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Publication numberUS1702612 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1929
Filing dateDec 20, 1926
Priority dateDec 20, 1926
Publication numberUS 1702612 A, US 1702612A, US-A-1702612, US1702612 A, US1702612A
InventorsCarl K Morse
Original AssigneeEleanor H Morse
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil-separating apparatus
US 1702612 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 19, 1929; 1,702,612

c. K. MORSE OIL SEPARATIiNG APPARATUS Filed Dec. 20. 1926 INVENTOR ATTOR Patented Feb. 19, 1929.

UNITED STATES earner QFFICE.

CARL K. MORSE, OF GB/EENWIOH, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO ELEANOR H. MORSE, OF GREENWIGH, CONNECTICUT.

OIL-SEPABATING- APPARATUS.

Application filed December 20, 1926.

lVIy invention relates to oil separating apparatus.

The object of my invention is to provide an apparatus to separate oil from water and refuse such as found in garages where automobiles are stored. cleaned and repaired, or wherever oil is mixed with other materials.

Referring to the drawings which form a part of this specification:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of an oil separating apparatus embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is a plan View thereof, the cover being partly removed for purposes of this description.

Referring now to the drawings, A indicates a tank of sheet metal, rectangular in form and having a length about twice that of its width. as constructed for general use in garages etc. The depth of the tank is about equal to that of its width. It is provided with a flange A which extends entirely around the upper edge of the tank and with a cover comprising two portions A and A respectively, bolted to said flange by bolts A The tank is equipped with two partitions B and C respectively, the partitions extending entirely across the tank. The partition B extends from the top downward nearly to the bottom thereof as illustrated and the partition C extends from the bottom upwardly about two thirds the height of the tank and spaced from the partition B to form a conduit E through which water and any entrained oil may flow from chamber D to chamber F. The top of the partition C is provided with an apron extension C to prevent surging of the fluid in the chamber.

The tank is provided with two outlets for oil indicated by G and located in longitudinal alignment with each other the lower edges of which are located a short distance above the top of partition C. An outlet for water is provided comprising a circular partition H which extends from a point above the outlets G downward to the bottom opening H providing an outlet conduit H and a piped outlet H the bottom of which is located in alignment with the bottom of outlet openings G.

The tank is further provided with doors I--I respectively for access in cleaning out the tank when sediment has been deposited Serial No. 155,894.

therein from time to time, the sediment being indicated by letter J. K indicates a gas release pipe which is connected to the tank on one side thereof and extends well above the top, and also serves to prevent water or oil from overflowing in event of excess flow to the chamber D from the source of supply. The partition B is cut away across the middle of its top and the lower end of a. triangular shaped table L rests on its top between the higher end walls at B The lower end of this table extends entirely across the tank and rests at or below the bottom line ofthe outlet pipe H This table is preferably made of galvanized iron, the corrugations M extending transversely and measuring about A of an inch from centre to centre of same, and the table is inclined about one inch per foot from the top end N to the bottom corrugation O, and is further provided with side walls or flanges Iv An inlet pipe P extends through the rear wall of the casing near its top, the lower portion resting in the upper end of the table M as illustrated. A sump Q, empties into the pipe P. A steam pipe R extends through the side walls of the tank and is arranged in return bend form and the table rests on the pipe and is heated by steam flowing in the direction indicated by the arrow in Figure 2, thus the water of condensation will readily flow to the outlet steam trap (not shown) located at the lower end of the pipe R.

By heating the mixture of oil, grease, dirt and water as it flows over the table, the oil and grease are rendered more fluid and separates from the dirt and water and float to the top of the same so that when the fluid flows from the spreading table into the tank, the oil and grease float at once to the oil outlet.

The operation is as follows:

Water. oil, dirt and grease are deposited in the sump Q, the water content carrying the oil, grease and dirt through pipe P to the table lsL where its flow in volume is checked by the corrugations, causing it to flow laterally in the same until it overflows to the next lower corrugation where it is spread over a greater area and the oil separates from the water as it surges and passes over the table and when it reaches the tank chamber I), the water fills the tank until it overflows through conduit E into chamtill her F and therefrom through conduit H and outlet H to a drain. The surge of the water entering chamber I) causes the water to rise to a slightly greater height in conduit E, helped also by the weigl'it of oil resting on the sin-face of the water in chamber D. The oil is carried away when it reaches the outlet G in either chamber, the oil reaching chamber i being that entrained with the flowing water and rising from the sedin'ient carried to the bottom of the chambers. Instead of using a corrugated table I may use any other form that will spread the water and agitate the refuse material while obstructing the rapid flow over its surface, such as raised or embossed ribs formed in the bottom of the table, but I prefer the corrugated form as it is easy to obtain and relatvely low in cost.

