Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1702359 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1929
Filing dateMar 19, 1928
Priority dateMar 19, 1928
Publication numberUS 1702359 A, US 1702359A, US-A-1702359, US1702359 A, US1702359A
InventorsEinar Molmark
Original AssigneeEinar Molmark
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrode holder
US 1702359 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Febo 99 1929@ E. MOLMARK ELECTRODE HOLDER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 3.9I 1928 Feb. 19? 1929c E. MDLMARK ELECTRODE HOLDER Filed March 19J 1928 5 Sheets-Sheet Patented Feb. 19, 1929.

UNITED STATES EINAB IOLMRX, OF AMBRI'DGE, PENNSYLVANIA.

nnncrnonn Homann Application Med latch 19, 1928. Serial No. 282,941.

This invention relates to electrode holders, and more particularly to holders for large electrodes such as. used in electric metallurgical furnaces, retorts and the like, and has e for its object the provision of an electrode holder that will clamp or hold the electrode securely and will automatically compensate for the expansion caused by the heat.

Heretofore, electrode holders of the class to which this invention belongs have generally been ot a split formation and clamped around the electrode, and have been watercooled to prevent excessive expansion, which, would allow the electrode to drop.

The electrode holder of this invention eliminates the use of water cooling, the body portion is formed integral or continuous, and

y the electrode may be clamped or released by the operation of a single lever.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of an electrode holder constructed in accordance with my in vention. I

Figure 2 is a top plan thereof.

Figure 3 is a side elevation, partly in seetion, showing a slightly modified form of electrode holder.

' Figure 4is a top plan thereof.

Figure 5 is a side elevationpartly in section, showing a still further modified formv of electrode holder.

Figure 6 is a top plan thereof.

1 Referring more particularly to the drawings, the numeral 2 designates the continous ring-like body of the electrode holder as a whole, which has a projecting portion 3 on one side for connecting to the furnace and to the bus bar (not shown) and a second slotted projection 4 on the side op osite the projection 3 for a pur ose to be escribed.

The inside wa l of the body 2 is recessed at apoint opposite the projection 3 to receive a wedge-shaped clamping shoe 5. The rear face 6 of the recess is inclined so as to cooperate with the wedge-shaped shoe when said shoe is moved vertically to force said shoe inwardly.

The inner face of the shoe 5 is formed concave or curved to fit the curvature of the electrode. The upper endof the shoe 5 is pro vided with an upwardly extending lug 6 which is aperturedhorizontally to receive a pivot cpin 7. A toggle link 8 is pivotally conneete to the lugA 6 by the pin 7 and has its other end pivotally connected by a. pin 9 to the lower end of the short arm ofacranklever 10 which is ivotally mounted on a pivot pin 12 journaledJ in bearings 13 on the upper end of the projection 4. A counter-weight 14 is adjustably mounted on the long arm of the crank lever l and is adapted to apply a constant force to the lever 10 so as to extend the toggle composed of the short arm of they lever 10 and the link 8 soas to move the shoe 5 against the electrode.

A link 15 has one end pivotally secured to the long arm of the lever 10 intermediate its ends and has its other end pivotally connectved to one end of a. second link 16 which has its other end pivotally connected to the pair of ears 17 on the pro ection 4 by a pin 18.

The links 15 an 16 are releasing and supporting means for the shoe and its o rating mechanism. When it is desired to re ease the shoe 5, a lifting or upwardly directed force is applied to the links 15 and 16 at their oint of connection, which will cause said lin s to move upwardly into a line position and to force said counter-weighted lever upwardly, thereby releasing the shoe 5. The links and '16 will then preferably be forced slightly beyond their line or center position 'and will serve to hold said lever 10 in its raised position.

The'inner wall of the body 2 is provided with a slightly projected seat portion 20'at a point directly opposite from the clamping shoe 5. The seat 20 is formed concave or curved to fit the curvature of the electrode, and the electrode A, is adapted to be clamped between theseat 20 and shoe 5.

In Fi ures 3 and 4 I have shown a slightly modifie form of electrode holder composed of the continuous ring-like body 2, having the projection 3 on one side and having a slotted projection on the side of the body opposite the rojection 3.

