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Publication numberUS1702286 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1929
Filing dateDec 14, 1926
Priority dateDec 14, 1926
Publication numberUS 1702286 A, US 1702286A, US-A-1702286, US1702286 A, US1702286A
InventorsWalker William D
Original AssigneeWalker William D
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dice-throwing machine
US 1702286 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 19, 1929. 1,702,286

W. D. WALKER DI GE THROWING MACHINE Filed Dec. 14, 1926 INVENTOR.

Wm.D. VVal/cer Patented Feb. 19, 1929.

UNITED STATES WILLIAM 1). warm or who, cams-01mm.

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Application filed December 14, 192B. 1 Serial No. 154,707.

This invention relates to dice throwing machines, my principal object being to provide a machine for the purpose and 1n which a set of dice is permanently installed having 5 a simple hand operated mechanism by means of which the dice may be caused to be whirled and tumbled about, without any manual control ormanipulation of the dice or any trick Y cry being possible, and without the use of a coin or other means to initially control or release the movement of the hand operating means. j

I have in mind to use this machine with a specialset of dice as set forth in my c0- pending application on the same, filed December 14, 1926, Serial No. 154,706, in connection with a premium dispensing advertising system to be operated in conjunction with a merchandise dispensing store. Briefl this system consists in laying aside or a lowing to accumulate a certain amount or value in cash or merchandise, as a premium for the patrons of the store, and giving every purchaser of any article in the store one or more chances to operate the dice throwing machine. One or more oftsuch machines would be located in the store in a convenient location and the throwing of the dice so that the assume a predetermined relationship to eac other will win the accumulated premium for the operator. No charge of any kind is to be made for the chance thus given the customer, his right to operate the machine being based solely upon his legitimate purchase of the standard merchandise carried by the store and the number of chances given him will dependentircly upon the amount or value of his purchase. A storeoperating with my system will therefore draw. trade, since the general ublic will know that besides obtaining stanc ard merchandise at standard prices, they will have a chanceto obtain a remium merely by patronizing that particu ar store. I

Of course it will be understood that merely perating the machine andthrowing the dice does not necessarily win the operator a premium, since as above stated, the dice must be disposed in a certain predetermined relation before the premium is given away. lnasmuch, however. as the construction of the machine prevents the possibility of any manipulation of the dice being had such as might give an expert a better chance than another, it will be seen that every person operating the machine has an equal chance with i any oth er person to win the premium. i

sides of the ring 3 at intervals, these In A further object of the invention is to roduce a simple and inexpensive device an yet one which will be exceedingly effective for the purpose for which it is designed.

These objects I. accomplish by means of suchstructureand relative arrangement of parts as wall fully appear b a perusal of the following specification} an claims. a In the drawings similar charactcrs of reference indicate corresponding parts in the several views:

Fig. 1 is a sectional elevation of my improved machine. Fig. 2 is a top the top cover an removed.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary crosssection on the line-3-3 of Fig. 2. i

Referring now more particularly to the characters of reference on the drawings, the numeral 1 denotes the base of the machine of suitable dimensions and preferably circular in form. Projecting upwardly from and supported on the base is a cylindrical casing 2, surmounted by a ca ring 3 in which is mounted a dome shape transparent glass 4.

Hlan view ofthe same with the dice supporting disc The cap and base are connected to each other .low is 0 same and into the cap ring, inside the casing. j j

The screw heads may if desired be sealed into the base as indicated, so asto prevent disassociation of the parts by any. unauthorized person. Centrally disposed in the enclosure formed by the above named parts is afvertical shaft 6. This'shaftis supportedat its lower end on a suitable anti-friction hearing as at 7 and journaledadjacent its upper end in a supporting member 8 mounted on and projecting upwardly from the base. On the upper end of the shaft above the support 8, a horizontal disc 9 is fixed, which disc supports a set of dice 10. The disc is located so; as to be close to the ring 3. so that all the dice are readily visible through the dome 4. Small bumpers or lugs 11 project inwardly frorbnthe elng in the same horizontal plane as the ice: It will therefore be seen: that if the disc is sbarpl rotated, the dice will be thrown aroun and outwardly. In their rotation and outward movement the dice will strike the sides of the cap and the lugs 11, resulting in the dice being effectively tumbled about.

In order to thus rotate the disc a sufficient number of times with one operation to cause all the dice in the set to be thoroughly acted on I provide the following structure:

Fixed on the shaft 6 adjacent its lower end is a ratchet wheel 12 adapted to be an gaged by a pawl 13. This pawl extends substantially at right angles to and is pivoted intermediate its ends on a horizontal arm 1 1. This arm is pivoted at one end onto the base and extends thence toward the opposite side of the base to one side of the shaft, the pawl pointing toward the opposite side of the shaft. A spring 15 acts to force the point of the pawl toward the ratchet wheel, the movement of the pawl in that direction being limited by a stop 16. A stiff spring 17 of suitable type acts on the arm 14 to force the same toward the shaft 6, the movement of the arm in that direction being limited by a stop 18. hen the arm abuts against the stop 18, and the pawl abuts against the stop 16 by the normal position of these parts the pawl will be clear of the ratchet wheel. The point of pivotal mounting of the arm relative to the shaft is such that when the arm is moved away from thestop andshaft a certain distance the pawl will move into engagement with the ratchet wheel. The ratchet wheel itself is so disposed relative to the pawl that after the pawl has thus engaged the said wheel and the arm is allowed to come bacl: to its original. position, the ratchet wheel and shaft will be rotated. The above mentioned movement is imparted to the arm by means of a horizontally movable operating trigger 19 which is pivoted onto the base beyond the free end of the arm 1% and projecting outwardly of the base through a circumferential slot 20 in the side thereof. The outer end of the trigger carries a finger pad or handle 21. A spring 22 normally holds the trigger adjacent one end of the slot, and the inner end of the trigger adjacent the free end of the arm 14. Said trigger is then in such position relative to the arm as to engage one edge of the same and move said arm away from the stop 18 when the trigger is moved toward the opposite end of the slot 20. A fixed handle or grip 23 is mounted at the other end of the slot so that the operator may readily manipulate the trigger by grasping the fixed handle and pad 21 with the thumb and one finger of one hand and contracting the same. The co-acting faces or edges of the trigger and arm are blunt and vertically disposed so as to provide for firm engagement of these members. The opposite edge of the trigger is tapered '05 however as at 24C, and the corresponding edge of the arm 14 is curled upwardly as at 25. The setting of the trigger relative to the arm is such that after the trigger has been turned on its pivot and has engaged and moved the arm a certain distance, said trigger will then clear the arm, allowing the spring 17 to return the arm to its normal position against the stop 18. The pawl, as above stated, being engaged with the ratchet wheel for the initial portion of this return movement, a rotative movement will be imparted to the shaft 6. The strength of the spring 17 is sufficient to cause such movement to be sharp or sudden, so that the shaft and disc will then rotate a considerable number of times even though the period of engagement of the pawl with the ratchet wheel is very short. By the time the arm reaches said stop the pawl will again clear the ratchet-wheel, allowing the shaft to continue to rotate with the momentum imparted thereby by the momentary engagement of the pawl with the ratchet wheel.

After the trigger has cleared the arm, and is on the opposite side of the same, the trigger will return of itself to its normal position ahead of the arm by reason of the features 2 l-25, which allow the trigger to pass under the arm in a return direction, both members having sufficient vertical resiliency to'enable such movement to take place.

It will be seen that the release of the arm from engagement with the trigger is the only thing controlling the rotation of the disc on which the dice are supported. It therefore makes no difference whether the trigger is moved slowly or rapidly. The speed of rotation of the disc and consequently the whirling and tumbling of the dice depends solely upon the strength of the spring 17 and is fixed and beyond the control of the operator, who cannot by any possible means affect such rotation. There is therefore no way for an 1111 scrupulous person to possibly manipulate the dice to his special advantage.

From the foregoing description it will be readily seen that I have produced such a device as substantially fulfills the objects of the invention as set forth herein.

While this specification sets forth in detail the present and preferred construction of the device, still in practice such deviations from such detail maybe resorted to as do not form a departure from the spirit of the invention, as defined by the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and useful and desire to secure by-Letters Patent is:

1. A dice throwing machine including a casing, a disc mounted in the casing on which to support the dice, a trigger member pivoted in the casing and projecting to the outside thereof, an arm pivoted in the casing opposite to the trigger, the arm and trigger being disposed relative to each other so that the arm will be moved for a certain distance upon moving the trigger, and will then be auto matically released from the trigger, a shaft supporting the disc, a ratchet wheel fixed on the shaft a pawl mounted on the arm to engage the wheel; the pawl and arm being disposed relative to the wheel so that when the arm is in its normal position the pawl will be clear of the wheel but when said arm is moved from such position the pawl will. engage the ratchet wheel and will rotate said wheel when the arm is then retracted, and a spring aeting on the arm to thus retract the same and tending to maintain it in its normal position.

2. A dice throwing machine including a casing, a disc mounted in the casing on which to support the dice, a shaft supportin the disc, a ratchet wheel fixed on the shaft, an arm mounted in the casing, a pawl mounted on the arm to engage the wheel; the pawl and arm being disposed relative to the wheel so that when the arm is in its normal position the pawl will be clear of the wheel but when said arm is moved from such position the pawl will engage the ratchet wheel and will rotate said wheel when the arm is then retracted, a spring acting on the arm to thus re 7 tract the same and tending to maintain it in its normal position, and means operable at will from outside the casing for moving the 3. A dice throwin machine including a casing, a disc mounte in the casing on which to support the dice, a shaft supportin the disc, a ratchet wheel fixed on the sha t, an arm mounted in the casing, a pawl mounted on the arm to engage the wheel; the pawl and arm being disposed relative to the wheel so that when the arm is in its normal position the pawl will be clear of the wheel but when said arm is moved from such position the pawl will engage the ratchet wheel and will rotate said wheel when the arm is then retracted, a spring acting on the arm to thus retract the same and tending to maintain it in its normal position, a trigger member operable from outside the casing for moving the arm from its normal position against the resistance of the spring; said trigger bein disposed relative to the arm to engage and move the arm for a certain travel of the trigger and to then clear the arm with a further 0 travel to allow thespring to function.

In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.

WILLIAM D. WALKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8109832 *Mar 7, 2008Feb 7, 2012Tien-Shu HsuSic-bo automated dice-cage and method of implementing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/145.00E
International ClassificationA63F9/04
Cooperative ClassificationA63F9/0406
European ClassificationA63F9/04B