Where the oil is heavy and in cold weather, I prefer to use the steam while operating the device, as the oil separates faster and thus the device is more efficient. The apparatus is entirely automatic in action and has been found in actual practice to work successfully, practically all of the oil and grease being recovered trom the sludge.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new is:

1. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having a chamber provided with an outlet for oil, and an outlet for water located on a lower plane, an inlet conduit for water and a spreading table located in said tank with its lower end resting adjacent the oil level therein, and extending from said conduit to said tank for spreading the fluid as it flows to said chamber.

2. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having a chamber provided with an outlet for oil, and an outlet for water located on a lower plane, an inlet conduit for water and an inclined spreading table located in said tank with its lower end resting adjacent tie oil level therein, and GK- tending from said conduit to said tank for spreading the fluid as it flows to said chamher.

3. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having a chamber provided with an outlet for oil, and. an outlet for water located on a lower plane, an inlet conduit for water and an inclined spreading table located in said tank with its lower end resting adjacent the oil level therein, and having obstructing surfaces in its upper side, said. table extending from said conduit to said tank for spreading the fluid as it flows to said chamber.

4:. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having a chamber provided with an outlet for oil, and an outlet for water located on a lower plane, an inlet conduit for water and a triangular shaped table located in said tank with its lower end resting adjacent the oil level therein, and extending from said conduit to said tank for spreading the fluid as it flows to said chamber.

5. An oil separating apparatus con'iprising a tank having a chamber provided witl an cut-let for oil, and an outlet for water located on a lower plane, an inlet conduit for water and a triangular shaped table having transversely extending corrugations in its upper side located in t id tank wi its lower end adjacent the wal'c level therein, and extending from said conduit to said tank for spreading the fluid as it flows to said chamber.

6. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having a plurality of chambers formed therein, each of which is provided with an outlet for oil located on the same plane and one of which has an ou let for water located on a lower plane, an inlet cou duit for water, triangular shaped table extending from said inlet to one said chambers designated the primary chamber and located in said tank, a conduit leading from the lower side of the primary chamber to the adjacent chamber, and a conduit leading from the lower side of said adjacent chamber to said outlet.

7. An oil separating apparatus comprising a spreading table and tank having two chambers formed by a partition extending from near the top thereof to near the bottom thereof and a partition extending f om too bottom thereof tcwai l the top tl spaced from said first-named partition to provide a conduit or passage for fluid from the first or primary chamber to the s I chamber, each chamber having an outlet for oil located in the same plane, above the plane to which said last-named partition er;- tends, a conduit extending from near the bottom of the second chamber to an outlet for water located a short distance below the plane of the oil outlets, and a conduit for fluid lea-ding to said primary chamber, and means located directly under said table con nected with a source of heat supply, and adapted to heat the fluid flowing over the table.

8. An oil separating apparatus comprising tank having two chambers formed by a partition extending from near the top thereof to near the bottom thereof and partition extending from the bottom thereof toward the top thereof and spaced from said first-named partition to provide a conduit or passage for fluid from the first or primary chamber to the second chamber, each chamber having an outlet for oil located in the same plane, and above the plane to which said last-named partition eitends, a conduit extending from near the bottom of the second chamber to an oi let for wa located a short distance below the plane or the oil outlets, a table, and a conduit for Lil fluid leading from an inlet over said spreading table to said primary chamber, and means located directly under said table connected with a source of heat supply, and adapted to heat the fluid flowing over the table.

9. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having two chambers formed by a partition extending from near the top thereof to near the bottom thereof and a partition extending from the bottom thereof toward the top thereof and spaced from said first-named partition to provide a conduit or passage for fluid from the first or primary chamber to the second chamber, each. chamber having an outlet for oil located in the same plane, and above the plane to which said last-named partition extends, a conduit extending from near the bottom of the second chamber to an outlet for water located a short distance below the plane of the oil outlets, a spreading table having obstructing elements over which fluid must flow and a conduit for fluid leading to said table and to said primary reservoir, and means located directly under said table connected with a source of heat supply, and adapted to heat the fluid flowing over the table.

10. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having two chambers formed by a partition extending from near the top thereof to near the bottom thereof and a partition extending from the bottom thereof toward the top thereof and spaced from said first-named partition to provide a con duit or passage for fluid from the first or primary chamber to the second chamber, each chamber having an outletfor oil located in the same plane, and above the plane to which said last-named partition extends, a conduit extending from near the bottom of the second chamber to an outlet for water located a short distance below the plane of the oil outlets, an inclined spreading table located in said tank and having obstructing elements over which fluid must flow and a conduit for fluid leading to said table and to said primary reservoir, and means located directly under said table connected with a source of eat supply, and adapted to heat the fluid flowing over the table.