T e inside wall of the body 2 is recessed at a vpoint opposite the rojection 3 to receive a clam ing shoe 31. face ormed,y concave or curved to it the curva ture of the electrode, and is provided with a stem 32 which extends outwardly through an opening in the body 2 and into the slot in the projection 30.

'A crank lever 33, having relatively long and short arms 34 and 35, is fulcrumed on a pivot pin 36 mounted in the slotted projection 30. The short arm of the lever 33 extends downwardly through the alot in the 110 e shoe 31 has its inner 100 projection 30 and is loosel mounted in a slot 37 in the stem 32, while ,t e lon arm 34 extends away from the body 2 an is provided with a counter-weight 38 which is adjustably locked in position on the arm by a set-screw :Ihe inner wall of the body 2 is provided with a slightly projected seat portion 40 at a point directly opposite from the clamping against the. electrode so as to compensate forl the expansion of the holder parts.

lVhen it is desired to adjust or remove the electrode, it is only necessary to raise the counter-weighted lever mechanism slightly so as to withdraw the shoe and release the electrode.

In VFigures5 and.6 I have shown a still further modified form of electrode holder composed of the continuous ring-like body 2, having the projection 3 on one side and having an opening 45 through the body approximately opposite the projection 3 in which a clamping s oe 46 is slidablymounted. A pair of s aced lugs or ears 47 extend upwardly from t e u per edge of the body 2 in line with the side aces of the opening 45, and a second pairv of spaced lugs or ears 48 extend outwardly from the side wall of the body in line with the side faces of the opening 45.

The shoe 46 vhas its inner or electrode en gaging face serrated so as to bite into and grip t e electrode and is adapted to be moved 1n and out toward and away from the electrode by a toggle link mechanism to be described.

The toggle is composed of a link 49 having one end pivotall mounted on a pin 50 adjustably mounts in slotted bearing openings 50'L in the ears48, and having its other end pivotallconnected by a pin 51 to one end of togg e links 'which have their other ends pivotally mounted on a pin 53, journaled in a bearing lug 54 on the shoe 46.

The pin 56 is adapted to be adjusted bacia and forth in the slotted bearing openings 5()a in the ears 48 so as to var f the throw oi the toggle links 49 and 52 an thereby vary the movement of the shoe 46 so as ,to permit the shoe to grip varices sizes of electrodes. Set screws are provided for locking the pin 50 in positions.

A. tie web 66 afetween the ears 48 and serves VAto limit the downward movement of the toggle links 49 and 52.

A counter-weight lever 55 is pivotally mounted at one end on a pin 56 journaled in bearing apertures in the ears or lugs 47, and

has a counter-weight 57 adjustably secured thereon. i

-A pair of toggle operating links 58 are pivotally connected at-one end to a pin 59 journaled in a bearing in the lcounter-weight. lever 55 and have their other ends pivotally connected to the pin 51 connecting the toggle members.

A counterweight operating and supporting toggle is composed of pairs of links 60 and 61. The links 60 have their upper ends pivotally mounted on a pin 62 journaled in an aperture in the counter-weight lever 55 and have their lower ends pivotally connected to the upper ends of the links 61 by a pin 63. The lower ends of the links 61 are pivotally 5mounted on the reduced ends of the pin 0.

In operatiomwhen it is desired to release the electrode, the toggle composed of links 60 'and 61 will be straightened 'by applying pressure at the point of connection of the links and, as the links 60 and 61 are straightened, the counter-weight lever 55 will be forced upwardly. IVhen the links 60 and 61 are moved into a straight line the will serve as a stii leg to support or hold t e counterweight lever in elevated or raised position. v As the counter-weight lever 55 is raised, it will create a pull on the links 58 so as to colla se the toggle members 49 and 52 and there y move or pull the shoe 46 away from the electrode.

When it is desired to lock or grip the elec trode A, the toggle links 60 and 61 will be collapsed, permitting the counter-weight lever 55 to move down by thel weight of the counter-weight 57, Which movement will be communicated through the links 58 to the toggle members 49 and 52, so as to extend said members and force the shoe 46 into enga ement with the electrode A.

ile I have shown and described certain specific embodiments of my invention it will be understood that I do not wish to he lim ited thereto since various modications may be made without departingfrcm the scope thereof, as defined in the appended claims.

