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Publication numberUS1702619 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 19, 1929
Filing dateJun 27, 1927
Priority dateJun 27, 1927
Publication numberUS 1702619 A, US 1702619A, US-A-1702619, US1702619 A, US1702619A
InventorsJr Sumner B Sargent
Original AssigneeJr Sumner B Sargent
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liner pump
US 1702619 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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Feb. 19, 1929.

'Patented Feb. 19, 1929.

UMTED STATES SUMNER B. SABGENVT, JB., OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

LINER PUMP.

Application filed June 27, 1927. Serial No. 201,801.

My invention relates to the art of pumping oil wells, being more particularly a pump barrel construction. The common form of pump barrels now in use usually consist of a section of the tubing in which is arranged a series of liners formed of cylindrical cast sections, arranged end to end and forming a liner for the barrel in which `the plunger reciprocates. Such liners are set up by placing the same endto-end between two collars, one at each end, upon a mandrel, the collars being tightened in the barrel and the mandrel removed after which the liners depend for alignment solely on the end thrust established between the collars.

These liners are ordinarily made of cast iron and the barrel of steel, it being extremely esssential that the joints between the sections be smooth at all times and that such sections do not get out. of alignment. However, with such common forms of construction, on the downstroke ot the pump plunger, the pump barrel stretches due to the fact that the standing valve takes thel entire load of the weight of oil, above the standing valve. This stretching amounts to approximately .009 inches on a 7 toot barrel, resultinlg in the allowance of the pump liners to loosen' and become out of alignment. When this occurs, it frequently causes the plunger to vstick and become inoperative, generally, it results inexcessive Wear on the plunger and cups thereon.

In my invention, I primarily desire to relieve the pump barrel of taking the load of the body oi oil on the down stroke of the pump and, in so relieving such barrel of the load, l relieve such barrel of any stretchin r. alignment and the objectionable features above noted are overcome.

To attain this object, I provide a pump barrel which is attached to the tubing at its lower end, the pump barrel extending upwardly into the tubing and being unconneoted at its upper end sothat no stretching of the pump barrel or movement of the.

liners therein takes place.

l have also discovered that in view of the fact that the liners are ordinarily made of cast iron and the pump barrel of steel, the steel having a greater coefficient of expansion, some diierence in the expansion between lthe barrel and the liners may take place, due to the heat of the oil during Consequently4 the liners remain 1n pumping, and it is one of the objects of my invention to provide also a. pum barrel s'o constructed that vthe barrel ,an liners remain -in substantially the same relation, regardless of different temperatures which may ei'ect the same due to the heating of the oil during the pumping operation.

Referring to the drawings which are for illustrative purposes only-I i .F1g. 1 is a'vertical view, partly in section of a string of tubing having attached thereto and combined therein a pump barrel construction embodying a form of my invention.

Fig 2 is an enlarged vertical sectional ylew of the upper end of the device shown 1n Fig. 1, and

Fig 3 is anV enlarged vertical sectional view of they lower end of the device shown in FiO'. 1.

11 designates the lower end of a string of tubing into which is threaded ay coupling member 12, to which is threaded the upper reduced end 13 of a section of tubing 14, the lower end of such section of tubing 14 being threaded onto a lower fitting or coupling member 15. The lower end of the fit-y ting 15 receives the upper end of tubing 16. v The coupling 15 is provided with a reduced up er end 17 threaded to receive the lower en of a pump barrel 18, the upper end of the pump barrel receiving the threaded lower end of a collar or cylindrical head 19.

Seated on the upper end of the coupling 15 is a ring or hollow block 20, preferably made of an alloy metal more fully hereinafter described. This ring 20 however forms a seat for the lower of a series of tubular sections 21 called liners, which form a lining for the pump barrel 18, the' uppermost liner being seated under the lower end of the collar or head 19, and when such liners 4have ,been properl aligned in' the barrel, the tlghtening of t e,head 19, exerting pressure through the liners against the rilng 20 is designed to hold the liners in ace. p 25 designates a plunger containing the Ordinar valve 26, a standing valve 27 being diagrammatically indicated at the lower end of the tubing and it being further understood that the plunger 25 is operated through a string of rods 28 from the up er end of the well. It is further to be un erstood that the pumping operation is the same as ordinarily carried on but particular stress is laid on the fact that the pump the tubing at its lower end through the medium of the couplin l5, the upper end of the pump barrel being entirely free of any connection with the tubing, and the barrel being of smaller diameter than the inside of the tubing, any expansion or contracting of the tubing is not imparted to the barrel. Further', by this arrangement, the pump barrel does not take the weight of the oil during the pumping operation, consequentl the liners do not get out of alignment but form 'anunbroken surface for the action of the plunger.

For the purpose of -overcoming an unu equal. expansion of the liners and pump barrel, due to the di'erent kinds of metal employed in their construction, I provide the ring 20 and malte the same of a metal which ,has a greater coetlicient of expansion than either the cast iron of the liners or the steel of the barrel, the thickness of the ring `being designed to accommodate the differto said coupling member, said pump barrel being free throughout its length of said tubing, and a series of liner sections in said pump barrel,l

2:11a combination with a string of tubing, a coupling member in said tubing string, a pump barrel in said tubing solely supported therein by connection at one end to sald coupling member, said pump barrel being free throughout its lengt ot said tubing,

mcaeie and a series of liner sections in said pump d tubing, and a series of liner sections in said pump barrel seated on said coupling member, and a collar on the upper end of of said barrel engaging the upper of said liner sections..

4. In combination with a string of tubing, a coupling member in ysaid tubing string, a pump barrel in said tubing solely supported therein by connection at one end to said coupling member, said pump barrel being free throughout its length of said tubing, a hollow block seated on said coup ling member, a series oita liner sections in said pump barrel, the vlowermost of said sections being seated on said hollow block and a collar on the upper end of said pump barrel engaging the uppermost liner section.

5. In combination with a string of tubing, a coupling member in said tubing string, a pump barrel in said tubing solely supported therein byconnection at one end to said coupling member, a hollow block seated on said coupling member, a series of liner sections in said pump barrel, the lowermost ot said sections being seated on said hollow block and a collar on the upper end of said pump barrel engaging the uppermost liner section, said hollow block being formed of a material having a greater coeliicient of expansion than the metal of said liners and pump barrel.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand at Los Angeles, California, this 18th day of June, 1927.

SUMNER e. sARenNr, JR.'

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2787964 *Oct 8, 1952Apr 9, 1957United States Steel CorpSectional liner pump
US3059819 *Jan 8, 1959Oct 23, 1962Sundhohn Edwin POptional loading grease gun
US4251202 *Sep 27, 1978Feb 17, 1981Kobe Steel, LimitedMolding die stem with sleeve
US4691740 *Jun 21, 1985Sep 8, 1987Phillips Petroleum CompanyPipeline lining
US4759407 *Jun 24, 1987Jul 26, 1988Mitchell Supply, Inc.Inverted working barrel and seat and method of manufacturing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/554, 285/55, 285/390
International ClassificationF04B53/16
Cooperative ClassificationF04B53/16
European ClassificationF04B53/16