11. an oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having two chambers formed by a partition extending from near the top thercof to near the bottom thereof and a partition extending from the bottom thereof toward. the top thereof and spaced from said firstnamed partition to provide a conduit or pa, sage for fluid from the first or primary chamber to the second chamber, each chamber having an outlet for oil located in the same plane, and aboye the plane to which said lastnarned partition extends, a conduit extending from near the bottom of the sec ond chamber to an outlet or water located a short distance below the plane of the oil outlets, a spreading table comprising a steam coil located thereunder in contact therewith, means for heating said table, and a conduit for fluid leading from an inlet over said table to said primary chamber.

12. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having two chambers formed bv a partition extending from near the top thereof to near the bottom thereof and a partition extending from the bottom thereof toward the top thereof and spaced from said firstnamed partition to provide a conduit or passage for fluid from the first or primary chamber to the second chamber, each chamber having an outlet for oil located in the same place, and above the plane to which said last-named partition extends, a conduit extending from near the bottom of the second chamber to an outletfor water located a short distance below the plane of the oil outlets, a triangular shaped spreading table having obstructing elements over which fluid must flow and a conduit for fluid leading to said table and to said primary reservoir.

13. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having two chambers formed by apartition extending from near the top thereof to near the bottom thereof and a partition extending from the bottom thereof toward the top thereof and spaced from said first-named partition to provide a conduit or passage for fluid from the first or primary chamber to the second chamber, each chamber having an outlet for oil located in the same place, and above the plane to which said last-named partition extends, a conduit extending from near the bottom of the second chamber to an outlet for water located a short distance below the plane of the oil outlets, the top of said partition having a downwardly inclined off-set portion on the water outlet side to prevent surging action, and a conduit for fluid leading to said primary chamber.

ll. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having two chambers formed by a partition extending from near the top thereof to near the bottom thereof and a partition extending from the bottom thereof toward the top thereof and spaced from said first-named partition to provide a conduit or passage for fluid from the first or primary chamber to the second chamber, each chamber having an outlet for oil located in the same plane, and above the plane to which said last-nained partition extends, a conduit extending from near the bottom of the second chamber to an outlet for water located a short distance below the plane of the oil outlets, a spreading table located in said tank the lower end of which is adjacent the water level therein, and having 0b- StIL'lCt-ll'lg elements comprising transverselyextending corrugations over which fluid must flow and a conduit for fluid leading to said table and to said primary reservoir.

15. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having a chamber with an outlet for oil. and an outlet for Water located on a lower plane, an inlet conduit for Water, a table extending from said conduit to said tank for spreading and retarding the flow of the fluid as it flows to the tank, and means for heating said table located thereunder adjacent thereto connected with a source of heat supply.

16. An oil separating apparatus comprising a tank having a chamber With an outlet for oil, and an outlet for Water located on a lower plane, an inlet conduit for Water, a table having obstructing surfaces in its upper side for retarding and spreading the fluid as it flows to said tanln and means for heating said table in direct contact therewith and with a heating source, substantially set forth.

In testimony whereof I have affixed my signature.

CARL K. MORSE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2478934 *Mar 13, 1942Aug 16, 1949Eleanor H MorseElectric apparatus for separating oils from mixtures
US2517117 *Sep 17, 1946Aug 1, 1950Komline Sanderson Eng CorpClarifier
US2520304 *Mar 4, 1947Aug 29, 1950Brand William THoney capping melter
US2586221 *Jan 12, 1950Feb 19, 1952Nat Tank CoHorizontal separator
US2711826 *Aug 30, 1951Jun 28, 1955Nat Tank CoLow temperature separating units
US2745551 *Mar 12, 1951May 15, 1956J A Zurn Mfg CoSeparator
US2908393 *Aug 20, 1954Oct 13, 1959Alfred Y LanphierOil separator raft
US2942733 *Jan 18, 1956Jun 28, 1960Coastguard Separators LtdSeparators for liquids having different specific gravities
US3146458 *Nov 18, 1960Aug 25, 1964Bethlehem Steel CorpUnderwater storage unit
US3331510 *Sep 8, 1964Jul 18, 1967Arnold James WEmergency water reservoir
US3485367 *Feb 8, 1967Dec 23, 1969Shell Oil CoProcess and apparatus for separating a mixture consisting of a viscous liquid being immiscible with water as one component and water as the other component
US4042512 *Oct 27, 1976Aug 16, 1977Mccarthy Patrick MOil water separator
US4137173 *Dec 1, 1976Jan 30, 1979Jarvis Cyril LTrap for grease or other foreign matter dissolved or entrained in a liquid
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US6537458 *Mar 3, 2000Mar 25, 2003Shell Oil CompanyThree-phase separator
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Classifications
U.S. Classification210/187, 209/207, 210/519, 210/532.1
International ClassificationB01D21/00, B01D17/02
Cooperative ClassificationB01D21/0027, B01D21/003, B01D21/009, B01D21/0042, B01D21/10, B01D17/0208, B01D21/2405
European ClassificationB01D21/00T, B01D21/00L, B01D21/00N2, B01D21/00M, B01D21/24A, B01D21/10, B01D17/02F