I claim- 1. An electrode holder for electric furnaces comprising a ring-like continuous body in which the electrode is mounted, a clamping shoe reciprocably mounted in said holder and adapted te be moved toward and away from said electrode, and counter-weighted f seat portion formed on a. portion of the inner Wall of said body and contoured to snugly fit the electrode, a clamping shoe mounted in said holder opposite said seat portion, and means for normally forcing said clamping shoe against the electrode'.

3. An electrode holder for electric furnaces comprising a ring-like continuous body in which the electrode is mounted, a smooth seat portion formed on a portion of the inner Wall of said body and contoured to snugly fit the electrode, a recess in the inner Wall of said body op osite said seat, a' clamping shoe reciprocab f mounted in said recess, and a counter-Weighted lever-for normally forcing said clamping shoe against said electrode.

4. A n electrode holder for electric furnaces comprising a ring-like continuous body in which the electrode is mounted, a smooth seat portion formed on a portion of the inner Wall of said body and contoured tosnugly fit the electrode, a recess in the inner Wall of said body opposite said seat, a clamping shoe reciprocably mounted in said recess, a stem on said shoe, and a counter-weighted operated tog le mechanism adapted to normally force sai clamping shoe against said electrode.

5. An electrode holder for electric furnaces comprising a ring-like body in which the electrode is mounted, a seat formed on a portion of the inner Wall of said body and contoured to snugly fit the electrode, a clampin shoe mounted in said holder opposite sai seat portion, and a counter-Weighted lever mechanism for moving said shoe to clamp said electrode. y

6. An electrode holder for electric furnaces comprising a ring-like body in which the electrode is mounted, a seat formed on a portion of the inner wall of said body and contoured to snugly lit the electrode, a recess formed in the inner face of said holder opposite said seat portion, said recess having an inclined rear Wall, a Wedge-shaped clamping shoe mounted in said recess, and a counter- Weighted lever mechanism for moving said shoe vertically to clamp said electrode.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set In hand.

y EINAR MOLMAREo

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2700201 *Apr 3, 1950Jan 25, 1955United States Steel CorpOperating mechanism for rotary slips
US2884475 *Jul 12, 1957Apr 28, 1959Elektrokemisk AsClamp members for supporting electrodes
US2899477 *Oct 15, 1956Aug 11, 1959 Safety device for remotely controlled manipulators
US2906799 *May 15, 1958Sep 29, 1959Universal Cyclops Steel CorpElectrode-engaging apparatus
US2911455 *Apr 13, 1956Nov 3, 1959Sunrod Mfg CorpElectrode clamp
US3026444 *Sep 22, 1959Mar 20, 1962Aei Birlec LtdElectrode clamps
US3093220 *Feb 11, 1959Jun 11, 1963Modrey Henry JElastic fastener
US3177394 *Jul 14, 1960Apr 6, 1965W C Heraens G M B HSecuring device for furnace electrodes
US3390220 *Jul 10, 1967Jun 25, 1968Beteiligungs & Patentverw GmbhElectrode holder for arc furnaces
US3524227 *Aug 29, 1967Aug 18, 1970Kelly William FGripping and release assembly
US3671656 *May 17, 1971Jun 20, 1972Union Carbide CorpElectrode contact device
US4250734 *Mar 29, 1979Feb 17, 1981Bartin LimitedWire gripping devices
US5108066 *Apr 13, 1990Apr 28, 1992Lundstrom Donald AHand releasable locking collar
US5224681 *Apr 27, 1992Jul 6, 1993Lundstrom Donald AHand releasable locking collar
US20110274137 *Apr 20, 2010Nov 10, 2011Thomas PiccardiLateral hoist for electrode columns of electric arc melting furnaces
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/494, 24/524, 24/522, 373/100, 24/136.00R
International ClassificationH05B7/00, H05B7/103
Cooperative ClassificationH05B7/103
European ClassificationH05B7/103