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Publication numberUS1703761 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 26, 1929
Filing dateNov 29, 1926
Priority dateJan 22, 1926
Publication numberUS 1703761 A, US 1703761A, US-A-1703761, US1703761 A, US1703761A
InventorsHenry Berry Herbert
Original AssigneeHenry Berry Herbert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric fire and radiator
US 1703761 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 26, 1929. 1,703,761

H. H. BERRY ELECTRIC 'FIRE AND RADIATOR Patented Feb. 26, 19729.

UNITED STATES P.lTlzNTy OFFICE.

HERBERT vHENRY BERRY, oF LoNDoN, ENGLAND.

ELEC'IRICV FIRE Application mea November 29, 192s, serial No.

.glass or equivalent `material particularly if the said metal has bright reflecting surfaces because it then produces what appears to be lumps of black coal or other real fuel and bright burning parts thereon.

@ther devices to further simulate burning may be employed, such as that which I will call a rising sparkdevice and which is later described. My'invention may be described as consisting inusing this irregularly perforated sheet.l metal (in conjunction with a screen of coloured translucent material in an electric fire having in it one or more electric lights with or without flicker producingv devices and with or without heating elements. I will describe my invention with reference to the accompanying drawings, in Which:

Fig. 1 shows a sheet of glass or other translucent material say coloured muranese glass suitable for use in front of an electric fire.

Fig. 2 shows an irregularly perforated metal sheet for use behind the glass panel.

Fig. 3 shows another metal sheet for the rising spark effect above referred to.

Fig. 4L is a section, on larger scale, of a sheet of perforated metal such as is seen in Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 shows in outline, artly broken away, an electric fire fitted with panels like those seen in Figs. 1 and 2.

Fig. G shows part of an electric fire having sheets as 1, 2 and 7 in itand fitted with a rising spark device.

The sheet of glass 1 is shown fitted into the fire in Fig. 5 and has behind it the perforated sheet of metal 2 in which the perforations or openings 3 are of irregular shapes and have side surfaces 4 at various angles and adapted to reflect light from the lamp 5 which is fitted into a flicker device 6 constructed as a fan which may have bright blades to enhance the flicker effect. The front of t-he fire has a vertical groove at each side to receive the glass 1 and the sheet 2 which may be simply dropped into position.

In Fig. 6 the glass panel 1 has a sheet, such AND RADIATOR.

151,545, and in Great Britain January 22, 1986. i

as 2, behind it and behind that is a slotted screen 7 such as seen in Fi 3, and inside the fire I arrange a lantern 8 pivoted over an electric lamp and adapted to be rotated by heat therefrom." This lantern has irregular slots 9 set in opposite relation to those inthe screen 7 and so that as the lantern rotates the light seen from the front of the screen rappears to move upwardly and as the slots are narrow the result is the rising spark effect above mentioned.

say polished aluminium so that the reflecting edges, as 4, are easily produced. The unshaded part of the metal will produce the The sheet of metal 2vis preferably bright unburnt or black coal, etc. effect whilstthev openings 3 with reflecting edges 4 will produce the burning appearance.

The drawings show the invention applied to the front of an electric fire or radiator but it can be applied over the top also and be fitted with any suitable fire place, such as a basket fire or a fire on the top of which imitation wood logs are used such being well known in various forms in connection with electric radiators. If desired other o aque material may be used instead of meta and the reflecting surfaces at the openings therein need not e provided.

The drawings do not show a metal or other equivalent frame in front of the coloured screen, but if such is used it may be of any convenient form with irregular openings and which will produce an effect resembling coal or other real fuel.

What I claim is f 1. An electric radiator comprisin a frame work constituting the body of the ra iator, an electric lamp mounted in the lower part of the frame work, a flicker-producing device positioned above the lamp and actuated by heat therefrom, a coloured translucent screen in front of the lamp and an opaque screen between the coloured screen and the lamp, said opaque screen having in it a, number of irregular openings the edges of which are bright and are adapted to reflect light from the lamp.

2. An electric radiator comprising a frame work constituting the body of the radiator, an electric lamp mounted in the lower part of the frame work, a flicker-producing device positioned above the lamp and actuated by heat therefrom, a coloured translucent screen in front of the lamp and an opaque screen between the coloured screen andthe lamp,

said opaque'screen having in it a number of irregular openings and another screen between the opaque screen andthe lamp, the last mentioned screen having in it slot-like openings set at an angle to the vertical, and a lantern device around the lamp and adapted to rotate with the ,ilickerproducing device, said lantern having in it slot-like openings set at inclinations tothe vertical and in opposite relation to the' slots in the said screen.

' 3. A radiator arranged to simulate burning fuel and sparks rising therefrom, including an upright frame, an electric lamp mounted in rear of theV frame, anl opaque screen mounted in the frame in front ot the lamp, said opaque screen being formed with openings to permit the passage of lightfrom the lamp therethrough, the edges of the openings being brightened in part to provide refleeting surfaces, a seco-nd screen arranged 'in rea-r of thev opaque screen and in substantial contact therewith, said second screen being formed ,with a vseries of substantially uniform slot-like openings to cause the light rays to be controlled by said openings prior to the passage of such rays through Ythe opaque screen, and means whereby the light rays may be controlled in their passage `longitaidinally of said slot-like openings.

4. A radiator arranged to simulate burning fuel and sparks rising therefrom, including an upright frame, Van electric lamp mounted in rear of the frame, an opaque screen mounted in the frame in front ofthe lamp, said vopaque screen being formed with openings to permit the passage of light from the lamp therethrough, the edges of the openings being brightened in part to provide reflecting surfaces, a second screen arranged in rear of the opaque screen and in substantial contact therewith, said second screenV being formed with a series of substantially` uniform slot-like openings to cause the light rays to be controlled by said openings prior to the passage of such rays through the opaque screen, means whereby the light rays may be controlled in their passage through the slots of the second screen to cause said light rays to appear to be movinglongitudinally I" said slot-like openings, and a colored translucent screen arranged beyond the opaque screen relative to the lampf In testimony whereof I aiiix my signature.

HERBERT HENRY BERRY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2795068 *Apr 20, 1953Jun 11, 1957Standard Louis GSigns
US6393207Jan 11, 2000May 21, 2002Cfm Majestic Inc.Electric fireplace with light randomizer, filter and diffuser screen
US6615519Apr 19, 2001Sep 9, 2003Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US6757487May 8, 2002Jun 29, 2004Cfm CorporationElectric fireplace with light randomizer, filter and diffuser screen
US6968123Oct 4, 2002Nov 22, 2005Cfm CorporationElectric fire assembly
US7194830Dec 17, 2004Mar 27, 2007Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US7373743Mar 14, 2007May 20, 2008Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US8361367Nov 29, 2011Jan 29, 2013Dimplex North America LimitedFlame simulating assembly
US8480937Jan 2, 2013Jul 9, 2013Dimplex North America LimitedMethod of forming a simulated combustible fuel element
US8661721Aug 8, 2005Mar 4, 2014Kristoffer HessFlame simulating assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/428
International ClassificationF24C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24C7/004
European ClassificationF24C7/00A2