shown in Figs. 1 and 2 except that elongated rectangular openings 8 and 9 are formed in the metal handle of the file and correspondingly shaped solid celluloid blocks 10 and 11 are secured in the openings. Obviously the openings and inserts can be'made of any form or shape best suited to the requirements of the articular form and construction of the article being produced. Aside from the form of the inserts the construction in Fig. 3 is similar to that of Figs. 1 and 2 and the procedure in making the handle is the same as above described.

In Figs. 4 and 5 of the drawin is illustrated a paper knife comprising a b ade 12 with inte a1 metal shank or handle 13 and finishing plates 1&, 15 secured to the opposite flat surfaces of the handle. In this case the handle is formed with six openin s 16, 16 in of cel instance each shear handle 18 is formed with a number of openings 19 in which are secured solid inserts 20 of celluloid, and finishing sheets or plates 21 of celluloid are cemented to the opposite fiat surfaces of the handle 18 and to the celluloid inserts 20.

By the use of my improved method composite articles of celluloid and metal or the like having exceedingly pleasing appearance and great durability, can be produced very easily and at low cost.

From the above described illustrations of the application of my improved method it will be apparent that it is applicable to a great variety of articles and it will also be obvious that the procedure followed in making the composite atricles can be varied. It will therefore be understood that the invention is not limited to the articles illustrated nor to the particular procedure described, but that the scope of the invention is indicated by the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. The process of securing a solid piece of celluloid to the surface of a body composed of material other than celluloid, said process comprising forming an opening in said body through its said surface; securing a solid piece of celluloid in said opening; and cementin the first named piece of celluloid to the surface of said body and to the surface of the piece of celluloid secured in its said opening.

2. The process of securing a relatively thin strip or sheet of celluloid to the surface of a body composed of material other than celluloid, which comprises forming an opening in said latter body through its said surface; securing a solid piece of celluloid in saido ening with a surface thereof substantially ush with the surface of the said body adjacent the opening; and cementing the thin strip uloid to the said surfaces of the body and the piece of celluloid in the opening. 3. The process of securing solid bodies of celluloid to opposite surfaces of a solid bod composed of material other than celluloi which'comprises forming an opening through the latter body; placin a piece of solid celluloid in the opening; an cementing the bodies of celluloid to the opposite surfaces of the other body and to the solid celluloid in the said opening.

4. The process of securing solid bodies of celluloid to opposite surfaces of a solid bod com osed of material other than celluloi whic comprises forming an opening throu h the latter body; placing a piece of solid ce uopposite surfaces of the other body and of the.

piece of celluloid in the said opening.

5. The process of securing relatively thin strips or sheets of celluloid to opposite surfaces of a solid body composed of material other than celluloid, which comprises forming on opening extending throughthe said body from one of the opposite surfaces to the other; inserting a piece of solid celluloid in the opening with opposite surfaces thereof substantially flush with'the said opposite surfaces of said bod ;andcementing the 'stri s of .celluloid to t e opposite surfaces of tie body and of the piece of celluloid in the opening.

6. A composite article comprising in combination a solid body of material other than celluloid formed with an opening therein; an insert of solid celluloid secured in said opening; and a piece of celluloid covering the ,celluloid insert and the adjacent surface of thesolid body and .cemented to said surface and the insert.

7 A composite article comprlslng in combination a solid body of material other than celluloid formed with anopening therein; an

' insert of solidcelluloid secured in said opening with a surface thereof approximately flush with the adjacent surface of said body;

. and a piece of celluloid on the said surfaces of the solid body and the insert and cemented thereto.

8. A-composite article comprising in combination a solid body of material other than celluloid formed with an opening extending through the body fromone to another of two opposite surfaces thereof; an insert of solid celluloid in said opening; and pieces of celluloid cemented to the said opposite surfaces of the body and to the said celluloid'insert.

9. A composite article comprising in com bination a metal part-formed with an opening therein; an insert of solid celluloid secured in said opening with a surface thereof approximately flush with a surface of the metal part; and a piece of celluloid on the said surfaces of the celluloid insert and metal part and cemented thereto.

10. A composite article comprising in compieces of celluloid cemented to the said opposite surfaces of the metal part and to said celluloid insert.

11. -A nail file comprising in combination a metal file part proper; a metal handle part integral therewith and formed with an opening extending through it from one to the other of its opposite surfaces; an insert of solid celluloid-in said opening; and pieces of celluloid cemented to the said opposite surfaces of the handle part and to the said celluloidinsert.

12. A composite article comprisin in combination a solid bod of material 0t er than celluloid formed wit a plurality of openings therein; inserts of solid celluloid secured in said openings; and apiece of celluloid covermg the celluloid inserts and the adjacent surface of the solid body andcemented to said surface and. the inserts.

13. A composite article comprisin in com bination a solid bod of material ot er than celluloid formed wit a lurality of openings therein; inserts of soli celluloid secured in said openings with surfaces of the inserts ,approximately flush with the adjacentsurface of said body; and a piece of celluloid on. the said surfaces of the solid body and inserts and cemented thereto.

14. A composite article comprising in combination a solid bod of material other than celluloid formed with a plurality of openings extending through the body from one to another of two op osite surfaces thereof; inserts of solid celluloid in said openin and pieces of celluloid cemented to the sai opposite surfaces of the body and to the said celluloid inserts.

In testimony whereof, I hereunto afiix my signature.

HUGO BRUNINGHAUS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2738977 *Jul 28, 1950Mar 20, 1956Riley Ralph EBowling pin
US2756504 *Aug 9, 1954Jul 31, 1956Levine Hyman SShade guide
US3840990 *Jan 31, 1974Oct 15, 1974Laurenti IMulti-thickness plastic handled scissors
US4438565 *Jun 18, 1980Mar 27, 1984Hough Industries LimitedHandle for a hand tool
US6050269 *Sep 21, 1999Apr 18, 2000Park; Sam WungNail scissors
US20050098188 *Oct 3, 2003May 12, 2005Dalibor BlazekFile, particularly nail file
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/76.4, 156/298, 30/345, 156/293, 30/341, 428/140, 264/273, 264/322
International ClassificationB26B13/00, B26B3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB26B3/00, B26B13/00
European ClassificationB26B3/00, B26B13/00